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  • #46
    Hi,

    To the OP, there are some questions you must answer for yourself to figure out if a particular machine is what you will buy.

    First, determine the size work you MOSTLY want to do. Whether this is clock making, model engineering, repairing larger machines like farm or industrial and just how fast do you want to do it.Then understand that at some point something will cross your path that you cannot do with your current machine. Adjust your damage to wallet accordingly.

    When you do finally go shopping, understand it's far less about buying a particular machine. What you are buying is the dealer when you purchase a new machine. Badges and paint color are meaningless if there is no dealer support. When you buy used, YOU are the warranty and support. remember the phrase - "As IS - Where IS" when buying used.

    As an example. When I decided to setup my little home shop, I determined that I will not machine any lump that I cannot hold in one hand. So imagine a piece of steel 6x6x12". Nothing bigger for me. I started out buying a HF8x14" lathe. Fit's my work envelope and didn't cost much. I understood that if there were problems with the machine I understood there would be no help or parts from Harbor Freight. When I bought my mill, I bought a Grizzly G0704 because the price was good, (it was on sale), and I wanted the warranty and parts support. And they have a reputation for customer service, (not that I've needed any).

    And finally, just because you might start out with a small benchtop machine doesn't mean that some day you might need and buy a 10,000lbs unit.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #47
      OP, check this out:

      https://littlemachineshop.com/Info/minimill_compare.php

      https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ProductID=3990

      for my needs anything less is not enough and anything more is excessive

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by AD5MB View Post
        OP, check this out:

        https://littlemachineshop.com/Info/minimill_compare.php

        https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ProductID=3990

        for my needs anything less is not enough and anything more is excessive
        It is all Sieg made machines, that is what they sell. This is misleading, because every single mill is in fact made by Sieg in that comparison. They all suffer from the basic design flaws of a Sieg product.
        Last edited by RB211; 08-02-2020, 02:56 PM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

          It is all Sieg made machines, that is what they sell.
          And....................??
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

            And....................??
            If that means nothing to you, then I am not going to waste any more time with this.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by RB211 View Post

              If that means nothing to you, then I am not going to waste any more time with this.
              It means that you allege that they are all made by a vendor in the PRC which you consider to be a low quality vendor (and you may be right).

              It says nothing about the OTHER vendors actual manufacturer. They may be better, or worse. Yes, it is possible to be worse than Sieg.

              And the "not going to waste any more time with this" is a gratuitous insult which I will not forget.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                It means that you allege that they are all made by a vendor in the PRC which you consider to be a low quality vendor (and you may be right).

                It says nothing about the OTHER vendors actual manufacturer. They may be better, or worse. Yes, it is possible to be worse than Sieg.

                And the "not going to waste any more time with this" is a gratuitous insult which I will not forget.
                Nope, no one else replicates what Sieg makes. Even the Chinese have standards

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                • #53
                  I didn't see the Precision Matthews PM-728VT Ultra Precision Milling Machine. Looks really nice. I think this is about the largest I can get without having to go with a 220V single phase 20A circuit, which I don't have, which the Precision Matthews PM-835S Milling Machine requires, which I really like by the way. Decent warranties as well; much needed. I'm just wondering, has anyone kept their mill in an unheated/un-airconditioned garage all year round with cold winters and hot muggy summers? If so, what do you do about protecting it from rust?
                  Last edited by lovemesomemachines; 08-02-2020, 10:43 PM.

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                  • #54
                    Dehumidifiers are your friend, mine works great
                    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                    Oregon, USA

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                    • #55
                      Tim...may I ask what type of dehumidifier you are using? Any specific size or brand? Industrial maybe?
                      Last edited by lovemesomemachines; 08-02-2020, 10:47 PM.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                        Nope, no one else replicates what Sieg makes. Even the Chinese have standards
                        HMMMMM.

                        Most of the chinese stuff I have seen has been at least credible LOOKING. May be (and has been ) out of spec when measured.

                        I have seen tooling from India that appeared to have been chewed out of scrap by a drunken squirrel with dull teeth and no blueprint. The issue of measuring for spec dimensions never even came up, and one's "calibrated eye" was not needed. One wonders if some of their machines are that bad.

                        Remember, a great way to grind the chuck jaws is to tack weld the jaws to the chuck body while they re clamped on a ring. You can just turn the ring away before grinding, the jaws. Simple matter to grind the tack welds away with an angle grinder........ OK that was in Pakistan............. which used to be part of India......
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          First, my opinion about PM: I've read a lot of posts from a lot of people. The majority of the complaints relate to the fact that the machinery is shipped from China to the USA and forwarded to the users without even being opened, inspected, cleaned or adjusted. PM does a great job of making people happy when they rectify the problems, but don't seem to do anything to prevent the problems. That forms a body of customers who praise the after sales service. There should never be a need for corrective after sales service on a $2500 machine.

                          Grizzley sells basically the same machines as PM, JET and several others that don't come to mind. For a bench top machine, you'll be talking about a 125 lb to 600 lb device. Virtually all will be a bed mill where the table moves back and forth and the head goes up and down on a post. That post can be square with dovetails which will lock in the alignment of the head. It can be a round tube which also works but does not have an integral way to align the head after it moves.

                          The grizzly web catalog is good for comparing machines. For example, you can look at the basic small (not miniature) "mini mill" Grizzly G8689 4" x 16" Mini Milling Machine and compare it's features and specs against the ones that resemble the PM25 machines. The mini mill at 125 lbs is capable within it's work envelope in steel, plastic, wood and aluminum. As you get bigger machines you will find that they are capable of cutting bigger chunks and do the same work in less time. The Grizzly G0761 10" x 32" 2 HP HD Benchtop Mill/Drill with Power Feed and Tapping is close to the PM25 series, and will handle bigger work faster, but at 600 lbs you will need a well reinforced bench or stand.

                          I have several friends who have made some nice tools, toys and parts on the mini-mill.

                          Dan



                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                          Location: SF East Bay.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                            Well ****, for how much I put into my Taig, could of gotten a Haas Desktop mill.
                            $6,000.00 for the control, $1,000.00 for the machine.
                            If your machine, (I have no idea what Taig is) is capable of running more then wax and plastic models then you are ahead of the game, the conversational control is a big plus however, you can fingercam complicated parts at the machine, all that is required is the dimensions.
                            Last edited by Bented; 08-03-2020, 02:36 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                              You hit the nail on the head.
                              I have several friends that works for Conrail. Off the job, they could care less about steam locomotives, rail museums, rail-fan trips,engine spotting, model railroads or anything related to their day job.
                              So, perhaps they are on the wrong forum then?
                              Ya know, the clue is in the name - HOME SHOP MACHINIST.....
                              This is not PM.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Bented View Post

                                What do you do for a living?
                                I work 40-50 hours in a machine shop every week, the last thing that I want to do when not working is watch parts/tools rotate, will not do so after leaving work.
                                Have a few close friends that are hobby shop types that I help on occasion, one builds model engines. I lend or give him measuring and cutting tools when needed, when he runs into a process that isn't working for him he will ask.

                                Can you come over to my garage and show me how to do this with my 1940 SB lathe?
                                My answer is always, No, but give me the part and I will make it happen and you can have it in 2 days, this makes everyone happy.

                                I do not keep so much as a tape measure at home.
                                I do not want to measure anything when not working.
                                I fail to understand why you waste your free time on a forum devoted mainly to HOME SHOP MACHINING.
                                I enjoy reading and seeing other posters Monarch's, Bridgeports, Southbend model 9A's, Atlas 7" and Elliot 14" shapers, etc etc, and what they get up to with them.
                                I have zero interest in a CNC $1 million dollar machining box at your place of work making parts i cannot quantify unless you've explained what they actually are.
                                And telling me speeds and feeds and DOC and super duper toolbits (not purchased out of your own wallet) on exotic materials that have ZERO relevance to me and my machines in my shed.
                                Sorry, horses for courses.

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