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Machining Educational Recommendation

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  • #16
    Originally posted by lovemesomemachines View Post
    Since I'm just beginning my machining hobby, I began to look for training and all of the schools that I found are too far away from where I reside. That's a major bummer!!! Would anyone have any recommendations for video training? Sure I can look videos up on YouTube but I'm wondering if there may be a video instructional series that someone could recommend? Any suggestions would be helpful. Thank you.
    Lovemesomemachines: It would help if you told us a bit about yourself. Are you a young fellow in or just out of high school, or a retiree or somewhere in between? What part of the country do you live in? We're not nosy, just trying to help. Possibly you're near other forum members that may be in a position to help or advise. Good luck.
    Sarge41

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    • #17
      I forgot to mention in post #3 that the Army training site that I mentioned contains text based training courses. It was developed using tax dollars and the content is not restricted.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #18
        Not sure its still available but at one point gunsmith Darrell Holland had a set of videos for the lathe (South Bend 10 inch) and milling machine (Bridgeport) that taught basic machine operations. While older they were very well done. I also agree about getting a older textbook. Old ones can be very inexpensive and you don't need anything new if you are starting with manual machines. You also need an older Machinist Handbook.

        Edit: Any of these two volume sets would be good too...
        Machine Tool Operations, Burghardt
        Machine Shop Practice, Moltrecht (still in print)
        Machine Stop Training Course, Jones
        Last edited by Ohio Mike; 08-28-2020, 06:31 PM.
        Mike
        Central Ohio, USA

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        • #19
          structured course: https://www.youtube.com/user/Eksmast/videos

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          • #20
            IMO, machine shop text books (you can find these used for pretty cheap at places like Abebooks.com), forums, metalworking magazines, YouTube Videos, and - most importantly - hands-on experience are all necessary learning tools. No matter how much you read or watch, if you don't get out there and make some mistakes, you won't really master the subject. That comes with real, hands-on experience. I see the text and videos as a way to enable that hands on experience, not a substitute for it. So, be safe, but dive in with the understanding you'll probably break some expensive tooling and mess up a number of parts. That's okay! Just try to keep all your fingers

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            • #21
              YouTube. Tubalcain. Literally hundreds of videos specifically geared toward the novice/home machinist.

              Also old text books are cheap and plentiful. No amount of reading is too much.

              https://www.youtube.com/c/mrpete222

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              • #22
                My favorite book is "Technology of Machine Tools". I have the 1969 edition, which is really modern enough for most HSM purposes. Later editions can be over $100, but I found these:

                https://www.ebay.com/p/30787225?iid=383452498914

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                and

                https://www.ebay.com/itm/Technology-...UAAOSwrcle5zyB

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                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #23
                  I also spent a year at a CC course and found it very useful. Their text was the then current edition of Krar, "Technology of Machine Tools"
                  ~early 2000s edition. Whenever I am puzzled by something Krar usually has a discusssion and practical howto.
                  Another youtube channel with a high educational content: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpp...XO_FZYJppaFa5w

                  Looking on abebooks, several variants of Krar are there from $5 to 32.
                  FWIW I have the Moltrects but never found them very useful, YMMV.
                  Steve

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                  • #24
                    "General Industrial Machine Shop", Harold V. Johnson, 1979 edition. Available at used book sellers, and also viewable/"borrowable" here:

                    https://archive.org/details/generali...0john/mode/2up

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                    • #25
                      Another one to watch is Lyle Peterson a retired shop teacher. He has a series of vids you can buy access to that I imagine are good for the basics needed.
                      Check his utube website out to see if it passes your sniff test. https://www.youtube.com/c/mrpete222/featured

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                      • #26
                        just get making something, you'll soon figure it out. If you don't, come on here and ask questions. The more you do, the better your questions and the answers you get will be.

                        Theory and book/ video learning are all well and good, but this is an applied skill so you need to apply yourself

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