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Cut off a carbide end mill shank

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  • #31
    Sure. Go to the store and buy a diamond disc.
    Or use the cut off wheels that you have and be done
    with the job.
    And you aren't going to wear out 3 or 5 cut off discs.
    Just used to nick the shank and then snap it off.
    Stop being hyperbolic. You must have been listening
    to too many political speeches.
    And still, Karate requires NO cut off discs.

    -Doozer
    DZER

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      Sure. Go to the store and buy a diamond disc.
      Or use the cut off wheels that you have and be done
      with the job.
      And you aren't going to wear out 3 or 5 cut off discs.
      Just used to nick the shank and then snap it off.
      Stop being hyperbolic. You must have been listening
      to too many political speeches.
      And still, Karate requires NO cut off discs.

      -Doozer
      Exactly.. who cares how many discs I use. I may got thru one , not get anywhere, and have to rethink it..
      but I might also get it done, and keep going ...instead of being HELD BACK by the CANT sayers..

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        Sure. Go to the store and buy a diamond disc.
        Or use the cut off wheels that you have and be done
        with the job.
        And you aren't going to wear out 3 or 5 cut off discs.
        Just used to nick the shank and then snap it off.
        Stop being hyperbolic. You must have been listening
        to too many political speeches.
        And still, Karate requires NO cut off discs.

        -Doozer
        I don't need to go to the store...I already own a stack of diamond discs because THEY WORK BETTER and I have done this **** for a living for decades, not for fun. Time is money and quality matters in this profession - even if doing it in the home shop. Anyone else can go to the store or not, that is completely up to them... as I already stated. I do not "nick" carbide and break it. Again, if you prefer to do so, go for it. If anyone is being hyperbolic it is yourself naysaying the way other people do things. I prefer my method but I'm not going to insult others for using theirs.

        People complain about the bickering at PM but it seems to be just as bad here. There it's directed at the hobbyists, here it seems more aimed in the other direction. Gets old either way.

        As far as talking about how things are done and etc. - yeah... It's a discussion forum... Sort of what goes on in those places.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Robert Dunn View Post
          I have a 1/4” carbide end mill that is much too long. I’ve seen YouTube videos of how to cut it off, but with expensive tools. Will a cheap diamond cut off disc work? Has anyone done this? Will a local machine shop do it?
          Thanks,
          Bob
          Back to the beginning.. which end do you want to cut ? Flute or shank? If you are using say an R 8 collet , you can often slide it up a long way inside..

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by eKretz View Post

            I don't need to go to the store...I already own a stack of diamond discs because THEY WORK BETTER and I have done this **** for a living for decades, not for fun. Time is money and quality matters in this profession - even if doing it in the home shop. Anyone else can go to the store or not, that is completely up to them... as I already stated. I do not "nick" carbide and break it. Again, if you prefer to do so, go for it. If anyone is being hyperbolic it is yourself naysaying the way other people do things. I prefer my method but I'm not going to insult others for using theirs.

            People complain about the bickering at PM but it seems to be just as bad here. There it's directed at the hobbyists, here it seems more aimed in the other direction. Gets old either way.

            As far as talking about how things are done and etc. - yeah... It's a discussion forum... Sort of what goes on in those places.
            Oh dude, I hear ya. I have a surface grinder with diamond cut off wheels, CBN cut off wheels, all kinds of cool stuff.
            But when posting here I try to remember not everyone has as many machines and tooling as I do.
            Yes, nicking and breaking it off is a hack thing to do. But it might get someone out of a jamb.
            But I am with you. Use a 7" diamond slicer wheel. But I was trying to help, and I know the audience.

            -Doozer

            DZER

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by eKretz View Post
              Riiight... More like wear out 3-5 zip discs. Pretty awful economy when you could alternatively just not wear out any diamond cutoff discs at all since they're made for cutting these materials... And let's waste some more time too... Hopefully this isn't a paying job. Some people just have to do things the hard way, no matter how many times they're told about the easy way.
              You know, I used to work for north america's largest carbide manufacturer (powdered raw material). The have a rod shop that does centerless grinding and cutoff. And THEY use resin-bonded discs in the cutoff machine (some big old cinci). Dunno what the abrasive was, but it wasn't diamond. The rod shop guy told me the difference was in the way the bonding agent could take high temps, plus flood coolant. (I was in there rebuilding his spindles)

              He'll get through it with one disc or less, it's only 1/4".

              Since this is "home shop" and not PM I try to assume that people don't always have the right tools -- instead, I try to assume the lowest common denominator. I would love to have diamond tooling myself, but it isn't gonna happen for some time, just for financial reasons. Planning to make my own laps, etc. It's definitely the way to go, but a zip disk will work in a pinch.

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              • #37
                Thank for all the great tips. I’ve contacted a local tool maker to see if they can do it (might be cheaper than buying a one use cut off disc). I’ll report back on the results.
                Bob

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                  It's not tungsten carbide, it's tungsten metal. Just don't try that when it's cold...
                  I think that brings up some confusion with folks that are either welders or machinists but not both.

                  I mess with both and agree with you. JR

                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

                    I think that brings up some confusion with folks that are either welders or machinists but not both.

                    I mess with both and agree with you. JR
                    Amen. I use both, and have cut both with zip disks. Like I said, I worked for the largest NA manufacturer of the material for a number of years. Had basically unlimited access to literally tons of both tungsten, and tungsten carbide.

                    Much like people who say "cast". I always ask them "Cast what? What is cast?" because casting refers to a process, not a material.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I tried cut-off discs, but they didn’t even touch it.
                      I sent it to a local shop that sharpens carbide woodworking saws, and they sliced a bit of the shank off clean as a whistle!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                        You know, I used to work for north america's largest carbide manufacturer (powdered raw material). The have a rod shop that does centerless grinding and cutoff. And THEY use resin-bonded discs in the cutoff machine (some big old cinci). Dunno what the abrasive was, but it wasn't diamond. The rod shop guy told me the difference was in the way the bonding agent could take high temps, plus flood coolant. (I was in there rebuilding his spindles)

                        He'll get through it with one disc or less, it's only 1/4".

                        Since this is "home shop" and not PM I try to assume that people don't always have the right tools -- instead, I try to assume the lowest common denominator. I would love to have diamond tooling myself, but it isn't gonna happen for some time, just for financial reasons. Planning to make my own laps, etc. It's definitely the way to go, but a zip disk will work in a pinch.
                        I guarantee they were not using aluminum oxide cutoff discs. Their resin bond cutoffs are probably diamond if they are cutting tungsten carbide - it would be a complete waste of time to use anything else in a production environment. You can get diamond grit wheels in all sorts of bonds - from vitrified to rubber to resin to metal!

                        Interesting to see the update noting that he tried a plain cutoff wheel and it failed miserably... What a surprise.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          What sort of holder is so short that a little cutter won't just go in deeper?

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                          • #43
                            Part of the limitation is my router table (this is a woodworking project).

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                            • #44
                              That makes sense now. I would use a cheap diamond file to score around the break point. As already mentioned, a tube drilled 1/4" to put the cutter in up to the score and just hold the end in a vise and snap it off. Eye ptotection is a good idea and you must be prepared for ocasional breaks that do not follow the score mark. The end might not be pretty, but that hardly matters.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by eKretz View Post

                                I guarantee they were not using aluminum oxide cutoff discs. Their resin bond cutoffs are probably diamond if they are cutting tungsten carbide - it would be a complete waste of time to use anything else in a production environment. You can get diamond grit wheels in all sorts of bonds - from vitrified to rubber to resin to metal!

                                Interesting to see the update noting that he tried a plain cutoff wheel and it failed miserably... What a surprise.
                                Yeah, the cutoff wheels they had were about 5" dia. with a 1-1/4 spindle hole, and cost $30 ea.

                                I'm surprised he failed with a plain cutoff wheel, I have actually cutoff 3/8 end mills with harbor freight discs. Takes about 3 of them to do the job..... very very slowly. The whole secret is do not melt the resin bond. It takes time to let everything cool off, then go at it again.

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