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  • Russian machinists.

    Some interesting stuff comes out of Russia.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZkpvM4kGvs

  • #2
    I've learned that Russian machinists is usually a bad idea, just like rushing your proctologist is a bad idea. After all, when they're Finnish, they're Finnish.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      I have seen some of his videos but this was new to me. Interesting tool, newer seen one like that.
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • #4
        Tool was able to shrink surprisingly thick walled workpiece by a large amount and with what looked like only moderate feed force!

        edit: I think it was mostly visual trick with oil running on the workpiece. Can someone tell what he is saying at around 4:25 about size reduction?

        BTW this might be a perfect use for those scrap-auto sourced tungsten carbide balls. Some CV joints have tungsten carbide balls rolling against sort of rough-finished races.
        Last edited by MattiJ; 09-07-2020, 04:21 PM.
        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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        • #5
          I have that same micrometer
          Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Roller burnishing has been used in manufacturing for 60 years in the US, Ballizing is a related process where a very precise diameter ball is pressed through a bore bringing it to size with an excellent surface finish.

            I have always been surprised that more home shop machinists do not use this method as it delivers most everything that a hobbyist desires, close diameters and superb finishes. I can only assume that cost deters most from doing it.

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            • #7
              Ive seen this before using a simple bearing used for lining things in a 3 jaw .This is a heavy duty one but how do you know how much it can roll to get consistent results.

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              • #8
                What effect does ball size have on finish? I have some down hole check valves that are 1.25 and 1.50:diameter, with a mirror finish.! They are harder than the hubs of hell, as they were used in an oilwell pump 6000 feet down.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
                  What effect does ball size have on finish? I have some down hole check valves that are 1.25 and 1.50:diameter, with a mirror finish.! They are harder than the hubs of hell, as they were used in an oilwell pump 6000 feet down.
                  They have been finish machined already.
                  Ballizing is a Finishing Process, you do not want to resize a bore this way. If you press a a 1.5005" carbide ball through a stable 1.499" bore you end up with a 1.500 bore with a burnished finish.

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                  • #10
                    https://cogsdill.com/products/burnishing-tools/

                    We used burnishing tools at work for valve stems, packing bores, bearing sizes and anywhere a super finish was required.
                    Beaver County Alberta Canada

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by danlb View Post
                      I've learned that Russian machinists is usually a bad idea, just like rushing your proctologist is a bad idea. After all, when they're Finnish, they're Finnish.
                      Hey! I see what you did there. Cause after all without the Russians Finland woulda been Germanland (for a second). JR

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                      • #12
                        Dont we have a new partner here from that neck of the woods?

                        I hope we are not really serious about someone elses machining ability? Cause I would have to break out a photo of my last job. Horrific at best. JR

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                          Can someone tell what he is saying at around 4:25 about size reduction?
                          He said .01mm (dia. reduction).
                          In his previous videos the reduction was .01-.055mm (more reduction was in stainless steel)

                          His goal is to increase surface hardness. In one of the older videos he demonstrated surface hardness increase from about 25% (for harder steel) to about 100-250% for softer steels. Stainless steel gained the most.
                          Last edited by MichaelP; 09-08-2020, 02:46 AM.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
                            He said .01mm (dia. reduction).
                            In his previous videos the reduction was .01-.055mm (more reduction was in stainless steel)

                            His goal is to increase surface hardness. In one of the older videos he demonstrated surface hardness increase from about 25% (for harder steel) to about 100-250% for softer steels. Stainless steel gained the most.
                            How do you know what he said. I cant hold tolerances of .01mm so its not going to be of any help to me.

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                            • #15
                              Writing in the 1930s, the late Fred. H. Colvin reported that roller finished cylindrical surfaces had a high grade finish, but the process produced a wavy, out of round finish with micro cracks in the surface when examined under a microscope.
                              So, what is the difference between roller burnishing as practiced in the 1930s, and roller burnishing 21st century style?
                              'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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