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Loctite alternative for a pressed on ring?

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  • Loctite alternative for a pressed on ring?

    I am making some modifications to some cast iron axle hubs and will be pressing on about 5" diameter steel rings with an interference fit.
    I want to insure they don't come off, and prevent rust between the two parts by using an adhesive product.
    I am looking for a product recommendation, I prefer alternates to Loctite brand since they seem rather expensive and any left overs would join my collection of dried out, out of date containers of such things.

  • #2
    Vibra-tite, permatex, 3M, CRC. Dunno what you have locally available.
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      IF you make an interference fit then Loctite or other equivalents will not help. If you really want both an interference and a locitte for security then you could machine half width to interference fit and half width to a slip fit as recommended by the adhesive makers. Regards David Powell.

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      • #4
        locktite recommends e.g. 608 for interference fits. i had the smallest bottle of thread locker for 25 years and it never dried out.

        edit: changed 608 to 680 (sorry).
        Last edited by dian; 08-09-2020, 01:18 AM.

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        • #5
          Loctite 608 is a 2 part epoxy, Doesn't seem suitable, did you mean 648?
          Loctite 648 is recommended for parts with clearance or interference fits.
          And all those products have recommend use by date,,, dunno if the product really deteriorate or if they just want you to toss it and buy more.

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          • #6
            Loctite anaerobic adhesives do not cure by solvent evaporation. I have some 20+ years old and still work perfectly well. 638 is new extra strong for press fits.

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            • #7
              He already said that he chooses not to afford Loctite.
              My cheaper suggestion would be to use pancake batter.

              -Doozer
              DZER

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              • #8
                How about using a shrink fit and nothing else? Shrink fits can get marginally higher strengths than press fits IIRC from reading machinery's handbook. BTW that's how the railroad originally installs tires on the train wheels -- with a shrink fit.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                  He already said that he chooses not to afford Loctite.
                  My cheaper suggestion would be to use pancake batter.

                  -Doozer
                  Actually, I said prefer.

                  But since no one seems to be able to answer it as framed we might as well move on to pancake batter.
                  Do you have any good recipes?
                  Something with a squirt of out of date Locitite in it?

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                  • #10
                    The shrink fit will hold past the day of resurrection. I've used shrink fits and the only way you get that second part off the first is by cutting. No need for any help.

                    Don't polish the surfaces, leave a bit of tooth on them.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      I have a great recipe for pancake batter but I would not waste a single drop of it in the shop.

                      🥣
                      Aunt Jemima Complete
                      Torani Vanilla Syrup (I use sugar free)

                      Add Torani Syrup to Aunt Jemima mix until you first have a thick liquid that's still too thick to pour. Stir to get the lumps out. Add water until it forms a concave crater when poured back from the spoon. Use a cast iron (machining content?) skillet heated till drops of water dance on it. You may have to decrease the heat a bit after/during the first batch.

                      Serve with butter and your favorite pancake syrup (I highly recommend Steen's Pure Cane Syrup) or a fruit topping.
                      🥣

                      After the first bite, I guarantee you will not take any of it to the shop. 😋 😋 😋 😍

                      I make a batch about once or twice a week. Unfortunately I can't have the cane syrup any more. 😥



                      Originally posted by cijuanni View Post

                      Actually, I said prefer.

                      But since no one seems to be able to answer it as framed we might as well move on to pancake batter.
                      Do you have any good recipes?
                      Something with a squirt of out of date Locitite in it?
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      Make it fit.
                      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        I make a batch about once or twice a week. Unfortunately I can't have the cane syrup any more. 😥
                        Try genuine, 100% Maple syrup some day... you'll never want anything else again. Loads of it up here by the Canadian border. I hear Vermont also has a bunch.

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                        • #13
                          Loctite is methacrylate.
                          Superglue is cyanoacrylate.
                          Superglue is cheaper, if that is your goal.
                          but you gotta be fast with assembly,
                          like 1 or 2 seconds, or........you know.
                          Break out the Vasoline !

                          --Doozer
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            Shrink fits are the ultimate answer for me. I use the stove and the fridge( With my wifes permission !!!!)Give one thous and one thou more for every inch of diameter interference when the parts are at the same temperature. Let the cold and the hot soak through the parts for long enough to get the cold and heat to go all the way through, then put them together in one smooth quick movement. I have built up cranks in model steam engines which have stood up to priming ( ie waterlogging practically stopping the engines instantly) without any breakage or movement.
                            Regards David Powell.

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                            • #15
                              Further to what David Powell is saying, its amazing what you can do with shrink fits. Most automotive flywheels are assembled that way -- The ring gear and the wheel itself are machined very closely. Then the ring gear is warmed up, but not enough to run the temper. Then the ring gear basically just drops right on. And you'll never get it off again without breaking the teeth. When you think about the forces that the ring gear deals with, its really amazing.

                              And so I would definitely consider a shrink fit. I've actually done a few on the kitchen stove -- easy to do when you cook with gas.

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