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Building RPC from Ebay kit

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  • Building RPC from Ebay kit

    I have a 5hp 3ph motor that I just put new bearings in.
    I initially had trouble removing the end bells, but got that all sorted out in a prior thread.

    Now I'm moving on to the build of the RPC control box.
    I ordered a DIY kit from Ebay.
    ​​​​​​https://www.ebay.com/itm/5HP-Rotary-...YAAOSwopRYlQU4
    I'm anxious to see how this goes.
    It is the wire schematic that I am most interested in, because all the internal parts can be had from any local HVAC supplier, without the sellers shipping and markup.
    I felt I needed that schematic to indicate the values of capacitors, was my biggest concern
    So, I just ordered the ebay kit.

  • #2
    I believe the one my boy got me for my 7 hp 3 phase motor cost about $100 complete in a box. ebay
    Ed
    Agua Dulce, So.California
    1950 F1 street rod
    1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
    1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
    1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
    1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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    • #3
      I just bought a static phase converter from WNY and they also sell RPC and kits for RPCs. Looks like their 5 hp RPC kit is just under $80. http://phaseconverterusa.com/Phase-C...yle-_c_23.html No financial interest, just a paying customer (have one of the 1-3 hp statics and a 3 -10 hp static on the way). Their website says "out of stock" on everything - takes them about 3 days to asm/ship.
      Metro Detroit

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      • #4
        I wish I saw that website earlier, they are free shipping

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        • #5
          I have had one of the gold series panels from them for about 5 years, absolutely no issues and am very pleased.

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          • #6
            I have this motor with the peckerhead apart, the 9-wires are not marked well, mostly unidentifiable
            It is at this time wired for 230v.
            Per the data plate, I know that 4-5-6 are tied together as is 1-7, 2-8, 3-9.
            But, I prefer to freshly label all 9 wires individually.
            I have not yet un-connected any of them, so as to maintain a known good 230v make up.
            Does anyone know of a easy/good test with a Fluke meter to identify the wire numbers on continuity test?
            All the tests on individual wires should be either continuity or open.
            but which wire number corresponds to a correct label?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ringo View Post
              I have this motor with the peckerhead apart, the 9-wires are not marked well, mostly unidentifiable
              It is at this time wired for 230v.
              Per the data plate, I know that 4-5-6 are tied together as is 1-7, 2-8, 3-9.
              But, I prefer to freshly label all 9 wires individually.
              I have not yet un-connected any of them, so as to maintain a known good 230v make up.
              Does anyone know of a easy/good test with a Fluke meter to identify the wire numbers on continuity test?
              All the tests on individual wires should be either continuity or open.
              but which wire number corresponds to a correct label?
              I found this,and it looks like what you are looking for:
              https://electronics.stackexchange.co...a-9-lead-motor

              Steve

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              • #8
                I found something that should help, although it may be a bit more complex than necessary:

                http://www.rses.org/assets/serviceap...ual/620-37.pdf

                Another helpful document:

                https://faceitsalon.com/3-phase-moto...gram-12-leads/

                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by doctor demo View Post

                  I found this,and it looks like what you are looking for:
                  https://electronics.stackexchange.co...a-9-lead-motor

                  Steve
                  yes, that was good,
                  I see I have the low volt Y arrangement
                  I was able to identify 3 of 9 wires and because it was already connected, process of elimination gave me several more ID's.
                  It boiled down to find #2 & 8.
                  Easy enough to ohm out that.
                  also it a cool science experiment, I saw that ohm meter on the field wires, you can turn the shaft and see ohms generated. If you were good at math, with a pointer on the shaft, you may be able to determine the shaft clocking by looking at the ohm reading. kinda cool.
                  you didnt even have to rotate the shaft, just rock it back an forth to see ohms moving.
                  I took out that stubby short wires and put in a length of SOO cable to reach the RPC control box. a much cleaner looking installation now

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                  • #10
                    Small point, Ringo - ohms can't be generated. What happens is that voltage is generated when you turn the shaft and that voltage causes an erroneous resistance reading since that voltage and the voltage applied by the meter either add or subtract.

                    -js
                    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                    Location: SF Bay Area

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                    • #11
                      It might be possible to energize the windings with an AC signal, and use a scope to see which ones are related and their relative phasing. But mostly I think this might only be able to identify those which are bifilar wound to be connected in series or parallel. They would be most tightly coupled and should provide the highest voltage with minimal phase shift. I have seen a device which would provide a three phase signal shifted by a precise phase angle by adjusting the rotor with respect to the stator, but I think it would need to be a synchronous machine. You can see it on a bench in the background of this picture from where I worked 45 years ago:

                      Click image for larger version

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                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • #12
                        I've tried to find more information about this. Closest thing so far:

                        https://www.labvolt.com/solutions/50...hift_indicator

                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #13
                          yeah, I know, you dont 'generate' ohms, but I'm a high school guy that been doing avionics for many years.
                          that's an old term I used to get back at the engineers stuff that didnt work.
                          I was quite surprised though such a small movement on the shaft effected the ohms (voltage, whatever) to such a easily visable degree.
                          At the end of my career I worked with strain gauges, now that there is some really small millivolts,,,,,,,,readings out to where you no longer see volts but rather micro-strains.
                          What I saw today was with a plain Fluke, simple and straightforward
                          I spun it up with a hand drill and read voltage just spinning it. I read about motor theory but never really dug into it.
                          And then some things I just 'gotta see to believe', and that is running a 3ph motor on 1ph input.
                          Yup, I Ruby Goldberg'd 220v 1ph to the T1 & T2 inputs and it sure enough runs.
                          And, I saw a 208v generated on the T3 output.

                          So, in theory, with what I got right now, I could hook up my 3ph mill motor to my Ruby Goldberg RPC, and turn on the mill motor, correct?
                          And nothing will blow up, correct?

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                          • #14
                            It should work OK, but might bog down under a heavy load. That's where run capacitors can help to boost the third leg voltage and phase.
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #15
                              I been using hand drill as the pony motor.
                              I am curious enough to want to see it in it's stone hammer simple form.
                              Tomorrow I play with the pull rope version.

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