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How to attach HSS to a piece of mild steel

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  • How to attach HSS to a piece of mild steel

    Hi Group,

    I need to remove the weld inside a 2" x 3' piece of steel pipe to use as a sleeve. I've looked at a couple of YouTube's but they are about square tube. What I'm thinking of is to weld a piece of HSS to a slug that I can pull through the pipe and cut the weld.
    So the question is how would you attach the HSS to the slug to draw it through the pipe? will welding hold it?

    TX
    Mr fixit
    Chris

  • #2
    I welded many a piece of HSS to mild steel to use as boring bars or flycutters. With a buzzbox Lincoln..

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    • #3
      Silver solder
      Ed
      Agua Dulce, So.California
      1950 F1 street rod
      1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
      1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
      1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
      1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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      • #4
        Second for silver solder

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        • #5
          I don't see why you couldn't braze it.

          But what would the heat do to the HSS ?

          JL....

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          • #6
            A weld will hold, but brazing is much better, as it would allow you to reposition the HSS if needed.

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            • #7
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozSE7Wrdb1o&t=2105s

              The above is a different system, have you seen it? I would think you could figure a way to prevent the guide from rotating within the tube being de-seamed.

              lg
              no neat sig line
              near Salem OR

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                I don't see why you couldn't braze it.

                But what would the heat do to the HSS ?

                JL....
                It's not ideal for HSS but workable if you don't go crazy with the heat. Not something I'd want for highly stressed production tool but usually acceptable for less extreme use.
                T1 HSS

                Click image for larger version

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                After secondary hardening peak at around 1100F you are on losing side: both hardness and toughness decrease.
                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                • #9
                  It almost makes me wonder if a loctite product would work. Say Loctite 603. Mill a groove in your plug, loctite a piece of HSS into the groove.

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                  • #10
                    I removed a lot of the weld seam inside of square tubing. I just welded the HSS to a piece of steel and used a jacking screw to adjust the depth of cut. It worked for me in my limited use. I am curious as to how you will keep the cutter aligned with the weld seam in a round piece of tube?
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                    • #11
                      This guy used hard facing welding rod to make a cutting edge for round tubing.
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jr4Capx8XI
                      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                        I don't see why you couldn't braze it.

                        But what would the heat do to the HSS ?

                        JL....
                        The steel probably wouldnt care. Even a basic HSS like m2 doesnt even start to temper until you hit about 1050f, so as long as you use a lower temp alloy solder youll be fine.Could use a higher temp solder too, but youd run the risk of dropping the steel from 65hrc to 60hrc. Not much of a difference honestly

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post

                          The steel probably wouldnt care. Even a basic HSS like m2 doesnt even start to temper until you hit about 1050f, so as long as you use a lower temp alloy solder youll be fine.Could use a higher temp solder too, but youd run the risk of dropping the steel from 65hrc to 60hrc. Not much of a difference honestly
                          Brazing happens over 800F....what brazing fillers are there between that and 1050? Every bronze or silver braze I'm aware of needs a lot more temp than 1050 and if you're under 800 its soldering, i.e. silver bearing solder. Strength of that is a faction of SS.

                          You can control the heat somewhat with SS, put the heat into the parent material so its traveling toward the HSS. Placing small bits of solder at the joint, they will wick in at the right temp, with most of hss remaining below its tempering temp. If space permits, a wet rag scrunched up on the end of the hss acts as a heat sink, and as soon as the joint is solder start taking heat out of the thing with air and or wet rags on the base material. The heat sink can be very effective, I've silver solder carbon steel stuff this way without wrecking the temper.

                          Welding has the advantage of not putting a lot of heat into part. Its intensively hot at the weld but briefly. But its hard to finesse, i.e. get some attachment close to the cutting edge without heating the edge too much.
                          Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-30-2020, 12:38 PM.
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                            It's not ideal for HSS but workable if you don't go crazy with the heat. Not something I'd want for highly stressed production tool but usually acceptable for less extreme use.
                            T1 HSS

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	art57-pic6.jpg Views:	30 Size:	24.7 KB ID:	1895804

                            After secondary hardening peak at around 1100F you are on losing side: both hardness and toughness decrease.
                            I thought the melting point of silver solder is like 1700 degrees.

                            I would think you want to keep the temp. as low as possible to avoid and change in hardness to the HSS, that's why I thought brazing. Either braze or silver solder should be strong enough.

                            JL..............

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                            • #15
                              I have made many boring bars and slotting tools using Easy-Flo (silver brazing rod) attaching HSS to steel. You need an oxy-acetylene flame though, an LPG flame won't do it. You need to get it at least a dull red and sometimes it gets even hotter, but I have not had any problems with the HSS. HSS can get bright red hot when grinding it, not to mention plunging it into water to cool it (free hand grinding) and it still works good.

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