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Need to flatten thinwall pipe ends for structural use. Ideas on methods?

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    When in South Africa in the late 70'ies, I remember that the metal electric conduits of 20 and 25mm had threaded fittings. There were bends and Tees. The Tees had a little cover that helped the routing of the wires in the pretended direction. You could use a tool to put a radius on the pipe or use some wide radius curved accessory with threaded connections. We also used the pipe for all sorts of projects other than electrical.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post



    Ain't using shop equipment just, like, real easy and stuff? The machines do all the work, you know....
    Very nice squish. Looks like the ends of some anti-sway bars I have used. No stress risers and sealed up tight to boot.

    Thanks for sharing. JR

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  • JoeCB
    replied
    Very nice and your set-up looks to produce consistent shape and size ... good job


    Joe B

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  • C_M_H
    replied
    That die is looking good. A little time with a die grinder to radius the edges and done!

    I've been successful so far using aluminum for the dies and compressing them with my cheap 20 ton H-frame hydraulic press.

    Here's a setup I made to compress the end of 3/4" EMT to form a slip fit joint. It works very well.

    The compression dies are made from scrap, thus the extra holes;

    Click image for larger version

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    This die creates the "dimple". The generous radius keeps the EMT in good shape.
    The steel angles are welded to a collar that slips over the ram on my press. The screws
    allow different forms to be held;

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    Example of the dimpler arrangement. First I dimple the EMT, then compress it
    with the aluminum dies;

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    The finished joint. A screw or two provides a very secure joint;

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    Attached Files

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  • Mike Amick
    replied
    No, I take your point Jerry, definitely wouldn't have an electrical use. But it would
    be something that you could take a bunch of conduit and make a little table or book stand, whatever.

    People do it all the time with PVC .. just saying it might be cool if you could do it with conduit.

    I have actually made couplers AND T's welding up lathed to size steel rod. But I wouldn't want to
    have to make a bunch of them.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Not really likely to see a T, that is not a thing that would ever be used electrically. and as someone else pointed out (perhaps a tad "abruptly"), EMT has a limited structural capability, so it may not be seen as a type of tubing that needs such connectors. I could easily be wrong, but have personally never seen any structural system using EMT.

    That said, I see far thinner tubing used in products, case in point being a folding patio cover we have, which was bent a bit by a strong windstorm recently. If the structural elements had been EMT, the structure would likely not have been damaged. EMT is around 0.045" wall, and the "structural" elements of the cover may have been 0.020" or so wall thickness.

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  • Mike Amick
    replied
    Pretty sure J's question has been answered so I hope no one minds if I redirect just a hair.

    It would be cool if someone made couplers/connectors for conduit, like a T or elbow etc. would make a cool
    erector set. And yea, I'm fishing for someone to say ... yea, right here !!

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I'm trying to decide on just how to ease them.... rounding, tapering, etc. It seems that they should make it as easy as possible for the metal to go where it is wanted.

    Drawing dies get rounded, but this is not the same, the metal is getting pushed and will swell outward a bit, where for a drawing die, the metal is being pulled and will naturally pull around a smoothly rounded edge if the radius is right, and lubed up well..

    I need to look some more at the test piece and decide where to take out the material so as to allow the flattening as well as the forming of the flat in the right place and oriented correctly..

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Wow, looks nice! Agreed on easing the edges. I had a somewhat similar task at work just using flat dies in a hydraulic ironworker (fabricating handrails for OSHA)

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Well, got some time and dug out a horizontal cutter that I thought would do the job on the die. I need to look closely at the part and the die to figure put how much clearance for material I need on the flattening, depth wise and material spreading wise.

    The tool so far, not even cut off the stock yet (actually, the pic is before bringing the cut all the way to where I wanted it where the first pass stopped). Gave the Lewis a good workout to hog this 0.75 wide x 0.75 deep groove in the die......



    The result so far in terms of squeezing the EMT with the die in essentially as-pictured condition. I think it would have worked better, except that the sharp edges were catching and holding the EMT, not letting it slide down. Easing them should help, back to where the deformation of the EMT starts.

    Actually, although I thought it might be better looking, it isn't that bad for a first test of a die cavity that I am not done with.

    That EMT is pretty strong, and takes either a BFH, or some serious tonnage, the one ton arbor press was not up to it. I need to ease the edges, and cut clearance for the flattened part once I figure out how much at what place.








    Originally posted by pb57 View Post
    Why ask if all you want to do is pick apart answers you get. If it was me I would use the 50 ton press I made and if I didn't have that I would use the hammer and bench and it would still look good. Have you ever done simple projects like this before?
    Ain't using shop equipment just, like, real easy and stuff? The machines do all the work, you know.... Why you making it sound so difficult? All the youtube folks do things like snapping their fingers........ What could go wrong?
    Last edited by J Tiers; 08-24-2020, 03:34 PM.

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  • psomero
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
    I like the operator's metatarsal protecting sandals


    I hadn't even gotten to the second guy operating the foot switches, barefoot yet.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
    I used that rationale to justify buying an engine hoist to load and unload that little SB 9" I bought. Because it was a floormount model, I'm guessing 800 to a 1000 lbs from the way it set the trailer down.
    I'm betting your cabinet model is around 850 give or take a bit. My horizontal drive model was right on at 625. I unloaded it from the truck and got it in the house with a 2-wheel dolly from HF, the blue heavy-duty one.. Planned each movement ahead and did everything on the count of three, by myself. Got it all setup on the bench etc. A chain hoist is on my "dreams come true" list. Also a place to hang it.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post

    Did you notice about 1 minute in, lower left, you can see a worker with sandals on, exposed toes.

    That's a pretty hokey operation. With a simple die they could assure the flat is on one side and could eliminate the straightening operation.
    Doesn't require a die, possibly just a flame cut and grinder finished piece of plate. A little straightening as a second op.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    Did you notice about 1 minute in, lower left, you can see a worker with sandals on, exposed toes.
    Hahaaa. I had to look around and make sure no one was you tubing me I wear thongs (feet not butt) in my home shop. Welded thousands of lines of metal and turned just as much and still cant wear proper foot gear. Thats on me and my shop. Never any foot injuries. Always the hands. Oh, I always wear eye protection.

    And, I dont allow anyone in my shop. I dont tell my Wife what to do though... JR

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    I'm done with you. All you like to do is argue with your ignorance.
    Thats F-in rude as all get out. We dont usually respond with lame azzed insults as calling some one Ignorant. I think you own an apology.

    This site is NOT like other sites. You dont like what you hear you are smart enough to not respond with insults.
    JMO.

    I dont run this Gin Joint.. JR

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