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OT Fire on the USS bonhomme Richard

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  • tlfamm
    replied
    The Daily Mail has info about the suspect:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...nt-states.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    From: https://www.businessinsider.com/poss...fidavit-2021-8

    In the aftermath of the devastating fire, which is believed to have started in the lower vehicle storage area, investigators found evidence of arson, as well as possible indications that someone may have "purposely tampered with" the ship's firefighting equipment, according to an affidavit in support of a search warrant filed in September but unsealed Tuesday.
    Last edited by Arcane; 08-04-2021, 03:52 PM.

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  • Erich
    replied
    Hey JR. Focus on the headline and see if there is anything there that might be new...........................

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Why? I went to the link ( crappy links). Is it not the same stuff we know?

    I didnt see anything new about that case. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Arcane View Post
    Why? I went to the link ( crappy links). Is it not the same stuff we know?

    I didnt see anything new about that case. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    Reviving an old thread.

    https://thehill.com/policy/defense/n...-destroyed-uss

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    Not quite so...

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) or sulphur hexafluoride (British spelling), is an extremely potent and persistent man-made greenhouse gas that is primarily utilized as an electrical insulator and arc suppressant.[7] It is inorganic, colorless, odorless, non-flammable, and non-toxic. SF6 has an octahedral geometry, consisting of six fluorine atoms attached to a central sulfur atom. It is a hypervalent molecule.

    An excerpt from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_hexafluoride
    SF6 is used in line interrupters of power grid switches.
    I used to work designing them.
    Vacuum bottle interrupters have become more popular
    for smaller Kv applications.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    We used sulfur hexafluoride. Fine stuff unless you accidentally get some arcing and sparking. JR
    Not quite so...

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) or sulphur hexafluoride (British spelling), is an extremely potent and persistent man-made greenhouse gas that is primarily utilized as an electrical insulator and arc suppressant.[7] It is inorganic, colorless, odorless, non-flammable, and non-toxic. SF6 has an octahedral geometry, consisting of six fluorine atoms attached to a central sulfur atom. It is a hypervalent molecule.

    An excerpt from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_hexafluoride

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    I have worked with a heck of a lot of wave guide but never even heard of filling it with any kind of alcohol. Dry air and nitrogen were frequently used, but never any liquids of any kind.
    We used sulfur hexafluoride. Fine stuff unless you accidentally get some arcing and sparking. JR

    The system we used it with was about 1.5Mw @10.---Ghz. Very small waveguide at high power.

    The gas was used for cooling and spark prevention. I think it was the instructors scare tactic to get us to reassemble the WG correctly and carefully as to not create a potential arc point and possible hurt the klystron in the process (yes, there were other protections in place for large standing wave. I for get what they are call but a type of metallic window that would blow out.

    If there were arcing and sparking the decomp of the hex gas would create other gases. Florine was one.

    So yeah, it worked, never had any issues LOL.. JR

    https://www.epa.gov/sites/production...byproducts.pdf

    Good article
    https://srmsc.org/msr5220.html
    Last edited by JRouche; 12-02-2020, 08:46 PM.

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  • old mart
    replied
    Paul, now you know where the US Navy which is supposed to be dry were keeping their illicit hooch.

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  • tlfamm
    replied
    {Reactivating old thread}

    The Bonhomme Richard will be scrapped:

    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...homme-richard/

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I have worked with a heck of a lot of wave guide but never even heard of filling it with any kind of alcohol. Dry air and nitrogen were frequently used, but never any liquids of any kind.

    Leave a comment:


  • tlfamm
    replied
    As for whether or not the Bonhomme Richard is worth repairing (economically), recall the nuclear submarine USS Miami which was heavily damaged by fire (deliberately set) in 2012, and ultimately scrapped in lieu of a $700 million repair bill:

    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...o-be-scrapped/


    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
    ...and do all that while underway in a bad sea tossing you around......no thanks !
    It's the tossing around that makes it fun.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Ethyl alcohol is somewhat polar (so it dissolves well in water), and would be a horrible lossy dielectric material I'd think. Sounds like a scam, liquor is not generally allowed.

    Leave a comment:

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