Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Luck Changed Today

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My Luck Changed Today

    My luck changed today, but not for the good.😩 After 19 years of using my 4X6 HV metal cutting bandsaw, I broke my FIRST blade. I have worn about one per year but never managed to break one. I was cutting some 1/4" aluminum flat bar and I noticed the blade was bumping a little. I shut down my cut and inspected the blade and found nothing, then it just snapped. I always keep a new blade as a spare, nothing like having to wait for a new one to come when your in the middle of a project.. I will order a spare blade tomorrow. That little saw is one of more used tools in my shop. I might even try to silver solder it back together.










    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

  • #2
    We had the same saw MSC branded at my new job. The stand was in such bad shape it had been repaired many times and fell over on my foot the other day. I asked to get a new saw and located a very nice used Doall C9 bandsaw for $750. Idiots went and bought ANOTHER Jet branded saw like the old one for $630! I wanted to cry. The work I am doing REALLY needs a bigger saw, now I will never get one.

    Comment


    • #3
      No way! Your luck didn't change, it just got quantified: One busted blade every 19 years.
      Southwest Utah

      Comment


      • #4
        If I had to count my damaged blades by luck, then it could only improve. I tend to be hard on blades. I do try to save them as best I can, but I cut all materials with it, including thin sheet stock- which tends to knock the teeth off. Right now I have a spot with probably 3 teeth missing, and I do what I can to time it so when that spot comes around I pull back on the feed. The blade still cuts well, so I'll cater to it until I've finished it off.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

        Comment


        • #5
          If the broken blade is not too dull, and you have a die filer, you may be doing OK...... Many die filers of the type with an overarm, can be used as saws, with a section of blade in place of the file. A busted bandsaw blade can supply a number of blades for that use.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            Interesting thought about a saw blade for a die filer. I've had a American Die Filer taking up valuable horizontal space on one my work benches for about 8 years, and only used it once. Just this past weekend I had a very rare visitor to my home shop, and I offered the filer up for adoption, the young fellow excepted the responsibility. We lugged it out to his car
            Now I have to find something put in it's place.
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

            Comment


            • #7
              Before you spend the time silver soldering that blade back together, use a magnifying glass to check for cracking in the tooth gullets. If one cracked and then broke you may have more of them ready to break.

              Comment


              • #8
                You must not use your bandsaw very much
                I have an 8" x 12" (going off memory here)
                horiz band saw, and if I treat it right, I might
                get 3 or 4 years use before it breaks. Once
                I TiG welded it back together, and looking
                closer, I saw it was full of cracks. Time to
                toss it in the bin.

                Note worthy of mentioning...
                Some bandsaws are made that give the blade
                a 1/4 twist and some give the blade 1/2 of a
                twist. Obviously the 1/4 twist models do not
                fatigue the blade as readily.

                -D
                Last edited by Doozer; 08-28-2020, 09:08 AM.
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                  Just this past weekend I had a very rare visitor to my home shop, and I offered the filer up for adoption...
                  By that action, you just violated your rule, "I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SLK001 View Post

                    By that action, you just violated your rule, "I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need."
                    But you have to remember that, I live on the Liberal Left coast where breaking the rules is the norm.
                    _____________________________________________

                    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                    Oregon Coast

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If I'm very careful with a blade, it will die from having multiple cracks in it- one will eventually let go. If I take a new blade (or an old one which is not cracked) and flex it, it appears to not quite make the radius that it needs to go around the wheels without stiffening up. To me that is a recipe for it to break, even if it's never been abused. It will simply be a matter of time before that happens. Obviously the tension plays a part, as does the play, or lack of, in the guide bearings. If a tiny cut-off piece gets drawn through the guide bearings, chances are a tight little bend will be hammered into the blade, which will then cause a tight spot every time it comes around, and will also cause the beginning of a crack at that point. I've seriously considered replacing the bottom guide rollers with guide blocks instead, or at least add a set of 'scrapers' just above the bottom rollers.

                      One thing that pisses me off is the cost of blades. For the 5 feet of blade on my saw, I'm paying 6 to 7 dollars a foot- I can buy a 1 ft long hacksaw blade for 2 or 3 dollars, and they have the extra fabrication step of punched holes and rounded ends on them. I've seen how quickly a weld can be made commercially on a band saw blade- surely that's not worth the extra$-
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My DoAll saw has a blade welder, so I buy 100 ft coils.

                        -D
                        DZER

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I remember reading somewhere or time that if you use a hone and round off the sharp corners of the back side of the blade, making it rounded, it relieves some of the stress when going around the wheels. Have any of you heard this and or tried it? I might have tried it way back in time but then spaced it off on the next blade, so I couldn't tell if it helped of not. So now I have to go out to the shop and hone the back side of my new blade?????
                          _____________________________________________

                          I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                          Oregon Coast

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have broken more blades than I care to remember...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              these make quite a bang when they go...

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	SawMill.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	1.98 MB
ID:	1895646

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X