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  • #61
    Hey Folks! Good morning. Just thought I'd throw in a positive note here.

    Nice people are nice people. Grouches are grouches. It's up to the nice folks to ignore the grouches and eventually they drop the subject. It's nice to hear the pros talk of what they can do. After all, every process used in a commercial shop can be applied in some way to home shops. Maybe it's a direct application and sometimes it just inspires us to try other techniques.

    So let's be nice and we all win.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
      I'm just wondering, has anyone kept their mill in an unheated/un-airconditioned garage all year round with cold winters and hot muggy summers? If so, what do you do about protecting it from rust?
      thats a challenge. its the swings in temp from day to night that do a lot of the damage - moisture condenses out of the air and lands on the machine. As well of course the high humidity we get in the summer.

      I run dehumidifiers and am currently dumping a full tank every 8-10 hours. I have one in the garage and one in the basement and its pulling tons of water out, even with the AC been on for the season.

      You can put a sheet of plastic over the machines. Then its only going to get the condensate from the temp swings for a small bit air instead of the column to the ceiling (ever wonder why stuff in a drawer doesn't rust as easily)

      Finally, consider insulating and heating it. Yeah its some dough, but life is too short not to enjoy the shop time you get. Keeping it at a constant temp is the biggest thing imo to avoid rust, and (with AC) its too hot to do that, run the dehumidifier.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #63
        As for the unheated etc space.....

        I have tools in a couple of rollarounds and a drill press in an unheated separate garage/shed with high summer humidity, and fairly large temperature swings in a day. Those items do OK if kept about as oily etc as they get in normal use.

        The only items that get rusty are untreated steel stock.

        The shed is not only unheated etc, it is also not in any way sealed up. The walls are single thickness "dutch" siding. Think "old time machinery shed".

        I would NOT suggest plastic sheeting, that seems to trap moisture. Canvas or the like may be better, as it can breathe, but still blocks easy air circulation. Plastic can be OK if used very loosely to block dew.

        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #64
          Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
          . Virginia is hot and humid in the summer and cold in the winter so after using it in the garage, .
          Where abouts in VA? I'm in Central VA near Charlottesville.
          Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
          Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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          • #65
            Near Herndon.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by RB211 View Post

              Nope, no one else replicates what Sieg makes. Even the Chinese have standards
              Seem to have a decent name and a decent seller in the UK and Europe.... just sayin'...

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              • #67
                Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

                Seem to have a decent name and a decent seller in the UK and Europe.... just sayin'...
                And Sir John made part of his living designing mods for them. There are importers with "relationships" with Sieg, no doubt. For a desktop mill, the "BV" series that many sell like Grizzly and PM are superior designs to the Sieg X3 series. Sieg X3 is a wet noodle.
                Just take a look at Brian Rupnow and what he gets done on his Busy Bee "BV" mill.

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                • #68
                  I don't have anything to compare as I have an old 1941 Nichols hand mill. To this I've made additions to somewhat modernise it such as an x axis lead screw, power feed and a vertical head. It's still an old worn out turd and I'm not proud of it.

                  Many will buy these imports simply due to workspace size precluding buying something with a big footprint of the Bridgeport sized machines. Here's a comparo between two similar sized machines. Based on this if in the market I'd likely go with the PM.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_eYE9fFXDdM
                  Last edited by I make chips; 08-04-2020, 12:49 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post

                    I fail to understand why you waste your free time on a forum devoted mainly to HOME SHOP MACHINING.
                    I enjoy reading and seeing other posters Monarch's, Bridgeports, Southbend model 9A's, Atlas 7" and Elliot 14" shapers, etc etc, and what they get up to with them.
                    I have zero interest in a CNC $1 million dollar machining box at your place of work making parts i cannot quantify unless you've explained what they actually are.
                    And telling me speeds and feeds and DOC and super duper toolbits (not purchased out of your own wallet) on exotic materials that have ZERO relevance to me and my machines in my shed.
                    Sorry, horses for courses.
                    I like your style, keep it going.
                    To answer your questions.

                    Global Viral Pandemic, I am bored to tears.
                    Does not one single person in the US have a non "in your words" Hobby Machine at home?
                    Is it entirely unlikely that someone may learn something from my ramblings? I know nothing about professional sports, cooking, beer making, knitting, classic literature, history, animal husbandry, botany, zoology, geology, living celebrities, dead celebrities, politics, ethics, music, poetry, cars, motorcycles, bicycles, commercial fishing, recreational fishing, pork, chicken, beef, or the futures markets for commodities, snakes, dung beetles and all other insects, autographed pictures of Randy Mantooth, surfboards, home appliances, tether ball, disgruntled postal workers, Cher, Bigfoot (not to be confused with one another), the plastic things on the ends of shoe laces, Kate Bush, Marmite, the US state of Idaho (does anyone actually live there?), aircraft, submarines, rolomites, the mark of Zoro, bricks, random people on the street, recycling, whale watching or barbershop quartets.

                    However I know a good deal about machining so stick to that subject.

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                    • #70
                      Wouldn't it be nice to be able to plug in a power converter into your 120 Volt electrical receptacle and convert it to 220 Volt, single phase, 20 amp? I could then get a knee mill. I can dream can't I???

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
                        Wouldn't it be nice to be able to plug in a power converter into your 120 Volt electrical receptacle and convert it to 220 Volt, single phase, 20 amp? I could then get a knee mill. I can dream can't I???
                        Surely it's not that hard to get a 220v outlet in your garage. The other leg can't be that far away.
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
                          Wouldn't it be nice to be able to plug in a power converter into your 120 Volt electrical receptacle and convert it to 220 Volt, single phase, 20 amp? I could then get a knee mill. I can dream can't I???
                          Power converter A.K.A. a step-up transformer, but that comes with a cost beyond monetary. Double the voltage, but only half the current of the circuit is available on the 220Vac side of the transformer.
                          Wouldn't it be easier to run a dedicated 220Vac 20A or 30A circuit out to the garage? Open a world of possibilities.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
                            . I can dream can't I???
                            paradise is a length of BX and a hammer drill away.....
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by danlb View Post
                              Hey Folks! Good morning. Just thought I'd throw in a positive note here.

                              So let's be nice and we all win.
                              Did you just say Kumbaya? Hahaa. I would have to agree with you. JR

                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                                I don't have anything to compare as I have an old 1941 Nichols hand mill. To this I've made additions to somewhat modernise it such as an x axis lead screw, power feed and a vertical head. It's still an old worn out turd and I'm not proud of it.

                                Many will buy these imports simply due to workspace size precluding buying something with a big footprint of the Bridgeport sized machines.

                                .......
                                Based on comments here, I think most people who buy small mills from china are folks who have no machine tool market in their area, or are folks who are afraid that an old machine will just mean a LOT of work and expense before it can do any work. And they do not want that.

                                So they buy a PM, or a Sieg, or the silk-screened brand name of choice, and assume that it is perfect, because after all it is "Factory new". And, they seem to do work on them whether the nameplate says "Sieg" or "Jet", "Harbor freight", etc..
                                1601

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan

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