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one more technique for dealing with slivers

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  • one more technique for dealing with slivers

    In addition to metalworking I am also interested in cooking. Today I was reading an older Mexican cookbook. In the section where she described how to deal with nopales (prickly pear cactus leaves), she says if you get one of the small sharp spines embedded in your skin, start with a piece of tape (like we do) and if that fails, run your hand several times through your hair (assuming you are so blessed, as some of us probably are not).

    Add running your fingers through your hair to your arsenal of tools to try against slivers.

    metalmagpie

  • #2
    Aha! so that's why I keep picking slivers out of my hair.

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    • #3
      I have a good crop of spineless cactus. All started from a single "leaf" about 20 years ago. Beats having to deal with "stickers". In the shop, I always use tape. Seems like the older the tape, the better it works. Gooey works better. Not mine but here's a video of the type of cactus I have: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=copwVm4nyK4

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
        I have a good crop of spineless cactus. All started from a single "leaf" about 20 years ago. Beats having to deal with "stickers". In the shop, I always use tape. Seems like the older the tape, the better it works. Gooey works better. Not mine but here's a video of the type of cactus I have: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=copwVm4nyK4
        You have the yellow flowered or the red? Ours are spiny and yellow flowered.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #5
          My favorite tools for metal slivers are a 10X magnifier and an X-acto knife with a #11 blade. A bit of alcohol for cleaning and disinfecting, of course. I have tried adhesive tape but had little success. Same with magnets. Sorry, but the job usually requires surgery.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            My favorite tools for metal slivers are a 10X magnifier and an X-acto knife with a #11 blade. A bit of alcohol for cleaning and disinfecting, of course. I have tried adhesive tape but had little success. Same with magnets. Sorry, but the job usually requires surgery.
            I’m with you on this one. I use a stereo microscope for the magnification. Exacto knife is the perfect tool. Can’t say I ever used a disinfectant unless after a deep dive.

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            • #7
              I was just doing some plumbing and had a thought, ABS glue. That stuff almost becomes part of your body so maybe a little on the sliver, let it dry, then remove (or try to).

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              • #8
                I used a ordinary tweezers, you set the end on a vise and smack it with a hammer to flatten it. Now grind the end and you have a tweezers that will close tight together and grab vary small slivers.

                Jon
                SW Mi

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                • #9
                  I use a piece of emory cloth and give it a quick jerk across the slither. Works pretty good.

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                  • #10
                    You can also use white glue. Just let it dry and then peel it off. CA also works, but it's harder to remove- although it will probably grab the sliver better. Either way, it is helpful if you know which way the sliver went in- you want to pull it out the same way instead of potentially breaking it off.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Stereo zoom microscope and sharp exacto knife, sometimes a watchmakers tweezers. Depending on the activity, sometimes after a day in the shop I'll find several....not ones causing enough pain be that noticeable, but all slightly irritating/sore...feels better with them out
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cheap Jon View Post
                        I used a ordinary tweezers, you set the end on a vise and smack it with a hammer to flatten it. Now grind the end and you have a tweezers that will close tight together and grab vary small slivers.

                        Jon
                        SW Mi
                        Yup you can't beat precision tweezers and were machinist so we can fine tune our own,,, I don't smack with a hammer though --- I slip some 400 grit sandpaper in between the jaws and close then drag outward, then flip it and repeat - then back to original side one more time, then grind the ends while closed - then take a stone to them and create a mild arc, these will take out anything protruding,,,

                        if you happen to be a poor slob that gets one that's buried under the surface then it's time to go in with the razor knife, go in a little like at a 45 degree angle and once you hit it then arc the blade more aggressive and kinda pry it out, works more of the time right off but sometimes you have to go deeper - you have to do what you have to do because you sure can't leave it in there it will drive you nutz...

                        Iv never heard of anyone using their hair - just sounds stupid --- so you got something in your hand that you have access to with tweezers and eye glasses and incredible control yet you think it would be a good idea to transfer it to the top of your head where you cannot even see it - brilliant...

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                        • #13
                          up to now i have been successful with calipers.

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                          • #14
                            You all are missing the boat on splinter removal by not using a hypodermic needle. We have them in many different gauges because of our horses. They are the weapon of choice for splinters.
                            Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                            • #15
                              I get them in the foot. 90 year old wood floors. you have to be a contortionist.

                              in the hand, exacto knife and a magnifying light

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