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  • #31
    Originally posted by Bented View Post

    What do you do for a living?
    I work 40-50 hours in a machine shop every week, the last thing that I want to do when not working is watch parts/tools rotate, will not do so after leaving work.
    Have a few close friends that are hobby shop types that I help on occasion, one builds model engines. I lend or give him measuring and cutting tools when needed, when he runs into a process that isn't working for him he will ask.

    Can you come over to my garage and show me how to do this with my 1940 SB lathe?
    My answer is always, No, but give me the part and I will make it happen and you can have it in 2 days, this makes everyone happy.

    I do not keep so much as a tape measure at home.
    I do not want to measure anything when not working.
    There would seem to be an inconsistency here. If you want nothing to do with machining after leaving the work place, as you indicate, which is perfectly understandable, then why the hell would you want to spend your time on this "Home Shop Machinist" forum discussing machining topics?
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #32
      Bented, Just a reminder, the name of this forum and website is HOME SHOP MACHINIST. Just because you cannot fathom any other use for a Sherline does not mean that home hobbyists cannot.

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      • #33
        Bented seems to have forgotten, or never looked at, the header on this page. I noticed his thought about R8 (which I actually share, I don't much want an R8 machine either) and observe that it is worse than I believed.

        Therefore, he does not fully realize that this is the "Home Shop Machinist" forum. (Perhaps PM would be a better forum for his tastes, but far be it from me to make him uncomfortable here.)

        That fact may affect the attitude brought to the posts. For instance, the "frail little machine" he thinks is good only for graphite (I am very aware of EDM electrodes, thank you), is of course actually used for fine work in many materials. Just because the machine does not hog 8 cubic inches of steel per minute, does not make it irrelevant here. "Industry" is not exclusively heavy machining, or CNC, and Schaublin, for instance, knows that (they certainly are not focused on the hobby market with their 70CF and 102 small manual machines).

        And, that is bound to affect the answers he considers adequate or suitable to the OP here in this thread. Most of the rest of us understand what was asked, and what is wanted.

        It's not really Bented's fault, it is just his background and that naturally affects how he sees the matter.

        As for that "show me how to do it on my 1940s SB lathe in the garage", well, many here probably could show that. The statement is loaded with a "subtext" that considers "hobby" folks to be, as a group, 5 or ten levels below "professionals". That is true of many, but certainly not all, and a goodly number of folks here would surprise the "professionals".

        I think the thread needs a restart, but maybe we already answered the OP sufficiently.

        I see I am not the only one who noticed...........
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #34
          If you're looking at a PM-25, I'd suggest looking at the PM-727 (esp. the variable speed model) and the PM-30. Work envelope is a bit bigger, more mass = bigger cuts/ better finish, and at least one of them (PM-30 from memory) is belt drive variable speed, which is REALLY nice to have. Quieter and easier to tweak the speed to get the cutter working the way you want it. That said, plenty of people get the PM-25 (or G704 which is the Grizzly equivalent I think) and are happy with them.

          As others have said, budget at least 1/3 of the mill price for tooling. 100% would be better, but you know, can't always have what you want

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          • #35
            Originally posted by lynnl View Post

            There would seem to be an inconsistency here. If you want nothing to do with machining after leaving the work place, as you indicate, which is perfectly understandable, then why the hell would you want to spend your time on this "Home Shop Machinist" forum discussing machining topics?
            Boredom during a global viral pandemic, I also can not seem to develop an interest in line dancing, knitting, stamp collecting, bird watching, cooking, fishing (not to be confused with fisting or phishing), sodoku, celebrities, dead celebrities, wall paper, the history of the Planters Peanut Corporation (as interesting as it is), professional sports which are off the table currently, Kim Kardashian, the letter Q and numbers that end with the digit 3.

            Machining is the only thing that I know well after 30 years in the business so can give educated opinions, I do not know Kim Kardashian's shoe size and can not help anyone with a burning desire for this knowledge.

            Yes, I bulls#it for fun, however when giving actual machining advice I stick to exactly what has worked or not worked for me in the past., no bull.

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            • #36
              I like seeing your commercial stuff here, no issue from me, but keep in mind if you have zero home shop interest and experience, don't be so quick to judge what people have and come up with equipment wise.....its just apples and oranges to a large degree with what you find useful in a commercial machine shop. Many talented sorts have proven light little machines can produce amazing work....just not in the same time frame as commercial equipment
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #37
                I very much appreciate Bented's experience and willingness to share. And his sense of humour, which many here seem not to understand.

                -js
                There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                Location: SF Bay Area

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                  I like seeing your commercial stuff here, no issue from me, but keep in mind if you have zero home shop interest and experience, don't be so quick to judge
                  I do not judge anyone on equipment or ability.
                  The typical question is What Machine Should I Buy? or How Do I Do This With Existing Equipment.

                  Often these questions supply little information as to what the poster means, when I see benchtop mill I think Haas Office mill, very small, on wheels , single phase power.
                  Who would not love such a machine.
                  https://www.haascnc.com/machines/ver...ktop-mill.html

                  How Do I Do This with existing equipment?
                  If you do not have suitably sized equipment it will not work at all, machine will not hold the part.

                  One can swing a 36" part through the gap of a 24" swing lathe, however you can not pass the carriage under such a part, the length is very limited.
                  I often resort to a boring bar held upside down with the spindle in reverse rotation, rotate the tool post 180 degrees and mount the tool on the outside if the cross slide will not move far enough.

                  I have done a good deal of Make It Happen jobs over the years.




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                  • #39
                    Would anyone have any suggestions on benchtop mill name brands, except Grizzly? I can really start my research then. Thanks.
                    Last edited by lovemesomemachines; 08-01-2020, 10:12 PM.

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                    • #40

                      Haas makes excellent machines https://www.haascnc.com/machines/ver...ktop-mill.html
                      Small and cheap.


                      There must be others that make small milling machines for the manufacture of very small parts, think mechanical wrist watches, small electronic components and medical devices.

                      Not one single brand comes to mind, I have never worked in the small part industry where a bench top sized machine would be used so I know nothing about such tools.
                      Last edited by Bented; 08-01-2020, 10:44 PM.

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                      • #41
                        Well ****, for how much I put into my Taig, could of gotten a Haas Desktop mill.

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                        • #42
                          I've done that boring bar trick before, to clean up a part that just barely would fit over the ways. That is one of the things that home shop folks get used to dealing with, partly because of getting a machine that seems big enough at first. In business, time is money. In the hobby type shop, or even a shop doing commercial model work, time often substitutes for money. A different approach.

                          I'd consider refurbishing a smaller Bullard type machine to handle bigger stuff (it tends to be short length if large diameter), but there is an active market, and they are apparently in demand. Not found at my level of price/condition/size. The smallest similar type made seems to have been a 24" or so, but they are not common at the smaller end of the range. ( I have seen pictures of a 12" unit, but I have no idea what it's purpose could have been)

                          Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                          I like seeing your commercial stuff here, no issue from me, but keep in mind if you have zero home shop interest and experience, don't be so quick to judge what people have and come up with equipment wise.....its just apples and oranges to a large degree with what you find useful in a commercial machine shop. Many talented sorts have proven light little machines can produce amazing work....just not in the same time frame as commercial equipment
                          Well put, and I agree.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 08-02-2020, 12:25 AM.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
                            Would anyone have any suggestions on benchtop mill name brands, except Grizzly? I can really start my research then. Thanks.
                            didnt read the whole "interesting" thread, but if you consider a used machine, you might look here as to what has been made:

                            http://www.lathes.co.uk/page21.html

                            if not, a lot of stuff comes up when googling, e.g.

                            https://wenproducts.com/products/330...illing-machine

                            a "brand" that comes to mind is jet:

                            https://www.jettools.com/us/en/c/met...r=1&reset=true

                            keep in mind that there are not so many generic far eastern products, sold by different dealers under different brands. maybe look at a 3-in-1 machine?

                            edit: there are several european brands, im sure you can find equivalents over there: wabeco, proma, promax, optimum, bernardo, paulimont, knuth, holzmann.
                            to give you an idea whats out there: http://www.haessig-maschinen.ch/frae...-300-mit-digi/
                            Last edited by dian; 08-02-2020, 02:25 AM.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                              I'd consider refurbishing a smaller Bullard type machine to handle bigger stuff (it tends to be short length if large diameter), but there is an active market, and they are apparently in demand. N
                              We once had a 36" Bullard VTL, it went into the scrap about 10 years ago, on occasion it is sorely missed as you can imagine.

                              I believe this is one of the reasons my employer accepts some of this work.

                              32" Diameter X 1/2" thick plate with face grooves, counter bores and OD grooves.

                              Yes we can do it he says, then oh sh!t, we don't have that VTL anymore. Hey you, put this in that big engine lathe and make it happen, this often takes far longer then expected. Tears are often shed.
                              Last edited by Bented; 08-02-2020, 08:48 AM.

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                              • #45
                                Bented, at the risk of further making Brian's hat size swell from the compliments you should do a search on the HSM forum for Brian Rupnow's postings. Then go look at his posts describing his modest size machines that turn out this really amazing work. HOME shops and HOME shop projects come in all sizes.

                                A long time contributor to HSM and the other magazine is Rudy Kouhoupt that only ever had smaller table top machines as far as I can make out. Yet he too turned out an incredible array of machine models.

                                And finally you surely realize that a pretty impressive amount of work has been done on watch and clock maker's lathes over the past couple of centuries?.... It's not always about having the biggest. It's what we do with what we have and how much room we have to put it all. Such is the plight of a HOME shop machinist. Perhaps take a few moments to come down off your commercial sized pedestal and hobnob with the rank and file?
                                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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