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OT- 120v-ac to 6v-dc Transformer

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  • OT- 120v-ac to 6v-dc Transformer

    I'm looking for something more in the "hard wired" world than the small plug in charger types used for devices. Something like this: https://www.mcmaster.com/ac-to-dc-vo...ower-supplies/

    It wouldn't need to fit a j-box, I can adapt for that. Unfortunately this goes to 12 volt, not 6. It would be in a non-conditioned space and subject to dust, but not a wet area.

    All I come up with are the things that look like a charger. The device uses a 6 volt lantern battery, and I want to do away with using those and have a steady power supply.

  • #2
    What are the current needs> Those batts can put out a significant current. JR

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    • #3
      How much power does the load draw? And how tolerant is it of variations in supply voltage? Within limits, those wall wart types might fit the bill. You have the option of taking one apart and wiring it into a box of some kind, where you can supply it line voltage through an ac cord instead of having to plug the module into a socket. Most of these things will output a higher than rated voltage until load is applied, then the voltage will drop under load.

      If you're powering a light, you can switch the ac input side, which will avoid the 'over-voltage' issue if the load suits the size of the adapter. If you're powering some electronics, a common way to deal with it is to start with a higher voltage than the load needs, then pass that voltage through a regulator ic. That takes care of a few issues that might otherwise be a negative to the proper functioning of the circuit.

      You can get around some of the negatives by using a power supply that is capable of much more output than your circuit requires- in which case the no-load output voltage would have to be closer to what your circuits wants. I'd say for a 6 volt output, you wouldn't want much more than 6.5 volts output under no load- then with load it may drop to near 6 volts. With enough filter capacitance you could then do away with the need for a regulator as part of it.

      What are you powering?
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4
        OK, you asked....https://adorstore.com/

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        • #5
          So, 1.3A motor ( https://adorstore.com/blogs/news/724...1-battery-life )

          A 1.5A power supply may do the trick just fine. Dunno about a 1.25A.....
          CNC machines only go through the motions.

          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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          • #6
            So a brute force power supply would be fine. That's a transformer, bridge rectifier, and filter cap. I'd be looking for something in about a 20 watt capacity, so roughly 3 amps at 6 volts. You're not likely to find that in any typical wall wart. The switching will most likely be done on the low voltage side, so you want something which can remain powered continuously without overheating. You might look for an electric fence power supply. Those are usually made to replace the 6v lantern battery.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              Just got a 12v 30A power supply on amazon for $30. 6v is weird but most have a trim pot to fine tune. Should not be hard.

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              • #8
                Here are some 6V 2A power supplies:

                https://www.banggood.com/AC-110-240V...r_warehouse=CN

                $6 plus $3 shipping.
                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by no704 View Post
                  Just got a 12v 30A power supply on amazon for $30. 6v is weird but most have a trim pot to fine tune. Should not be hard.
                  Show the trim Pot, it might be potted to keep folks from mess ing JR

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                    Here are some 6V 2A power supplies:

                    https://www.banggood.com/AC-110-240V...r_warehouse=CN

                    $6 plus $3 shipping.
                    Bingo. Gut it as well as you need and slip it on into the gidjet you have. Put a switch inbween? Yeah.. JR

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                    • #11
                      A lot of frame style or din mount power supplies have trimmer resistors but you get maybe 20% adjust at most. Get a easily available 5 volt supply and adjust the trimmer up and you should get to 6v.

                      Other than that you can use one of the cheap adjustable dc/dc converters on ebay or amazon and take your 12v and buck it down to 6v. https://www.ebay.com/itm/1x-10x-LM25...e/332711109230

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                      • #12
                        Yeah, I agree- I don't think you'll get down to 6 v with the adjustment in a 12 v power supply. One 12v, 30 amp power supply I have can be adjusted down to 11 volts, and up to just over 13 volts- that's the full range. If you started with a computer power supply you could probably get the 5v supply up to 6v, or near enough anyway for your application. Provided it has an adjustment that is-

                        There's lots of info available on how to get them to turn on independently of a computer, and what you may need to do to keep them stable- like having a minimum load on the appropriate output voltage. Other than that, you can just ignore all the voltages you don't need.

                        But of course if you're going to buy a power supply, you might as well get one that is ready to go at the right voltage. I would still go for one with a 3 amp or more capability- partly to ensure that it will not self-protect because of the motor starting current (which would make it useless) and partly to ensure that it will continue to handle the motor even after a few years of use when frictions will rise in the operating mechanisms.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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