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one more technique for dealing with slivers

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by AD5MB View Post
    I get them in the foot. 90 year old wood floors. you have to be a contortionist.

    in the hand, exacto knife and a magnifying light
    The aging joints would never let me manage that. I'm thinking that a USB camera/microscope rig would be a handy thing to have for that sort of thing. I can reach down to the sole of my foot but I can't bend around well enough to see what I'd need to see.

    For stuff in the hand the magnifying hood I bought a few years back has come in very handy.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Those are powerful magnets --- never used them for sliver extraction but will keep in mind although I do more SS than iron/steel so might not help sometimes...

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  • davidwdyer
    replied
    A little off topic but... A friend of mind filled his eye with metal bits grinding without eye protection. The ophthalmologist got some of them out

    but he continued to be in a lot of pain. So I gave him my magnet from an old hard drive. After a quick application of alcohol, he lightly pressed it againt

    his cornea. It came off full of little metal bits. After a few applications, he was pain free.

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  • dian
    replied
    if you use dmso it wont infect and comes out anyway.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    When all else fails, leave it in. As it gets infected, it will eventually slide right out in the pus blob. Works reliably, if perhaps a bit of a mess.

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  • AD5MB
    replied
    I get them in the foot. 90 year old wood floors. you have to be a contortionist.

    in the hand, exacto knife and a magnifying light

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    You all are missing the boat on splinter removal by not using a hypodermic needle. We have them in many different gauges because of our horses. They are the weapon of choice for splinters.

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  • dian
    replied
    up to now i have been successful with calipers.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Cheap Jon View Post
    I used a ordinary tweezers, you set the end on a vise and smack it with a hammer to flatten it. Now grind the end and you have a tweezers that will close tight together and grab vary small slivers.

    Jon
    SW Mi
    Yup you can't beat precision tweezers and were machinist so we can fine tune our own,,, I don't smack with a hammer though --- I slip some 400 grit sandpaper in between the jaws and close then drag outward, then flip it and repeat - then back to original side one more time, then grind the ends while closed - then take a stone to them and create a mild arc, these will take out anything protruding,,,

    if you happen to be a poor slob that gets one that's buried under the surface then it's time to go in with the razor knife, go in a little like at a 45 degree angle and once you hit it then arc the blade more aggressive and kinda pry it out, works more of the time right off but sometimes you have to go deeper - you have to do what you have to do because you sure can't leave it in there it will drive you nutz...

    Iv never heard of anyone using their hair - just sounds stupid --- so you got something in your hand that you have access to with tweezers and eye glasses and incredible control yet you think it would be a good idea to transfer it to the top of your head where you cannot even see it - brilliant...

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Stereo zoom microscope and sharp exacto knife, sometimes a watchmakers tweezers. Depending on the activity, sometimes after a day in the shop I'll find several....not ones causing enough pain be that noticeable, but all slightly irritating/sore...feels better with them out

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  • darryl
    replied
    You can also use white glue. Just let it dry and then peel it off. CA also works, but it's harder to remove- although it will probably grab the sliver better. Either way, it is helpful if you know which way the sliver went in- you want to pull it out the same way instead of potentially breaking it off.

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  • ImFred
    replied
    I use a piece of emory cloth and give it a quick jerk across the slither. Works pretty good.

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  • Cheap Jon
    replied
    I used a ordinary tweezers, you set the end on a vise and smack it with a hammer to flatten it. Now grind the end and you have a tweezers that will close tight together and grab vary small slivers.

    Jon
    SW Mi

    Leave a comment:


  • Ridgerunner
    replied
    I was just doing some plumbing and had a thought, ABS glue. That stuff almost becomes part of your body so maybe a little on the sliver, let it dry, then remove (or try to).

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  • rickyb
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    My favorite tools for metal slivers are a 10X magnifier and an X-acto knife with a #11 blade. A bit of alcohol for cleaning and disinfecting, of course. I have tried adhesive tape but had little success. Same with magnets. Sorry, but the job usually requires surgery.
    I’m with you on this one. I use a stereo microscope for the magnification. Exacto knife is the perfect tool. Can’t say I ever used a disinfectant unless after a deep dive.

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