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  • Oh, crap ... did I really do that?

    I found this beefy 6" C-clamp at the dump. "A bit" rusty, though, so I put it in the muriatic acid bucket. And forgot about it until the next morning!! The acid took off all the exposed threads on the screw, but the frame threads are fine. I guess I'll have a try at making square threads.

    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    It will buff out fine!
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      just use for the range that you have threads.
      Ed
      Agua Dulce, So.California
      1950 F1 street rod
      1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
      1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
      1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
      1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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      • #4
        Never saw that happen before. From my experience with muriatic acid once the rust has been dissolved and that usually happens quickly the acid's effect on clean steel is very slow. Worst I've seen is the steel turns orange, some steel even turns black. The threads must have been pretty pitted and had a lot of porosity for the acid to completely dissolve them.
        At this point I would scrap it. Not worth the effort to try and salvage.
        The hole where the handle goes through looks to be pretty well hogged out too. You'll need to make bigger balls for the end of it so it doesn't slip through.

        JL....................

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        • #5
          Looking on the bright side, you now have a lifetime supply of ferric chloride for etching copper alloys.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ed ke6bnl View Post
            just use for the range that you have threads.
            And what range might that be??

            JL..............

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
              Never saw that happen before. From my experience with muriatic acid once the rust has been dissolved and that usually happens quickly the acid's effect on clean steel is very slow. Worst I've seen is the steel turns orange, some steel even turns black. The threads must have been pretty pitted and had a lot of porosity for the acid to completely dissolve them.
              At this point I would scrap it. Not worth the effort to try and salvage.
              The hole where the handle goes through looks to be pretty well hogged out too. You'll need to make bigger balls for the end of it so it doesn't slip through.

              JL....................
              Yeah, same thought here.

              It seems as if the threads must have been more susceptible, because the remaining part of the screw, the minor diameter, does not seem to be markedly attacked. One would expect that all surfaces would be attacked to about the same degree, and that the overall diameter would be smaller, with a bumpy surface generally correspondig to the old threads.

              I would not expect the threads to corrode off clean.

              Maybe this was a valuable antique from the 1700s with a welded-on thread and not a cut thread at all!
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                The handle seems unaffected. ???

                On a positive note, if any one has some dead bodies that you want to dissapear
                then Bob is your go to guy.

                -Doozer
                DZER

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  Yeah, same thought here.

                  It seems as if the threads must have been more susceptible, because the remaining part of the screw, the minor diameter, does not seem to be markedly attacked. One would expect that all surfaces would be attacked to about the same degree, and that the overall diameter would be smaller, with a bumpy surface generally correspondig to the old threads.

                  I would not expect the threads to corrode off clean.

                  Maybe this was a valuable antique from the 1700s with a welded-on thread and not a cut thread at all!
                  Yes, it may have been an antique. What's left of the screw looks like wood !
                  It may be since the threads are three sided and if badly pitted the acid attacked them from three sides.

                  Is it possible that an antique clamp could have had a wood screw and square wire wrapped around it for threads?? I'm thinking no, but...... I've seen stranger things.

                  JL...............

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                    The handle seems unaffected. ???

                    On a positive note, if any one has some dead bodies that you want to dissapear Guess that's what happened to Jimmy Hoffa !!
                    then Bob is your go to guy.

                    -Doozer
                    The handle looks like it's a different material than the threads. Probably why the acid had less effect on it. Like I said on one of my previous posts once the rust is dissolved the acids effect on steel is very slow to nothing.


                    JL...................


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                    • #11
                      Does a magnet stick to that screw shaft?

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                      • #12
                        Cast iron screw?
                        “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                        Lewis Grizzard

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                          Yes, it may have been an antique. What's left of the screw looks like wood !
                          It may be since the threads are three sided and if badly pitted the acid attacked them from three sides.
                          JL...............
                          More likely it was made of wrought iron, if it has that much grain in it. Also, pretty much irreplaceable, last I heard you can't get genuine wrought iron any more.

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                          • #14
                            Here's a close up of the protected threads. Nothing suspicious, that I see.
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                            And the name on the frame isn't eaten away (as much):
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                            The part of the handle that is not corroded in the photo happened to not be submerged in the acid. But even the part that was submerged was not corroded as much as the thread.

                            Antique? I dunno, but the brand (Adjustable) is still being made.

                            As others have said, this was very unusual consequence of acid de-rusting. But I have had it happen before. Something about the material. I wonder if spark testing it would reveal anything. Or is there another test, one that would tell if it is wrought iron?

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                            • #15
                              Maybe leaded steel (12L14) does that in acid ????

                              -D
                              DZER

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