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Lathe tailstock casting repair?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Peter. View Post
    That's a rather gruesome looking casting. I would cut the other one off (before it also breaks) and file the bases flat then bolt a square block of steel down to the base for the screws to jack against.
    That's the first thing that came to mind. Looks like a pile of volcanic slag and obviously not very strong.

    I don't think I would attempt to braze it as the heat may vaporize that horrible casting and you don't know what the heat transfer will do to the rest of the casting. It may warp it beyond use. Then you've created another problem. You could probably drill and tap it and secure the broken piece with a screw. Not a good design with two separate posts to push off of but you shouldn't need a lot of force to move the TS in either direction providing the base bolts have been loosened up enough.


    JL..............

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      Just use a longer screw so they both push on the remaining pillar.
      Simple.

      -D
      This is probably the easiest way out, and the way it should have been designed in the first place.

      JL...............

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      • #33
        Mill the base of the broken part and the side flat, (where finger touches in lower pic) so that an L shaped bit can be epoxied and screwed to the casting using socket head screws. Shouldn't require any real precision, as log as it's rigid and the flat is in the proper place for the set screw to hold.

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        • #34
          nickel-city-fab Appreciate the thought of donating a casting. Such is the way of things though and the experience of fixing it will probably do me good anyway.

          Captain K That's pretty much where I started off thinking but with a screw instead of a pin. Given that the edges of the break ought to locate the part, the screw would only need to clamp so simpler might actually work best.

          I'll get it in the mill table and see more accurately where things would come through and if there's enough material left to thread.

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          • #35
            JoeLee I suspect the locking set screws were what caused the problem in the first place - or rather failing to realise they were locks for the side-to-side adjustment rather that an angle adjustment. They're tiny too and easy to miss - the paint job is every bit as good as the casting and even turns a rag red if you should run it when you clean up.
            My first inclination was to join the two posts for stability but the shaft of the camlock runs through the middle and prevents that.

            It'll be a little while before I can get some time to work on this but I'll be sure to come back with some pictures and results....if not further problems!

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
              JoeLee I suspect the locking set screws were what caused the problem in the first place - or rather failing to realise they were locks for the side-to-side adjustment rather that an angle adjustment. They're tiny too and easy to miss - the paint job is every bit as good as the casting and even turns a rag red if you should run it when you clean up.
              My first inclination was to join the two posts for stability but the shaft of the camlock runs through the middle and prevents that.

              It'll be a little while before I can get some time to work on this but I'll be sure to come back with some pictures and results....if not further problems!
              Typical of cheap chinese made equipment. They use some kind of air dry alkyd enamel or worse. Way worse than the old Dupont Dulux enamel was. The stuff stays gooey for months and when you open the crate it smells like it was just painted minutes ago.

              JL.............

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              • #37
                Interesting. It never occurred to me that it might take months to dry; I'd just assumed it was permanently naff. Might have to check whether it still rubs off or whether it's stabilised by now.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                  Interesting. It never occurred to me that it might take months to dry; I'd just assumed it was permanently naff. Might have to check whether it still rubs off or whether it's stabilised by now.
                  Willing to bet I might be just plain old linseed based oil paint much like the old-time RustOleum. Beware of the pigments though -- certain red pigments are quite toxic.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                    Willing to bet I might be just plain old linseed based oil paint much like the old-time RustOleum. Beware of the pigments though -- certain red pigments are quite toxic.
                    I shall try to refrain from licking it!
                    More seriously though, it could be a reason to not try brazing it!

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Cenedd View Post

                      I shall try to refrain from licking it!
                      More seriously though, it could be a reason to not try brazing it!
                      I would simply strip or grind off as much as possible while using a chemical respirator. Some of the hardcore artists supply catalogs discuss proper PPE and safe handling for certain antique or classical pigments that are based on things like mercury, cadmium, and lead.

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                      • #41
                        Thanks for the warning. I did recently invest in a respirator in an attempt to live long enough to get dangerous at this hobby I'd probably need the ABEK1P3 filters rather than just the P3 that I have. I'll try the 'cold' fix first and save anything that might require crossing this particular bridge as a last resort. Good to be aware of the issue though - it's not something that had crossed my mind to be honest.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                          Thanks for the warning. I did recently invest in a respirator in an attempt to live long enough to get dangerous at this hobby I'd probably need the ABEK1P3 filters rather than just the P3 that I have. I'll try the 'cold' fix first and save anything that might require crossing this particular bridge as a last resort. Good to be aware of the issue though - it's not something that had crossed my mind to be honest.
                          I believe Kremer Pigments is in Toronto... I had their catalog and dreamed of buying my pigments there.. they make you sign a legal form before buying some of them due to the toxicity. But Kremer is where the hardcore classical types go, because they have all the old formulas. If your mask stops dust and particles then its probably good enough.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                            Interesting. It never occurred to me that it might take months to dry; I'd just assumed it was permanently naff. Might have to check whether it still rubs off or whether it's stabilised by now.
                            I don't think that crap paint ever really dries. By the time it hardens up it's cracked and falling off.

                            JL................

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                              I believe Kremer Pigments is in Toronto... I had their catalog and dreamed of buying my pigments there.. they make you sign a legal form before buying some of them due to the toxicity. But Kremer is where the hardcore classical types go, because they have all the old formulas. If your mask stops dust and particles then its probably good enough.
                              Haven't all the good old paint formulas been regulated out of existence ?? I know they have been constantly changing and most not for the better. take Rustoleum for example. The stuff sucks now. Poor coverage and it chalks out in about a year. the only thing that hasn't changes is it's sticky gooey over spray and it 1 week dry time. A lot of exterior house paints are the same.

                              JL..................

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                                Haven't all the good old paint formulas been regulated out of existence ?? I know they have been constantly changing and most not for the better. take Rustoleum for example. The stuff sucks now. Poor coverage and it chalks out in about a year. the only thing that hasn't changes is it's sticky gooey over spray and it 1 week dry time. A lot of exterior house paints are the same.

                                JL..................
                                No, they have not been regulated out of existence, but they are highly regulated even for artists use. Typically an artist will only buy in quantities of a kilogram or less (bulk pigment powder) and that supply could last a while However they are trained in proper PPE and safety. The reason why these colors cannot be mass marketed is because the paint companies would be sued out of existence by homeowners etc.

                                Once the pigment is mixed with a vehicle or binder, (made into paint) it becomes far less dangerous -- but you still have to use proper caution in handling.

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