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A Great Way To Square Stock In The Mill by Joe Pieczynski

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  • A Great Way To Square Stock In The Mill by Joe Pieczynski

    I came across this video while YouTubeing around. It is a great technique, well worth the viewing time.

    At least I think so.


    I have shared hundreds of insider tips to help make your work easier and better, but this one is pure gold. The entire video incrementally discloses the full...
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

  • #2
    Saw that too. You wonder why you didn't think of it.

    Comment


    • #3
      All well and just great IF the raw matl. is good enough on the two first sides to hold it that way. Often the "chunk" of matl. I find doesn't have any two sides (let alone opposite sides) straight or parallel to hold in a vise. :-) So the old way of getting one side FLAT then that side against the fixed jaw to get one more flat and at 90 deg. etc, etc, is the only option. UN-fortunately :-)
      ...lew....

      Comment


      • #4
        His video's are well worth viewing, even for experianced HSM's.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think most of us cut off bar stock of some sort so the method shown would be valid. For those times where the lump looks like a misbegotten lump of fallen meteorite a couple of extra steps would be needed to get started. But those extra steps would be needed in any event.

          And yes, I'd say that the technique qualifies as a forehead slapper for a lot of us...
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            I thought that was more or less the standard way of truing a block when it's close to start with. That's how I've been doing it for years with the exception of climb milling. Even if I'm just dusting, I hesitate to climb mill when I have tall parallels in the vise.

            But I agree with other posts - if you're dealing with a really oddball shaped piece (as is often the case in home shops where we like to save every little bit of scrap material), you may need some additional prep.

            It's also worth pointing out that you can shave even more time off the procedure shown depending on the size of the block. Right around the 8 minute mark when he is putting the block back on the vise with the short parallel, you can hang the part out the side of the vise and get two sides with one setup: deck the top, drop the endmill and buzz the side. This - obviously - only works for small blocks where the cut length of the endmill is sufficiently long to cover the entire side of the block.

            Comment


            • #7
              skipped through the video, worth a look but I was disappointed to see that there was no validation of the technique at the end. Not even a quick check with a machinists square or measuring the different dimensions.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                skipped through the video, worth a look but I was disappointed to see that there was no validation of the technique at the end. Not even a quick check with a machinists square or measuring the different dimensions.
                Even then, the dimensions could be within a thou and your still holding a parallelogram in your hand.

                Comment


                • #9
                  hence machinists square?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    hence machinists square?
                    Off course.
                    My post was just a comment on a possible result, the "or" portion of you post.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                      ...I was disappointed to see that there was no validation of the technique at the end.
                      Joe is a professional machinist. I doubt that he would use a technique that doesn't work. He could always fake the results if he was trying to fool people. He said that he would use the same method in a future video, so maybe he will take some measurements then. It's not like the other method is guaranteed to be without error every time.

                      I like his videos, but I don't understand why he uses the clickbait titles.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                        Even then, the dimensions could be within a thou and your still holding a parallelogram in your hand.
                        You won't have a parallelogram unless your mill X, Y and Z are a not at right angles. The perpendicularity of the first 5 sides all depend on the accuracy of your machine; the 6th comes off the others.

                        Mike

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've used that method and variations of it for years. Very quick to pop a block in some talon grips and hold by 0.06" and walk around it with the CNC. It's a pretty standard CNC machining technique. Not often done in manuals, as most prefer the face/flip (at least more manual guys I know, myself included).

                          Sometimes I only do 2 sides, or 3, etc....It all depends on the final shape of the block. I won't walk down a side that's getting cut away anyway, or will only go down so far. Why spend time machining a surface that will get cut away in the next op anyway.... Sometimes I chamfer all the corners at the same time too. Nice grabbing a block from the vise with no burrs on it.

                          Just another handy tool to have in your toolbox. Many different ways of skinning the cat (my apologies if that's offensive to any cats reading this).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Probably the equal to his procedure for newbies ( and which is common in many shops and I use it also) is the proper use
                            of force to make sure the block is on the parallels . I have used a leather mallet for 50 years to ensure contact with the parallels and vise base
                            Second choice is a lead hammer. "Dead Blows" can still bounce the parts so care is needed more so , and hammers are a no-no
                            Joe did mention this in the beginning.
                            On non square blocks, I find using a steel pin or dowel on the moving jaw a better way to minimizing movement on the first cut -it gives the solid jaw full contact
                            Rich
                            Green Bay, WI

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In case you didn't view all of the video or you missed it, he claims "no burrs" due to using climb milling on all cuts. He even cuts one last side at the end using climb on one edge and conventional milling on the other. The climb side showed no burrs and he states there are none. But the conventional side does show an obvious burr along most of that edge.

                              I have taken some screen shoots of the video and plan to make a collage from them, with some added notes and arrows. I will hang this by my mill to refer to until I can remember the full technique.



                              Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                              I've used that method and variations of it for years. Very quick to pop a block in some talon grips and hold by 0.06" and walk around it with the CNC. It's a pretty standard CNC machining technique. Not often done in manuals, as most prefer the face/flip (at least more manual guys I know, myself included).

                              Sometimes I only do 2 sides, or 3, etc....It all depends on the final shape of the block. I won't walk down a side that's getting cut away anyway, or will only go down so far. Why spend time machining a surface that will get cut away in the next op anyway.... Sometimes I chamfer all the corners at the same time too. Nice grabbing a block from the vise with no burrs on it.

                              Just another handy tool to have in your toolbox. Many different ways of skinning the cat (my apologies if that's offensive to any cats reading this).
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment

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