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What are your Fears ? What process or procedure is holding you back?

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  • #46
    Pressing the cycle start button for the first time.

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    • #47
      RB211,

      But that is the laundry machines that you hopefully do at least once a week. 🛀 Not sure that is a fear factor process.

      TX
      mr fixit
      Chris

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      • #48
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        Pressing the cycle start button for the first time.
        Just remember, the CNC isn't going to do anything you didn't tell it to........It's just a dumb machine that can't think for itself.

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        • #49
          I really don't fear anything manual or cnc, Ill give it a shot, and generally succeed. Of course, my path to this point has been littered with failures, some just depressing, some spectacular and a couple of life threating near misses.

          Heck, my cnc mill pendant stop button failed a year ago. Just don't seem to need it like I once did.

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          • #50
            FJK:
            "It starts with plugging the machines in :-(
            I bought the Grizz. Mini lathe and mill. Few years ago and have been sort of slowly learning stuff
            but haven’t spent as much time as I’d like

            now that I’m more or less retired I have less free time :-/

            sigh
            someday
            maybe
            i hope
            kinda sorta
            the sun’ll come out tomorrow!"

            f
            Totally true that there is less free time after retirement!

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            • #51
              Why is that?
              why less time when you are retired?
              I thought I was the only one......

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              • #52
                and the posts about difficulty parting.....
                I built a heavy, sturdy bench for my little Logan lathe,
                parting was THE most noticeable improvement of the heavy bench.
                Holy Smokes what an improvement !!

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Ringo View Post
                  and the posts about difficulty parting.....
                  I built a heavy, sturdy bench for my little Logan lathe,
                  parting was THE most noticeable improvement of the heavy bench.
                  Holy Smokes what an improvement !!
                  I'm hoping to put a concrete top on mine someday, that should stiffen it up a bit.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                    I'm hoping to put a concrete top on mine someday, that should stiffen it up a bit.
                    I used to cringe to use my Logan, it would chatter, bad finish, couldn't hold a number (diameter)
                    I re-adjusted bearing preload, and built the bench, now it is almost fun to use

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                      Getting old and/or moving shop
                      Like my Dad used to say- "getting old isn't for wimps"
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                        These are the jobs that tighten my chest.....Performing the last operations on an expensive piece of material that you've already got a ton of time in. I just pushed go on this program. Clearance is clearance.....

                        That's a $2k chunk of aluminum, with about 25 hours into it so far. Last 3 ops are picking the small internal corners out with a universal head. 4.3" deep cavity, trying to blend into previous surfaces with a 1/4" ball. Fun times....Only 2 more to go.

                        After doing stuff like this for years, every other machining op seems easy and straight forward. But every once in a while I'll get paralyzed with fear of screwing something up and have to push through it. I just tell myself there's nothing to it but to do it, and get on with it. I honestly like working outside of my comfort zone. Its where learning and progress happens. It is stressful though.....
                        Same here, my biggest dread is tapping holes, especially small ones. I had 16 each 3/8-16 bottomed holes to go in axially on the outer face and 4 each 10-24 on the inner boss. Large diameter 6061 round bar is always gummy near the middle and this was in spades. I usually make these out of 2-1/4" plate, but couldn't get any this go around on short notice. Those 10-24's were a butt clinch.


                        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

                          Just remember, the CNC isn't going to do anything you didn't tell it to........It's just a dumb machine that can't think for itself.
                          Lately been having a blast with the little CNC router.

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                          • #58
                            what really gets me is paying the outrageous (swiss) price for a big piece of stock and then removing most of it.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                              ain't using them. I'm using an AXA #7 holder with a 3/32 blade. What gets me is why does it dig in sometimes? When it seems like everything is going perfectly till half way thru then BANG and your suddenly having a bad day.
                              I found that mine did that. If I was watching the compound instead of the tool I'd see something sort of jump. In order to figure it out, I set up dial indicators between the moving parts;
                              1) saddle to ways
                              2) cross slide to saddle
                              3) compound to cross slide.

                              Then I simply pressed down on the end of the parting tool. When I did that I could see that the right side of the cross-slide was moving up when I pressed down. The cross slide gib is on the right side. I adjusted (tightened) the gib until it did not move when I pressed down on the tool. I did the same with the compound gib. The saddle gibs were already adjusted properly.

                              The change was wonderful. No more unexpected digging in.

                              I looked up the weights for the parts that make up the saddle, compound, etc and found that it was not very heavy. Less than 10 pounds for the saddle and apron. A few more pounds for the slides and tool holders. The same equipment on a 14x40 lathe looks like it weighs 10 times more. It makes sense that a large Hardinge saddle would not be lifted by the cutting action like it might on a small lathe.

                              Dan
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

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                              • #60
                                What scares me is when I'm given a broken/damaged part that is one of a kind that needs to be fixed. It's hard to predict the results when you can't even be sure what the metal is. If you melt it / crush it / gouge it, game's over.

                                Dan
                                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                                Location: SF East Bay.

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