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  • lovemesomemachines
    replied
    Thanks to everyone who responded to my question. I appreciate you taking the time out of your busy schedules. Now off to post my next question.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    LMSM, that's a brain teaser for sure. You might need to think about a very scaled down version of what Doozer used but in your case perhaps a dual drum cable winch that lifts both sides at the same time from one crank. I'm not sure how Doozer did it in his case since trying to pull up one side then the other would result in things wracking and locking ever few inches. So I'm guessing at a coordinated lift on both sides. Doozer? And that is what you'd get with a dual drum cable winch setup and a few pulleys. You might also need an able body assistant to place the far post pin since you'd be on one side doing the cranking and pinning on that side.

    Once to height you pin the tubes with big diameter pins/bolts that won't just shear off. For lifting a big knee mill like a B'Port I'm guessing you'd want a couple of 3/4" pins at least. Maybe even 1" just to be sure. At least if they are just regular mild steel or cheap bolts.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Most places I've worked had travelling overhead cranes, very handy. But when it came to moving machinery, the tended to favor either the forklift (for production machines), or using toe jacks with machinery skates (for mills and lathes).

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Ditto from me on the "ooooo... nifty" comment. Bloody brilliant in fact.

    It's also quite the platform you have on that trailer! It took me some serious looking to see that it wasn't a carport roof ! ! ! !

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  • lovemesomemachines
    replied
    BCRider...that's exactly what I was thinking. Build the gantry so the sides and top fit through your garage door and as soon as you get it inside the garage, you can adjust the height as you like. For me, I'm not an engineer by any stretch of the imagination, it comes down to how do I control the height once inside the garage? What kind of mechanism can a single person use to adjust the height? I'm thinking long term as my first machine may not be real heavy but when I decide to move to a single family home and buy a knee mill, the gantry is going to have to support that weight, height adjustable and all. I've got the sides and top designed out in my head but the height adjustment just isn't there.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    ooooo nifty!

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    Doozer, that's a sweet gantry you made up. But one question... how in H-E-double hockeysticks did you lift up the tall tubes with the beam on top? Perspiring minds need to know!
    The beam sets on the bases, then you insert the column tubes, then use boat trailer winches to crank it to the top, insert pins.

    -D
    Attached Files

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

    they take up space but they're not underneath the lift. Engine hoist are great for, well, engines
    Or do like I did when I planned my new shop to be engine hoist feet friendly and made all the stuff engine hoist friendly with space underneath or gaps to fit into the "V" of the legs and let me place the item.

    I'm still thinking that as long as the lifting solution fits under the garage door to allow moving from outside to inside that there's no wrong answer here.

    In my case I had the engine hoist already so when I drew up my shop's floor plan and made my decisions on bench and stand design it was all based around using the engine hoist so I allowed some space below the benches or stands which I new might need to be hoist friendly.

    If I'd already had or made a lift gantry then things would have been done a little differently so they suited the gantry.

    Speaking of garage doors I think there's a good message on gantry size and capability to be seen in Doozer's pictures. If the gantry is to be a "on gantry for all jobs" it will have to be an adjustable height rig. A gantry which fits under a garage door will be too short to lift a lot of things out of a truck bed. The knee mill I got a few years back being a good example of this. The top of the boom by the time I'd lifted up the mill to let me drive the truck out from under was a good amount taller than the door opening. And it's not a large mill either. So a gantry would similarly need to have adjustable leg units for height to do the same sort of job. Then once the truck or trailer is gone and the machine lowered the beam can be adjusted back down to the through door height. Or if that's not tall enough dropped down, moved and and the machine pushed through using good old Egyptian pyramid rollers on leveled tracks to scooch the machine through the doorway. Then the gantry can again lift it and move it into position.

    Or the gantry could be given some 2x pieces between the legs so the equipment rests on the "bridge" to roll in under the door. That's how I prefer to roll the heavy items around so the boom isn't being twisted while under heavy load..

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    And the end frames on a gantry would NOT be ! ? ! ? ! ? ! ?
    )
    they take up space but they're not underneath the lift. Engine hoist are great for, well, engines
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-08-2020, 06:11 AM.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    It was actually kinda fun doing millwrighting stuff at the elevators.
    Is downtown Buffalo too long a commute? Just come down the 190.

    -D
    Yeah the flour has been hiring and so has the US Sugar on Bailey and Clinton. My old job was at the Dresser plant (buffalo Tungsten) (millwright) But I'm coming from NF. For the kind of money the flour plant pays it would be worth the drive. Ditto for the sugar. Problem: I have had long-term disabilities. Other problem: never been in a trade union. Pluses: 3 trade certs including machining at Erie County CC at own time and expense. A lifetime of hands-on. Mostly millwright/fab. Trying to go into machining for the last decade, no joy. Most offers are between 15 and 20 an hr for me. Cheap bastards. I'm actually investigating a dairy farm instead. Get paid to play with tits, milking 500 head.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Gantry crane is much nicer than an engine hoist because the engine hoists legs are ALWAYS in the way.
    And the end frames on a gantry would NOT be ! ? ! ? ! ? ! ?

    I'm thinking that the right choice for any given shop would be the one that was chosen before the layout process for stands, benches and other accoutrements occurred. Whichever option the shop is designed to accommodate will be the one that works. There is no "right" or "wrong" here. Just working with the choice that is made.

    Doozer, that's a sweet gantry you made up. But one question... how in H-E-double hockeysticks did you lift up the tall tubes with the beam on top? Perspiring minds need to know!

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    It was actually kinda fun doing millwrighting stuff at the elevators.
    Is downtown Buffalo too long a commute? Just come down the 190.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I have 2 identical 2 ton Cyclone chain falls.
    They came from the grain elevators.
    They were bound up, packed with flour,
    so they pitched them. Easy to clean them out.
    I need another 2 ton beam trolley so I can put both
    up on the beam.

    -D
    Chainfalls are on my short list of "wants" and they have been there for years. Maybe this year, depending what happens regarding work. Being disabled out of my old job was a blessing since my blood pressure came down from the danger zone. Trying to find anything in Niagara Falls is gonna be fun. Hoping and praying to get into the St Gobain (Carborundum) plant.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    I have 2 identical 2 ton Cyclone chain falls.
    They came from the grain elevators.
    They were bound up, packed with flour,
    so they pitched them. Easy to clean them out.
    I need another 2 ton beam trolley so I can put both
    up on the beam.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Just build a gantry to suit your needs.
    I built this one in a week with steel I had behind my shop.
    The columns are 4.5" pipe, that had washed up on the shore of lake Erie.
    Electrical rigid conduit I think, as it was straight threaded and galvanized.
    It spans 10' and has 13' under the beam.
    One man can set it up.

    -Doozer
    Is that a CM Cyclone chainfall I see up there? Good man! Those are among the best, and absolutely an ass-saver on the job for me. I'm stuck using come-alongs for now being lo-budget, but looking for work again. Its been 18 months since the first surgery and money is finally running dry....

    Leave a comment:

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