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OT Fire on the USS bonhomme Richard

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  • OT Fire on the USS bonhomme Richard

    What a dreadful thing to happen to a beautiful ship. I hope they get the fire put out before there is a major oil spill.

  • #2
    Recent update from Navy Times:

    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...homme-richard/

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    • #3
      What concerns me is this is a combat vessel. If the fire suppression systems can't handle a fire in port, what will happen during combat? When enemy fire is com in hot and heavy!

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      • #4
        The fire suppression systems were turned off for repair according to the news article that I read.

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        • #5
          Something doesn't seem like it jives.
          If the fire supression system was down, then where did that much flammable 'stuff' come from?
          When you are working around the Navy, they tell you that they are the single most safety conscious organization to ever exist on this earth.
          If supression system was down, then the ship must be totally empty and vacant to be fire code compliant..........and de-fueled.......and power turned off......and the one and only thing allowed to be worked on is the supression system itself.....
          So, there is gonna be a investigation (and subsequent cover-up) and a report on this.
          The navee safety stories I could tell you............

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
            Something doesn't seem like it jives.
            If the fire supression system was down, then where did that much flammable 'stuff' come from?
            When you are working around the Navy, they tell you that they are the single most safety conscious organization to ever exist on this earth.
            If supression system was down, then the ship must be totally empty and vacant to be fire code compliant..........and de-fueled.......and power turned off......and the one and only thing allowed to be worked on is the supression system itself.....
            So, there is gonna be a investigation (and subsequent cover-up) and a report on this.
            The navee safety stories I could tell you............
            From the San Diego Times today. Quite the SNAFU if true. Heads gonna roll I suspect.

            Sobeck said on Monday that a shipboard firefighting system that uses Halon gas to suffocate fires was inoperable due to the maintenance.

            Another system that uses aqueous film-forming foam to fight fires was operational Sunday when the fire broke out, but before sailors could activate it, there was an explosion and they had to abandon the effort, Sobeck said.

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            • #7
              that still dont make sense, it not gonna be fire code compliant
              fire extinguishers are to be placed in the most vulerable spaces as well as adjacent spaces.
              That is because if a vulnerable item catches fire and the extinguisher is right there-you can't get to it, therefore the extinguisher is away from but still nearby that item.
              Same with fire alarm activation, it is to be nearby and accessible.
              And of all spaces that are protected, cargo is at the top of the list
              What you are describing is the TWO extinguishing systems were BOTH down at the same time.
              The primary halon was down, and the backup foam was down.
              Somebody pencil-whipped some inspection sign-offs

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              • #8
                Totally different scenario when you have explosions.
                Onboard systems can be OOC with damage.
                Len

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                • #9
                  Fire suppression systems can't cover every compartment on a ship so it matters where the fire started. It could have been in an advanced state before anyone tried to put it out. Ships crews are highly trained in damage control/fire fighting and if there had been a full crew on board then they probably would have had the fire under control right away and it wouldn't have gotten like it is.
                  The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                  Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                  Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                  • #10
                    You have to wonder..... How could a fire get so far out of control ? The ship is all steel, for the most part aside from some interior walls and rooms and maybe doors. But then there's miles and miles of jacketed wiring, and all the painted surfaces. if the fire hit fuel tanks or oil tanks I can see it getting out of control like that.

                    JL.....

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                    • #11
                      Bootcamp, Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Too long ago, but does anyone around here remember what a 'handy billy' was used for?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                        Fire suppression systems can't cover every compartment on a ship so it matters where the fire started. It could have been in an advanced state before anyone tried to put it out. Ships crews are highly trained in damage control/fire fighting and if there had been a full crew on board then they probably would have had the fire under control right away and it wouldn't have gotten like it is.
                        true the suppress system cannot cover every single compartment, but, whatever compartment has THAT MUCH flammable stuff in it certainly would have a suppress system

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post

                          true the suppress system cannot cover every single compartment, but, whatever compartment has THAT MUCH flammable stuff in it certainly would have a suppress system
                          You mentioned code compliant and inspections... I would think that only military code applies. Does it need to comply with local codes too?

                          Dan
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Guido View Post
                            Bootcamp, Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Too long ago, but does anyone around here remember what a 'handy billy' was used for?
                            A handy billy is a ready-to-use block-and-tackle, rove with one double and one single block (pulley). It is kept ready for use for any odd purpose wherever it might be needed on a ship, particularly in handling cargo.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by danlb View Post

                              You mentioned code compliant and inspections... I would think that only military code applies. Does it need to comply with local codes too?

                              Dan
                              I dont know all the codes, but I was a contractor on military bases for over 20 years, I found the military codes apply to military, but, the civil and military codes overlap so much that compliance with one amounts to compliance with the other, mostly. A great many civil codes are exerpt from military standards. Most of the time compliance with military codes inferrs compliance with civil.
                              An example would be US Coast Guard compliance on boats/ships. The USCG is considered a military branch and the navy ships would be USCG compliant. The USCG is the branch that all US flagged boats must comply with, cruise ships, civil cargo, charter boats, sightseeing boats, all have to be USCG compliant. I am licensed charter boat captain, but my testing and license came from the USCG.

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