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rolling a rim on stainless

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  • rolling a rim on stainless

    I have a project in which I need to roll a lip on a stainless disc. My first thought was to pinch the disc between a faced end in the chuck and a live tailstock, then roll the edge over using either a blunt tool or a roller. These will be subsequently pressed into short sections of stainless tube to act as floors- capping the end basically, but on the ID.

    Is this something readily possible in stainless? The material is 030 thick. I wonder how much of a radius I should put on the faced piece held in the chuck- I'm thinking perhaps twice the material thickness. I would also use another disc between the live center and the disc that I'm pinching- large enough in diameter to resist the bending forces at that point.

    I know this is easy in aluminum, but I'm not sure what will happen with stainless. Will my 8x18 have enough oomph to keep the disc in place while its rolled?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    So you want to roll the edge over completely, 90 deg. fold and make it like a pan?

    There are a lot of companies that make weld in place stainless pipe caps. You might do some research there.
    Like this company here. Up to 8" in diameter. https://www.jmesales.com/dixon-sanit...SABEgIOmPD_BwE


    JL.....
    Last edited by JoeLee; 07-26-2020, 12:43 AM.

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    • #3
      Hand roller with tipping dies should do it.,

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      • #4
        Try making a male die and a female die from some MDF and then press it with the 2 dies, hammer form it first in the female die if you have to. Be sure to make the male die smaller than the final size so it will allow the metal to form when being pressed. You probably don't even need a frame press, a good size vice might do the trick.
        It will also depend on the type of SS, as some will form better than others. You might even try annealing the metal if it won't form easily.

        Good luck, and do let us know how it comes out.

        TX
        Mr fixit
        Chris

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        • #5
          I think your plan sounds feasible. I have spin formed even lot worse parts on a lathe.

          spin forming is a black magic itself but couple of trials and youtube videos should give you enough idea where and how to apply the pressure.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • #6
            Like this?

            Good Luck

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            • #7
              Metal spinning lathe and the proper forming tools. A crap ton of them were just auctioned two weeks ago in the Bronx.

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              • #8
                Bented- that's it. Doesn't have to be that precise looking. It needs to be a press fit, but if I can roll the lip over I can always machine the OD a bit before pressing it in.

                The other option of course is to make a male and female die and just form the part in the press. I'd have to machine the die parts anyway, so it's half of one and two of another.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  The other option of course is to make a male and female die and just form the part in the press. I'd have to machine the die parts anyway, so it's half of one and two of another.
                  How many thousands of parts are required? If you are contemplating building dies and punches then setting up a press there must be many.
                  Last edited by Bented; 07-26-2020, 06:54 PM.

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                  • #10
                    No, there are not many- perhaps 6 or 10. I may not do this at all, if my time has dollar value in other projects. I mainly wanted to know if this is something that I could do with my lathe- and with this material. If I do go ahead and make up the die parts, it won't be from anything exotic- it would be hot rolled rod and plate. It would be a typical operation where forming the part would take 10 seconds, but the prep would take an hour or more. I've never done any metal spinning, so it would be a learning experience.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Took about half an hour including the scrap pile foraging and annealing the stainless blank
                      Attached Files
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        I had bit of taper left on the straight part but with couple of more trials or anneal between the forming passes you can do probably better than that.
                        Did that on 11x24 Kerry and didn't feel like I have to push it to the limit. So 8x16 chinesium might do it as well.
                        Last edited by MattiJ; 07-27-2020, 06:00 AM.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #13
                          Another option is to make them from a solid bar if weight is not a factor.

                          Saw a piece of suitable diameter round.
                          Turn OD and face.
                          Face groove to depth and diameter.
                          Saw off slightly longer or part off is small enough.
                          Face saw cut to length.

                          No dies, no annealing, no forming and no cutting of sheet metal, much faster for a handful of parts using existing tooling.
                          Last edited by Bented; 07-27-2020, 06:07 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Solid bar... maybe if these are enough small. Like 1” for 8x18 lathe. Anything larger is probably slower than forming on a small low power lathe.
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                            • #15
                              what did you form them with? that ball bearing?

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