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  • #31
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Yeah if it was big enough. But its ceramic micro spheres bedded in an aluminum sponge.

    My bet is on the electricians conduit saw at work. Turns out he has a special circular saw blade, with carbide tips that is made just for cutting conduit. Bet that would cut it.
    13mm is hardly a micro sphere 😀

    my first approach for cutting would be diablo diamond disk and some cutting fluid to help with the clogging..
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #32
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

      13mm is hardly a micro sphere 😀

      my first approach for cutting would be diablo diamond disk and some cutting fluid to help with the clogging..
      Where are you getting 13mm from? I see no mention of that in the article, nor in the video.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #33
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

        Where are you getting 13mm from? I see no mention of that in the article, nor in the video.
        Post #12 with link to Nature. (Techno-babble warning)
        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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        • #34
          Yeah, ok. I'll wait in the wings while some thief comes along with a water jet cutter to steal a bicycle-

          But I'll bet you can come along with a C-clamp and you'll be all set for the Tour De France
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #35
            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

            Post #12 with link to Nature. (Techno-babble warning)
            Yes, I see now. My bad for overlooking that. First thought I had was, "I can overcome that with a cold chisel and my favorite (1 kg) hammer"
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #36
              Diamond cant get it? Come on!!

              I use PCD stictly for aluminum.

              Let me at that sheet of foam with one of my newer cutters.

              Might be slow going to eat the ceramic balls with my diamond. Not in a hurry.

              Ok, silicon slicing blades from the electronic chip industry. Very small curf blades, diamond.

              Many ways to crack a nut they said. Who knows. JR

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              • #37
                You guys know this "impossible to cut" rhetoric is just advertising and marketing.
                The sheep need to stop believing it.

                -D
                DZER

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                • #38
                  This is similar to placing riprap rocks above a tunnel entrance to prevent an aerial bomb or missile from penetrating the top of the tunnel. This causes the bomb or missile to break up and spall rather than explode with full force. Simple use of rock to deflect. The balls in the media cause the cutting surface to deflect and wear making it not as effective. The balls are harder than the support media and deflects the cutter. Think of hitting carbide spots when machining iron. It destroys the cutting face.

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                  • #39
                    A few years ago I remember there was some new armor material (vehicular) developed to counter the roadside explosive devices (IED's) that were taking a toll on our troops in Iraq. I recall the foamed aluminum material was a key element, but don't remember what, if any, other components were involved. That's what first came to mind when this thread started.
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                    • #40
                      Man .. I would hate to bring a new invention here, you guys are brutal.
                      John Titor, when are you.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by darryl View Post
                        Yeah, ok. I'll wait in the wings while some thief comes along with a water jet cutter to steal a bicycle-

                        But I'll bet you can come along with a C-clamp and you'll be all set for the Tour De France
                        I have a portable plasma cutter. Ill just remove a lil bit of the bike to take it all. JR

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by mc_n_g View Post
                          The balls in the media cause the cutting surface to deflect and wear making it not as effective. The balls are harder than the support media and deflects the cutter. Think of hitting carbide spots when machining iron. It destroys the cutting face.
                          I get it now, thank you. I think you nailed it. I have run into a similar issue where the "aggregate" was causing me some issues with tolerances.

                          Thanks, JR
                          Last edited by JRouche; 07-24-2020, 12:50 AM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                            A few years ago I remember there was some new armor material (vehicular) developed to counter the roadside explosive devices (IED's) that were taking a toll on our troops in Iraq. I recall the foamed aluminum material was a key element, but don't remember what, if any, other components were involved. That's what first came to mind when this thread started.
                            There was a material where they used a slightly porous alumina ceramic and infused it with aluminum metal. Basically they take the piece od ceramic and set a chunk of aluminum ( I assume pure) and put it in a vacuum furnace. It melts and the ceramic wicks it up. You ended up with something as hard as ceramic but not brittle. Great for armor.

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                            • #44
                              there was a time where "ceramic" brake rotors were popular in racing. it was a mix of aluminum and silicon (sand?), impossible to machine without pcd but would melt easily (sometimes on the track). the material discussed here could be melted with a torch.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
                                Man .. I would hate to bring a new invention here, you guys are brutal.
                                Well the issue is Mike. It is not a new invention. JR

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