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What are your Fears ? What process or procedure is holding you back?

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  • #61
    I am a bit fearful of learning how to weld. I have a 100A Harbor Freight welder I've never powered up, much less made sparks. I probably should have someone show me the basics first. It's just a little scary to try it on my own.
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
    USA Maryland 21030

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

      Just remember, the CNC isn't going to do anything you didn't tell it to........It's just a dumb machine that can't think for itself.
      The question I ask before I press the start is, "just what did I tell it to do and what will be the repair cost if I told it something wrong?"

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      • #63
        Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
        I am a bit fearful of learning how to weld. I have a 100A Harbor Freight welder I've never powered up, much less made sparks. I probably should have someone show me the basics first. It's just a little scary to try it on my own.
        youtube.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
          I am a bit fearful of learning how to weld. I have a 100A Harbor Freight welder I've never powered up, much less made sparks. I probably should have someone show me the basics first. It's just a little scary to try it on my own.
          The basics are you use the heat generated by the electric arc to melt a bit of both pieces of metal and add some similar metal to fill in any gaps. From there you can spend many hours and dollars getting beyond the basics. Grab a couple pieces of scrap steel, hold them down to something solid, and give it a try. Be close enough to the welder that you can reach the power switch if necessary. With only 100 amp you will need to size the rod and metal appropriately if it is a stick welder. If it is a MIG you will have to play with the feed rate of the wire.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Ringo View Post
            Why is that?
            why less time when you are retired?
            I thought I was the only one......


            it’s due to a little known combination of the laws of thermodynamics and relativity that I developed while getting my PhD from the East Virginia Institute of Technology and Cosmetology:

            Due to the increasing entropy of the universe the honey-do list is always expanding, and due to the nonlinear expansion of the universe the list expands at ever greater speeds (the same as the redshift of galaxies, which increases the farther the galaxies are from us). On the other hand, relativity says that we cannot expand our shops, tool collections, parts supplies, or skills & abilities at a rate to keep ahead of honey-do-expansion since it would eventually cause those things to expand at speeds greater than the speed of light. Also, it would reduce entropy & cause the universe to collapse in a Big Crunch.

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            • #66
              PAUL , BEST ADVICE I can give you is pick your Amps by size of welding rod in thousandths of an inch.
              ie 1/16 is 60 amps... 1/8 is 125 amps. ...it's a start point...... always worked for me...
              yeah not the regular formula... but I use my own if I can simplify and it works...

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              • #67
                Originally posted by fjk View Post



                it’s due to a little known combination of the laws of thermodynamics and relativity that I developed while getting my PhD from the East Virginia Institute of Technology and Cosmetology:

                Due to the increasing entropy of the universe the honey-do list is always expanding, and due to the nonlinear expansion of the universe the list expands at ever greater speeds (the same as the redshift of galaxies, which increases the farther the galaxies are from us). On the other hand, relativity says that we cannot expand our shops, tool collections, parts supplies, or skills & abilities at a rate to keep ahead of honey-do-expansion since it would eventually cause those things to expand at speeds greater than the speed of light. Also, it would reduce entropy & cause the universe to collapse in a Big Crunch.
                Have you heard of Heisenberg's expanded uncertainty principle? Basically the mere act of thinking you know what your wife wants, causes her to change her mind.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #68
                  Ok, this is really my biggest problem, laziness. My biggest hurdle is actually getting started. Once I am started, I might as well be on the spectrum because nothing, except a crying wife will get my attention to stop what I am doing.
                  My rotary table is still unused, my CNC mill is still not operational to what I would like.
                  Lets talk about the CNC mill. It has a full blown Centroid CNC controller, it does everything. The ballscrews with their backlash, yes, backlash piss me off. There shouldn't be any. They are not double ball nuts. I have to chase down the "slop" and also calibrate the turns with the steppers. The stepper driver is set hard to 10 microstepping. I don't want microstepping to that degree, rather have more confidence in actual steps than theoretical precision which is lost in the slop. Hell, I wish it was CLOSED LOOP, my perfectionist brain is exploding, it bothers me!!! Today my new spindle motor comes, a 1/3rd HP 3 phase inverter duty motor, and hopefully soon, my new VFD also arrives which integrates perfectly with the ACORN controller.
                  Lets talk about the spindle motor... Everyone else is using some crappy sewing machine motor with some crappy controller that was never designed to be interfaced to a CNC controller. I refused to comply, so I went with a 3 phase motor that weighs 18 lbs and is HUGE compared to what would be ideal. I want my VFD damn it!!!! If I have to add linear rails to the Z and put a bigger stepper or servo on it, or a counter weight, so be it!!! Money being an issue is WAY OUT THE DOOR at this point. This thing is my Spruce Goose at this point, and all reason and logic no longer apply to this new universe, and I am going crazy like Howard Hughes.
                  Now to FURTHER rub salt into the wound, I ordered one of those cheap 3018 toy CNC routers that are half plastic with a crappy cheap GRBL controller. THE DAMN THING WORKS OUT OF THE BOX AND HAS BEEN A JOY TO USE!!!! How much money is in my CNC mill? 5000? 7000? This piece of **** toy is 180$ and I am cutting USEFUL parts out of it!! WTF???? I've already sent another 100$ out the door to make it better, put linear rails on it because I love it so much!!! This is how CNC should be!
                  For [email protected]&#*@# sake, LOOK at this part. It has beautiful radius's, counter sunk holes, bores and a slot! I would of spent half the damn day 3D printing this mockup part to test things and have shrinkage and failed prints to contend with! Instead the CNC TOY router did this in what seems like 15 minutes!!!! Or the horror, I guess I could of taken out the rotary table and milled it out of Aluminum. Too lazy for that.

                  At this point, I am not going to stop working on the Taig CNC mill until it weighs 500+ lbs with an epoxy granite base, has all linear rails, servos, and resembles a miniature VMC. Screw it, nothing to lose at this point. Maybe this is my real interest, doing this crap instead of actually making something.
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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by danlb View Post
                    What scares me is when I'm given a broken/damaged part that is one of a kind that needs to be fixed. It's hard to predict the results when you can't even be sure what the metal is. If you melt it / crush it / gouge it, game's over.

                    Dan
                    +1

                    Also 0-80 taps, and drills smaller than #60
                    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                    Oregon, USA

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                      I am a bit fearful of learning how to weld. I have a 100A Harbor Freight welder I've never powered up, much less made sparks. I probably should have someone show me the basics first. It's just a little scary to try it on my own.
                      I feel for ya. I have a VERY healthy respect for electricity. I'll jump a foot if there is a crackling noise while I'm working on wiring. I also watched too many horror movies when I was a kid where the bad guy was burned to death by molten metal. Add the two together and welding becomes a nightmare in real life.

                      But now I have two welders and an oxy/propane rig.

                      Here's what it took for me: I never did power up the 100 amp HF stick welder. I finally gave it away. Research said that MIG or flux core made a lot less splatter. That meant the death or disfigurement from molten metal was less likely. I also read up on PPE and found that small metal beads tend not to stick to tight weave cotton. I spent a small fortune (not really) on a fire resistant jacket, leather gloves, etc at the local welding shop. When I dress up I look like a goon, but have not been burned yet. Education reassured me that I was not going to be electrocuted by a low voltage, high amp device that was properly connected.

                      So a cheap 100 amp flux core "mig" from HF was the next purchase. I found a nice big empty place in the middle of the nice green back yard lawn and followed all the instructions online (weldingweb.com), in the manual and Youtube university. I set up a portable work table and put a sheetmetal top on it. A large fire extinguisher was at the ready. Yes, the sparks go every where. Yes it's kind of scary when you see the metal melting under your arc. It's also really, really neat to form new shapes out of scraps of steel. That is what got me past the fear of welding.

                      I rounded out my "education" by going to "classes" at local industrial arts places. I got 8 to 16 hours of instructions and hands on time with each type of welding. Not enough to be great at anything, but enough that I was able to recognize what SHOULD be happening when I got home and tried it myself with my equipment. I gave away the flux core, picked up a nice little MIG. Then I got a nice mid sized (200 amp) TIG for the things that MIG did not do well. I don't think twice about welding any more.

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

                        The question I ask before I press the start is, "just what did I tell it to do and what will be the repair cost if I told it something wrong?"
                        Does the control not have a graphic display of the tool paths? The 1990's lathes that I often run have nice displays that you can run through block by block, however this does not tell you if there are work holding elements or fixtures in the way (-:

                        Always remember that rapid moves travel from the current position to the next commanded position by the shortest route possible, if there is anything in that path it will crash. Some controls have a Program Verification Function, this will not allow something like turning an OD using a tool registered as a drill in a canned cycle. This feature may be disabled if you really wish to do so.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post

                          Does the control not have a graphic display of the tool paths? The 1990's lathes that I often run have nice displays that you can run through block by block, however this does not tell you if there are work holding elements or fixtures in the way (-:

                          Always remember that rapid moves travel from the current position to the next commanded position by the shortest route possible, if there is anything in that path it will crash. Some controls have a Program Verification Function, this will not allow something like turning an OD using a tool registered as a drill in a canned cycle. This feature may be disabled if you really wish to do so.
                          I put together my CNC from a Harbor Freight mini mill and use a Raspberry Pi to drive the Arduino that controls the steppers. Since I had minimal experience with milling and none on CNC this was an interesting ride. Couple that with no CAD experience nor CAM and it has become a real mind challenge, just what I needed. The Raspberry Pi can run Universal Gcode Sender or bCNC. One of these sort of shows the toolpath, the other does not as the Pi doesn't have sufficient power for that. The advantage of the Pi is that it has no moving parts and by mounting it high upon the wall behind the mill I avoid bits of swarf on it. This will never be a real milling center but the point of it was to make something that was a challenge and if I learn on it, that knowledge can be extrapolated to bigger machines. I really admire those of you with the machining background and the ability to make things that just aren't possible with my equipment. Eventually, perhaps even this winter, I want to build a CNC controlled router with a much bigger work envelope than the mini mill, not for any practical reason but because of the challenge of it.

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                          • #73
                            learning CAD has me stumped. Not necessarily because I don't understand it or I'm not smart enough, it's just that I always have other difficult things to do (home or work) and I just never find the time to gain any kind of momentum with it. Perhaps getting my 3D printer down to the garage and an enclosure built will help.

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                            • #74
                              I am a bit fearful of learning how to weld.
                              If there is a community college in your area with evening adult education classes, check it out. Well worth the cost to get the basics and practice under an experienced eye.
                              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                              • #75
                                Not fear so much as frustration. That "now that I'm retired" thing (finally happened a couple of months ago), and a severe shortage of Round Tuits. The local suppliers just don't seem to carry them. Even Amazon prime doesn't help. I guess I'll have to learn to manufacture my own. Maybe there's a you tube channel that can help. Oh, wait a minute...
                                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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