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10 mm square socket

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  • #16
    Looks good Lew.

    i've made things like that by milling a slot in round, welding on a cap then turning it round again or forging. Drill hole, heat to red, hammer in a square former with some inerference in the corners then tap the sides in. Turn nice and round afterward
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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    • #17
      That's well done. Next time google for DIN 904

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ikdor View Post
        That's well done. Next time google for DIN 904
        Probably not that great availability on US side.
        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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        • #19
          It's done now, so any more ideas would just be that- ideas. Here's one- start with some 1/8 thick angle iron. Cut two pieces about 2 inches long, then saw away enough of the sides so the pieces can come together around the 10 mm square head. File out the two corners for a good fit. Then turn whatever you need for a handle and insert that between the two pieces, using a 10 mm square head to aid in the positioning. A bit of welding has it assembled. If you had some 10mm square stock to use as part of the handle, it would be easier to position the other two pieces around it.

          If no welding is to be done, you can still use this method by assembling with JB Weld. After bonding, add a layer of JB around the outside and wrap on several layers of a tough thread, like dacron or similar. Keep saturating the layers with JB until you have enough layers on, or you have reached the point where the diameter is about to become too large.

          An option here is to use a 3/8 drive point to space the two pieces at one end, and the 10 mm square to space the other end. Then do the JB and dacron wrapping to hold it together. You end up with a socket that a standard 3/8 drive will fit, with the required 10 mm square drive on the other end.

          Another option would be to start with a piece of 1/2 inch square steel tube. That would have a 3/8 ID if it's actually .063 material, and it might have a 10 mm ID if it's .050 material. You could always saw the four corners and swage the sides out a bit if need be- in which case you would have to bond a wrap of tensile material around the outside. I mentioned dacron- you could always use some carbon fiber instead. You have the option to use a long enough piece of steel tubing so it's the drive shaft as well, and reinforce the entire length with JB and fiber.

          Just thinking a little outside the box- or tubing-
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #20
            Or, just go to the local Autozone or whatever auto parts you have, and get a 10mm 12-point socket for $7. Weld some kind of t-handle shank on it, take a skim cut to clean up, done. Figure your fastener head has 4 points and that divides evenly into 12.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by darryl View Post
              It's done now, so any more ideas would just be that- ideas. Here's one- start with some 1/8 thick angle iron. Cut two pieces about 2 inches long, then saw away enough of the sides so the pieces can come together around the 10 mm square head. File out the two corners for a good fit. Then turn whatever you need for a handle and insert that between the two pieces, using a 10 mm square head to aid in the positioning. A bit of welding has it assembled. If you had some 10mm square stock to use as part of the handle, it would be easier to position the other two pieces around it.

              If no welding is to be done, you can still use this method by assembling with JB Weld. After bonding, add a layer of JB around the outside and wrap on several layers of a tough thread, like dacron or similar. Keep saturating the layers with JB until you have enough layers on, or you have reached the point where the diameter is about to become too large.-
              I did think of the two pieces of angle but none appeared in my "stock room" . And wrapping with "string and JB" just makes me shudder. :-) + I don't do welding, tried it years ago and gave it up as a bad idea. :-)
              ...lew...

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              • #22
                String and JB- maybe we can get the King of Random to test this idea. I did just watch a vid last night that showed the holding power of several various compounds- JB beat every one of them by a wide margin. I don't give JB a chance in hail of keeping a home made socket together by itself, but with one of the strong fibers embedded it should meet or even beat some of the sockets- especially when they have a thin wall.

                Brings up an interesting question- some sockets are obviously crap, but the better ones- how does the strength of the steel in those compare to the strong fibers of today?
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  Brings up an interesting question- some sockets are obviously crap, but the better ones- how does the strength of the steel in those compare to the strong fibers of today?
                  If humans could make cobwebs, steel would be obsolete overnight.

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                  • #24
                    I hate to burst your bubble, but a 12 point socket is sized for a hexagon, not a square. A 10 mm square will not fit inside a 10 mm, 12 point socket. You would need a 14mm (edit: 12.25mm actually), 12 point socket and even then, it is just a bit too small so there should be some allowance for that: slightly rounded corners on the square head would do.

                    A 9/16" hex or 12 point socket may work (14.29mm), but there would be a lot of extra space in it and you might just round over that square head.

                    Edit: My 14mm figure was incorrect. Blame it on too little sleep.



                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                    Or, just go to the local Autozone or whatever auto parts you have, and get a 10mm 12-point socket for $7. Weld some kind of t-handle shank on it, take a skim cut to clean up, done. Figure your fastener head has 4 points and that divides evenly into 12.
                    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 09-15-2020, 02:22 AM.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      I hate to burst your bubble, but a 12 point socket is sized for a hexagon, not a square.
                      Hrmm, you're right. (sin of 45 vs sin of 60) But for some reason I have not run into problems with it in real life. Granted I have only tried it with Imperial sizes.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        I hate to burst your bubble, but a 12 point socket is sized for a hexagon, not a square. A 10 mm square will not fit inside a 10 mm, 12 point socket. You would need a 14mm, 12 point socket and even then, it is just a bit too small so there should be some allowance for that: slightly rounded corners on the square head would do.

                        A 9/16" hex or 12 point socket may work (14.29mm), but there would be a lot of extra space in it and you might just round over that square head.



                        Isn’t 12-point also measured same way as 6- point ie accross the flats? 1/2” 12-point fits to 1/2” hex head. So should be same size for hex and square.
                        Corners can slightly bind with the combo but actual socket often have sort of corner relief so even that is unlikely issue.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                          Or, just go to the local Autozone or whatever auto parts you have, and get a 10mm 12-point socket for $7. Weld some kind of t-handle shank on it, take a skim cut to clean up, done. Figure your fastener head has 4 points and that divides evenly into 12.
                          This wont fit. For a 10mm square you will need a 12.2mm 12 point drive.
                          Helder Ferreira
                          Setubal, Portugal

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Noitoen View Post

                            This wont fit. For a 10mm square you will need a 12.2mm 12 point drive.
                            Paul says 14mm, you say 12.2mm and I'd say 10mm probably fits...

                            Triple square(XZN) is measured in different way but it is not same as 12-point (double hex) socket
                            Last edited by MattiJ; 09-14-2020, 04:15 AM.
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                            • #29
                              12-point double hex dimension W:


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                              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                              • #30
                                XZN or triple square d1:
                                https://www.fastenerdata.co.uk/faste...-din34824.html

                                and then we have even 12-point "quad-triangle" sometimes also called spline drive
                                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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