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OT: installing new furnace fuel oil tanks - warning many pictures

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
    Where is this at? Around here all the elliptical oil tanks stand upright. These would laying on what we would consider the side of the tank. . ...........
    Had the same thought.

    Makes the amount left below the sludge leg a lot larger percentage of the total contents
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
      Where is this at? Around here all the elliptical oil tanks stand upright. These would laying on what we would consider the side of the tank. Not much oil heat around here anymore. Mostly rural or very old neighborhoods. Its hard to find guys who know how to work on them these days.
      Ironically, I picked up the tanks at the manufacturer which was in Ohio. Installed in rural Pennsylvania.

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      • #18
        That is odd. Around here most I've seen come from Hamilton Tanks.
        Mike
        Central Ohio, USA

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        • #19
          Any way, I did not read any of the other posts, drivel most likely. Ridge Runner I am happy to know you. JR
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JRouche View Post
            Any way, I did not read any of the other posts, drivel most likely. Ridge Runner I am happy to know you. JR
            Thank you. I really appreciate the thought.
            Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-05-2020, 04:55 AM.

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            • #21
              So what WAS the reason for putting the tanks "on their sides"?

              Just 'cause that is how the old ones were?
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #22
                The tanks that Ridgerunner installed are obviously meant for a horizontal application rather than a vertical install as they do have fittings for the legs and plumbing installed in order to suit a horizontal install.
                He also mentioned previously that the lady he did the install for wanted the new tanks installed just like her late husband had done 40 years prior. She did not want to deviate too much from what he had done.

                I have seen literally thousands of these tanks in the past from not only having filled way too many of them but also having sold them for years.
                Granted 95+% of them are mounted vertically but the the tanks that are installed in the lay-down configuration do have their place. Mostly when the home owner does not want an unsightly external tank and either doesn't want one in the basement, or simple doesn't have a basement but does have a crawl space that he can tuck the tank into. When vertical space is at a premium this type of tank is the answer.

                However having said that that I can't remember having seen them installed this way. It's not wrong, it's just different, and it is a very professional install while meeting the wishes of the lady that paid to have the work done.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #23
                  That's fine, it was the combination of the horizontal and the sludge leg that got me thinking about how much is left in the tank when the level gets below the sludge leg. They also need to be pretty much level to get the most out before running dry at the pipe.

                  Never seen any like that, had oil heat where I grew up, tank like that, vertical, down in the basement at the bottom of the stairs. The old oil burner was replaced with a gas conversion, and then decades later, the cast iron natural circulation boiler was replaced by a little bitty gas sectional boiler.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_12342.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	65.7 KB
ID:	1897424 My son's new double-wall oil tank:

                    Last edited by tlfamm; 09-05-2020, 11:42 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      That's fine, it was the combination of the horizontal and the sludge leg that got me thinking about how much is left in the tank when the level gets below the sludge leg. They also need to be pretty much level to get the most out before running dry at the pipe.

                      Never seen any like that, had oil heat where I grew up, tank like that, vertical, down in the basement at the bottom of the stairs. The old oil burner was replaced with a gas conversion, and then decades later, the cast iron natural circulation boiler was replaced by a little bitty gas sectional boiler.
                      Totally agree, it's not the most efficient way of utilizing the tanks "clean oil" capacity efficiently. That style of tank does meet a niche market need, although not required in this instance. Perhaps she switches over to the full tank when one is down to a quarter.
                      I'd do it differently myself but obviously she feels comfortable doing what has worked for her.
                      It doesn't have to make sense to us, only to her. Right or wrong.
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post
                        The tanks that Ridgerunner installed are obviously meant for a horizontal application rather than a vertical install as they do have fittings for the legs and plumbing installed in order to suit a horizontal install.
                        He also mentioned previously that the lady he did the install for wanted the new tanks installed just like her late husband had done 40 years prior. She did not want to deviate too much from what he had done.

                        I have seen literally thousands of these tanks in the past from not only having filled way too many of them but also having sold them for years.
                        Granted 95+% of them are mounted vertically but the the tanks that are installed in the lay-down configuration do have their place. Mostly when the home owner does not want an unsightly external tank and either doesn't want one in the basement, or simple doesn't have a basement but does have a crawl space that he can tuck the tank into. When vertical space is at a premium this type of tank is the answer.

                        However having said that that I can't remember having seen them installed this way. It's not wrong, it's just different, and it is a very professional install while meeting the wishes of the lady that paid to have the work done.
                        Places like Home Depot and Lowes sell the horizontal tanks so there must be a market for them. I got these from the manufacturer and they had 13 horizontals in stock at the time.
                        There was no pay involved. I could never repay her for for the help she and her late husband gave me through the years..

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          That's fine, it was the combination of the horizontal and the sludge leg that got me thinking about how much is left in the tank when the level gets below the sludge leg. They also need to be pretty much level to get the most out before running dry at the pipe.

                          Never seen any like that, had oil heat where I grew up, tank like that, vertical, down in the basement at the bottom of the stairs. The old oil burner was replaced with a gas conversion, and then decades later, the cast iron natural circulation boiler was replaced by a little bitty gas sectional boiler.
                          Below is a picture of the old tanks while I was pumping to the new tanks. Notice where the old tanks had their outlets about 3-4 inches from the bottom of the tanks from the factory. 3 inches in a horizontal tank is 23 gallons. The sludge nipple I put in was 3 inches long and because of where the bung was located probably stuck in to the tank 2 1/2". 2 1/2" of fuel in a horizontal tank is 19 gallons. Installation of tanks require 1/4" of fall per foot of tank length minimum. In post #3, I stated I made 2 of the legs longer to give fall of the fuel to the outlet. From the 19 gallons, some of this amount left would have to be deducted because of this angle which is beyond my math skills. The whole amount of fuel or sludge left at the bottom is moot in a way because no one is going to let their tanks go empty, or run them empty in the winter before refilling. The tanks have to sit without use for 24 hours after filling to let sludge and condensation settle.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	old tanks.jpg Views:	0 Size:	102.2 KB ID:	1897439
                          Last edited by Ridgerunner; 09-06-2020, 02:59 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Willy View Post

                            Totally agree, it's not the most efficient way of utilizing the tanks "clean oil" capacity efficiently. That style of tank does meet a niche market need, although not required in this instance. Perhaps she switches over to the full tank when one is down to a quarter.
                            I'd do it differently myself but obviously she feels comfortable doing what has worked for her.
                            It doesn't have to make sense to us, only to her. Right or wrong.
                            For what it is worth, the tanks are used manifolded together (and always were previously) but there is a separate shut off valve on each tank.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              The lady is very lucky to have a craftsman doing the work for her rather than a cowboy.

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