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  • Drill Stand

    Seeing that I'm planning ahead, I was searching around the interwebs looking for my first project to build, of course after I make my tool purchases, and happened across the attached drill stand (not sure what else to call it). The person who made the stand of course also sells the plans for the stand online but it's overseas and the sizes appear to be in mm. Would anyone happen to know if there is a plan for such a drill stand in any issues of The Home Shop Machinist or any other magazine by chance and maybe with a downfeed handle? Any suggestions would be most helpful. Thank you.
    Last edited by lovemesomemachines; 08-12-2020, 06:15 PM.

  • #2
    That is a really neat idea. It looks very precise.

    But most likely it's not. Let me splain it.

    The linear bearings are a nice touch. The dual rods give you a fairly good and stable sled for mounting the drill to the spindle. But the loss of precision comes from the use of a drill chuck. The average 3 jaw drill chuck works on one of a couple designs, and all of them have jaws that slide in and out as they contract on the shank of the drill. It's apparently very difficult to mill the mating parts in a production setting so that all of the jaws are in perfect alignment on 3 different axis. So they are either off center or the bit is canted just the tinniest amount. It's only a few thousandths of an inch, so it does not hurt much when drilling an average hole in wood or sheet metal with a hand held saw.

    I sort of recall the worst drill chuck that I owned was .008 TIR at 1 inch from the chuck. OK for wood, but that's about it.

    Having said that, it looks like a fun project if you just want to make sure that you have holes that are vertical or for tapping. Fun to build does not have to be perfect.

    Dan



    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      The assembly in the picture does not show a spindle drive, is this set up in a milling machine with the mill spindle driving it?

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      • #4
        It's similar to a magnetic drill press. I believe that's what the designer/builder of it had in mind. I was just wanting something like this to make vertical holes with a handheld drill instead of me just trying to eyeball it by hand.

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        • #5
          Bented...what's driving it is a handheld drill.

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          • #6
            So just how does that work? Do you use a hand held electric drill to turn that shaft? And is it a magnetic base?

            It seems to me that you would be better off with a bench top drill press. There are many that sell for under $99. I have had one for decades now and it is a workhorse in my shop. It is one of the most used machines that I have. Of course it depends on the type of work you do. Then there are larger drill presses that are also well worth their cost. I also have a 20", floor stand model but it cost a bit more. It is great for larger drilling jobs.

            As to building this device, I offer this:

            Inches = mm / 25.4

            That is an exact conversion. But I doubt that the dimensions of that "drill stand" need to be super precise. You can probably convert to the nearest round number size in inches and not worry about it. Just be sure you use the same numbers for mating parts.

            Note: That number, 25.4 (mm/inch) is the only one you need to remember and use to convert either way between inches and mm. 24.4mm IS the EXACT definition of the inch. That is by the international standards people so it works in every country of the world. It is exact: there are no more significant digits and even if you write it to a million decimal places, the rest are all zeros. It IS the definition of the inch, PERIOD. And it is easy to remember. The other conversion equation is:

            mm = 25.4 X inches

            To get inches you divide and to get mm you multiply.
            Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 08-12-2020, 08:08 PM.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
              Bented...what's driving it is a handheld drill.
              Now I understand. No puns intended.
              Last edited by Bented; 08-12-2020, 08:04 PM.

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              • #8
                Paul...yes, a handheld drill is turning the shaft.

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                • #9
                  Also, you can change your internet search phrase to "drill press" or "drill press plans". That should give you a lot of hits on the internet. You could add "DIY" (do it yourself).
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  Make it fit.
                  You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can design a "drill stand" for you, including full plans and detailed drawings, you will not like this however (-:

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                    • #11
                      Bented...I'm glad to read your sense of humor.

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                      • #12
                        More than you ever wanted to know on the subject of DIY drill guides...

                        https://www.homemadetools.net/catego...-drill-presses

                        A few examples...

                        https://www.homemadetools.net/forum/...256#post161410

                        https://www.homemadetools.net/forum/...223#post157884

                        https://www.homemadetools.net/forum/...544#post139416

                        and many, many more.
                        Regards, Marv

                        Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                        http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                        Location: LA, CA, USA

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                        • #13
                          Years ago I was working at a greenhouse and some dutch guys had a Metabo drill with a really slick attachment. It clamped to the collar behind the chuck and had a drill press like handle driving a square rack gear. The end of the rack had two flat plates that hooked behind what you were drilling and allowed the bit to pass between. Worked really well drilling through steel tubes. Never found a place to buy one and drew up plans in Cad and got the rack and gear, but never built.

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                          • #14
                            Did that Metabo accessory look like this ?
                            https://www.metabo.com/uk/en/accesso...600890000.html

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                            • #15
                              Marv...Thank you for the links.

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