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  • Lubricating cable

    I'm looking at my gluing press now that I've got it home. It has a cable system to bring the press bar down to the platen, and I'm going to lube that all up before I do anything with it. I'm thinking either wipe the whole length down with Triflow, or perhaps use a high quality chain lube. The cable stands to become contaminated with resin, so really it needs to be able to shed that easily enough. I can shield it, but really what I want to do is impregnate the cable with something that will stay there. Racing chain lube is my choice- unless there's a better way. What works for you?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Dunno if it would work for you, but an old trick from my competitive cycling days -- take the chain and cables and put them in a pot of boiling wax for a while. Then take them out and hang up to drip out the excess. Works great, nothing sticks to the wax, and it penetrates into everything when its hot. As it hardens up and cools off, it stays put.

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    • #3
      Yeah, I did that too.

      Not boiling wax, though, I used a double boiler, with water around the wax container. Worked just as well

      IIRC, some folks mixed waxes to get a slightly lower melting wax that was a bit softer, and as alleged to be better (I used regular paraffin wax, which is fairly hard and higher melting). I don't know if that was any better, but it seems as if it might be a tad better at lubrication. Not sure what they used, but I suspect it was beeswax.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Yup Beeswax and paraffin wax mixed about 50:50. The more paraffin wax the harder the final product. You can also modify final hardness using real turpentine. In fact if you have plenty of turpentine you don't even have to melt the wax, just use it as a solvent, apply and let the turpentine evaporate and leave the combined waxes in situ.
        West Sussex UK

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        • #5
          I remember hearing about the beeswax mixtures but I never tried it. Had a riding partner that used to swear by it. After college he went on to race semi-professionally for Honda (street bikes, 750cc) and I moved across the country and started work.

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          • #6
            so you want to seal the cable? try "hard oil", you know, the kind used to impregnate wood.

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            • #7
              Back in the day when motorbikes didn't have O ring chains, we used to boil the chains in Linklyfe - a black graphite waxy grease. The stuff would melt, the chain would sink into teh hot black goop and then you'd wish you'd fixed a bit of wire to the end of the chain.

              It was off the market for ages, but seems to be back now: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PUTOLINE-...-/361926663197

              Ian
              All of the gear, no idea...

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              • #8
                Chain spray. Fast easy cheap. Done

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                • #9
                  Easier to heat petroleum jelly, Vasoline, to impregnate control cables.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    The control cables on my BMW motorcycles are plastic (nylon?) lined and work for many thousands of miles without added lubrication. The bottom end of the clutch cable has a bellows to keep stuff from gaining entry to the cable. Can you adapt something like that to work?

                    Mike

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                    • #11
                      Use a wax toilet seal. I've done it many times works great.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                        Easier to heat petroleum jelly, Vasoline, to impregnate control cables.

                        -Doozer
                        Yeah but I get distracted....

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                        • #13
                          All of the above will do the job. Mostly I think I'd want to pick the one which is easiest to maintain and won't cause a mess by either rubbing off on me if I can't avoid touching them or which will cause a lot of airborne dust to stick to it.

                          For me anything I'd be using in a wood working shop suggests that I'd want a dry film lube. The dry part so airborne wood dust does not stick to it. And dry film so it does not risk transferring to the wood project and cause marking or finishing issues later on. And I'd want something in a easy application bottle or spray can so I can reapply as it wears away so you can maintain it without needing to take the rig apart like you'd need with dipping into melted wax.

                          Happily for wood shops there's a few easy to use products out there which are commonly used for slicking up machines so the wood glides easily over them. My primary choice for this is good old Johnson's paste wax out of a tin. Rub a little on the cables and other parts which might see drops of glue and they'll flick off easily. There's a little softening solvent in the paste formula which dries away. Smells a touch like Naphtha. But it aids with carrying the wax into the surface. And it's super easy to use and cheap to buy.

                          Another I tried recently is Bostik GlideCote. Some woodworkers were raving about this aerosol product. For me it seems to be a slightly more durable form of wax in a different solvent. It's better than the paste wax but at the cost of it not better enough. I'll use it until it's gone and go back to the far cheaper, less smelly (less solvent), tidier and easily used paste wax.

                          Another idea which I've yet to try is to simply use any good automotive wax. The primary point in this case isn't so much to lubricate the strands as it is to stop glue from sticking and to do so in a way that isn't messy in the wood area. And sticking with the idea that this will be a dry film style solution automotive waxing products are viable options. I know that some of the newer no haze style products that I prefer sure do make it easy to clean away bird droppings. And it sheds water strongly for a lot longer than most classic carnuba based waxes from what I see. And they go on and polish up super easily.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Those automotive products tend to have silicone in them , especially if they "work better"..... As you know, silicone is death to wood finishing, and there is about no way to get it off unless you cut away the wood it is in.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              Good call on the silicone issue. I'll check the labels to see if it says there's any in it. I may even try a test or two and see if there's a good reason for using one or the other and if it bothers the finishes I use.

                              In the meantime I'll stick with whichever is handy for myself then, GlideCote or paste wax. At least until the GlideCote is all gone.

                              Darryl, depending on what you're clamping in this press and possible finish issues likely you should take this into account too.
                              Last edited by BCRider; 07-16-2020, 02:25 PM.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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