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OT: installing new furnace fuel oil tanks - warning many pictures

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  • OT: installing new furnace fuel oil tanks - warning many pictures

    A friend had the furnace fuel tanks at her place start to go bad and asked if I could help her replace them. She lost her husband several years ago and it is difficult to find anyone to come out to rural areas and do work. She worked very hard helping me do the job and is a terrific human being.

    Pumped fuel from old tanks to new tanks.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	1 pump from old tanks to new.jpg Views:	133 Size:	82.1 KB ID:	1896604

    Drilled holes for concrete sono tubes (brand name)
    Click image for larger version  Name:	3 drill holes for concrete sono tubes.jpg Views:	148 Size:	111.2 KB ID:	1896600
    Tubes in place
    Click image for larger version  Name:	4 sono tubes in place.jpg Views:	137 Size:	129.5 KB ID:	1896601
    Mix concrete ready to pour.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	5 mix concrete to pour.jpg Views:	135 Size:	100.5 KB ID:	1896602
    Install steel bearing plates.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	6 install steel bearing plates.jpg Views:	137 Size:	93.8 KB ID:	1896603
    Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-05-2020, 04:49 AM.

  • #2
    get welder ready

    Click image for larger version

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    Stick weld beam to plates with bent rod technique.
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    Saw beam to length.
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    Weld on tank leg location cups. I milled some holes in 2 inch pipe and cut the pipe at the center of the holes to allow for drainage at the bottom if the legs.
    Click image for larger version

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    Cut 1 1/4 inch black pipe for legs.
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    Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-02-2020, 04:59 PM.

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    • #3
      Legs installed. Two legs were cut longer than the others to give the tank fall to the outlet. The inspector approved the job so far.
      Click image for larger version  Name:	12 tank legs installed and inspected.jpg Views:	31 Size:	111.9 KB ID:	1896566
      Tank 2 installed. Tanks had about 200 gallons each in them.
      Click image for larger version  Name:	14 tank 2 installed.jpg Views:	25 Size:	96.8 KB ID:	1896567
      Installed whistles, vents, gauges, and fill caps.
      Click image for larger version  Name:	15 install whistles gauges and fill caps.jpg Views:	26 Size:	95.0 KB ID:	1896568

      I made a fitting so the fuel pickup would not be from the bottom of the tank. I machined the threads off a 3 inch long 3/8 NPT brass nipple and soldered it in a 1/2 inch NPT brass close nipple. The close nipple screws in the bottom tank bung. A ball valve screws on the other threads of the close nipple. This connection to the bung was done the way the owner wanted it and was not done on the top of the tank with a duplex bushing. That was why I made the fitting so it would stick up in the bottom of the tank a few inches so as not to pick up dirt or condensation.
      Click image for larger version  Name:	drain close nipple.jpg Views:	27 Size:	91.2 KB ID:	1896569
      Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-02-2020, 06:59 PM.

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      • #4
        Ok, will one of you computer savvy guy tell me why I can't see Ridgerunner's photos????????
        _____________________________________________

        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
        Oregon Coast

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        • #5
          Didn't see anything at all when he first posted. Now I see 5 photos in his post #2 only.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tom_d View Post
            Didn't see anything at all when he first posted. Now I see 5 photos in his post #2 only.
            Crazy, now I see 9 photos in his #2 post ?????????Oh well ,
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

            Comment


            • #7
              I see no photos from #1 post and all photos in following posts ...

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              • #8
                Yep, no photos in post #1.

                Very nice installation, first class job all the way! Thanks for taking the time to take and post the photos.
                A lot of those tanks used to be installed in the basement. Lots of fun when they start to leak down there.

                Just wondering why she decided to go with two tanks instead of just one bigger one.This would have reduced the redundancy level a bit, eased the install work, as well as leaving a smaller overall footprint.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #9
                  Wow nice job! I grew up with a single 250-gallon in the basement. Supplemented with the wood stove on the really cold times (Jan-Feb, usually)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks everyone.

                    I tried to fix the photo issue. The forum let me put 6 photos in the first post and I think that messed things up?? I eliminated one so now I hope the pictures work.

                    Originally posted by Willy View Post
                    Yep, no photos in post #1.

                    Very nice installation, first class job all the way! Thanks for taking the time to take and post the photos.
                    A lot of those tanks used to be installed in the basement. Lots of fun when they start to leak down there.

                    Just wondering why she decided to go with two tanks instead of just one bigger one.This would have reduced the redundancy level a bit, eased the install work, as well as leaving a smaller overall footprint.
                    The original tanks were installed by her husband 40 years ago and he has since died. Basically, she does not want to change anything he did.
                    Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-02-2020, 07:30 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Willy View Post
                      ...
                      A lot of those tanks used to be installed in the basement. Lots of fun when they start to leak down there.
                      ...
                      Indeed! And howbout when buried tanks leak? Don't even know it until it's a full blown disaster. Have to get in HAZMAT guys in space suits to deal with it. $$$

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post

                        A lot of those tanks used to be installed in the basement. Lots of fun when they start to leak down there.
                        My son's basement tank went about 10 days ago; appears that a seam started to fail. The leaked amount was less than a gallon. The replacement will be a double-wall tank, meanwhile his oil is stored outside in several plastic drums temporarily plumbed down to the furnace.

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                        • #13
                          I posted this some years ago:

                          ================================================== =====

                          About 6 miles from where I live, copper thieves hit the home of my son's friend. Caused about 6 or 8 thousand dollars of damage to electrical and plumbing systems.


                          They also ripped out the copper feed line from the oil tank to the burner.


                          They did not shut off the tank valve.



                          A contractor had to drive steel pilings around the perimeter of the house to support it during excavation of the oil-contaminated soil underneath - I don't know to what depth.


                          The bill for this was in the 60 to 80 thousand dollar range.



                          The thieves (who, surprisingly, were caught) received 2 or 3 hundred dollars for the ripped-off copper. I do not know the legal disposition of the case.



                          Repairs were all covered by home-owner's insurance - but I wonder how long before insurance underwriters implement exclusions for high-dollar copper-theft damage.



                          $300 return from $70K destruction ...

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                          • #14
                            Yes it can get real expensive once hazmat gets involved.
                            Lots of new or replacement installs of furnace oil tanks now require secondary spill containment measures as well as vehicular guarding in some jurisdictions. You don't want to even guess what an underground install will cost.

                            Looks like Ridgrrunner has his ducks all in a row having wisely gotten the inspectors approval he knows it's all up to code. Undoubtedly a lot better than most out there that have been leaning against the side of a trailer for 15 years with three 30 inch pipe legs sinking in the mud and the fourth propped up on a stack of scrap 2x4's and an old pine cone.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Where is this at? Around here all the elliptical oil tanks stand upright. These would laying on what we would consider the side of the tank. Not much oil heat around here anymore. Mostly rural or very old neighborhoods. Its hard to find guys who know how to work on them these days.
                              Mike
                              Central Ohio, USA

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