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Building the Trevithick Engine

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  • If I need to do something like that, I’ll wrap it in aluminum foil. Quick and easily covers and conforms to odd shapes.

    Sid

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    • So, the Trevithick is completely finished. The painting was finished 3 days ago, and it was all reassembled this morning and posed for some "beauty shots". I had a few issues with this build which involved the cylinder and the 4 way valve, but in the end I used a more conventional slide valve and finished with a well running engine. Thanks for riding along with me, and saying 'Hi" once in a while. It is a very pretty engine, and now it will go up on my shelf to the place of honour along-side the Stephenson's Rocket.---Brian




      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • I like the colour combination. Another great job. Thanks for the ride.
        Larry - west coast of Canada

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        • Nice result Mr. Rupnow!

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          • Thanks guys.--A word of warning---I would not use that brand of paint again. As soon as it dried it started flaking off. I have never had that problem using Tremclad or Rustoleum paints, but the colors are somewhat limited. This paint is "Dupli-Color Perfect Match" sold in aerosol spray cans by Canadian Tire.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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            • Can we see it running in its pretty colors??
              Very nice build and I enjoyed following the thread.

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              • A number of years ago I built my wife a whirligig made from mainly brass and aluminum, both of which I find are hard to keep paint on, specially when it is out in the weather 24/ 7/ 365. I got some etching primer from Home depot which I think was the answer and used spray cans of paint for the finish coats. I am quit amazed that the paint in still completely intact although a bit faded by now. I can have a look at the cans in my shop and get the exact names if anyone is interested.
                Larry - west coast of Canada

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                • Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
                  A number of years ago I built my wife a whirligig made from mainly brass and aluminum, both of which I find are hard to keep paint on, specially when it is out in the weather 24/ 7/ 365. I got some etching primer from Home depot which I think was the answer and used spray cans of paint for the finish coats. I am quit amazed that the paint in still completely intact although a bit faded by now. I can have a look at the cans in my shop and get the exact names if anyone is interested.
                  Yup, aluminum requires a etching primer. Of course you can get lucky with some paints and they might stick, but the etching primer is the recommendation. The duplicolor is a automotive intended paint, probably a laquer and not as forgiving.

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                  • Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                    Can we see it running in its pretty colors??
                    Very nice build and I enjoyed following the thread.
                    Ringo--have a look at post #232 to see a video of the finished engine running. Since this engine has to be either blocked up so the wheels don't touch the ground, or held in a vice, it would screw up the finished paint job to run it now. I'm not kidding about the paint--it falls off if you look at it harshly.---Brian

                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • Brian. Looks good. Did you run after paint at all?
                      On aluminum, aside from the etching primer as recommended, I’ll often glass bead before the primer too.

                      Sid

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                      • No, I never ran it after paint at all. Right now it looks really good, and the teeth of all the gears are painted as well. It's beautiful (as long as you don't look to close). If I start it up and run it, then the paint is going to come off of those gear teeth. I know it runs, and as I was disassembling it for paint I seen that the main shaft with the flywheel on it was very, very stiff. I set it up on my garage table and ran it with a 1/2 hp. electric motor for an hour. That took any "stiffness" out of it, so I am sure it would run a lot slower now if I chose to run it. I don't have facilities here to glass bead anything. I have painted many aluminum parts with Tremclad or Rustoleum products before, and the only prep work was a wipe down with thinners to get rid of any oil and a blast of compressed air to blow any dirt off. None of the things painted with Tremclad or Rustoleum ever peeled or shredded. I won't be using Duplicolor paint in the future.
                        Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-15-2020, 07:37 PM.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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