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  • British Standard Pipe Threads

    I want to make an adapter to adapt 1/4” BSPT to 1/8” BPST.
    Are these threads metric?

  • #2
    I think there is a clue in the 1/4" but can't quite put my finger on it. 😁

    Comment


    • #3
      I I think you may be right but 1/4” is really close to metric and could have an inch diameter with metric threads!
      I don’t put anything past the convoluted ideas engineers come up with!
      Cars today are half metric and half SAE !

      Comment


      • #4
        https://www.ryco.com.au/technical/th...-bspp-threads/
        Inch
        Last edited by redlee; 09-11-2020, 02:22 PM.
        Beaver County Alberta Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          McMaster carr carries bspt fittings in several matals- a reduction coupling in steel is $2.33.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
            McMaster carr carries bspt fittings in several matals- a reduction coupling in steel is $2.33.
            I bought some last week, 3/8 BSPP to 3/8 NPT.
            Hex nipple no less.
            A wonderful thing.

            -Doozer
            DZER

            Comment


            • #7
              BSPP/BSPT are 55 Degree Whitworth thread form, some have different leads from NPT/NPS threads.
              For instance 1/4 NPT has an 18 TPI lead, 1/4 BSPT has a 19 TPI lead.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                BSPP/BSPT are 55 Degree Whitworth thread form, some have different leads from NPT/NPS threads.
                For instance 1/4 NPT has an 18 TPI lead, 1/4 BSPT has a 19 TPI lead.
                IIRC only one size had same thread pitch.
                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                • #9
                  A lot of hydraulic cylinders are using BSPP now. A few years ago, you never heard about it much. It was NPT, SAE or JIC.I don't know why they had to scank-up hydraulics in the US.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                    A lot of hydraulic cylinders are using BSPP now. A few years ago, you never heard about it much. It was NPT, SAE or JIC.I don't know why they had to scank-up hydraulics in the US.
                    Probably because its most common fitting standard in rest of the world. Its weird that it is commonly used in metric countries.
                    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                      A lot of hydraulic cylinders are using BSPP now. A few years ago, you never heard about it much. It was NPT, SAE or JIC.I don't know why they had to scank-up hydraulics in the US.
                      Possibly ISO requirements perhaps? Who knows

                      We have a rather large customer that we have been making parts for for the last 40 years that went through ISO 9000 certification a decade or so ago, we make the same parts from the same drawings but many have metric dimensions, what used to be .500" on the drawings is now 12.7 MM, .625" is now 15.875 MM. I often spend the first hour of a job converting metric dimensions to inches and hand writing them on the drawings.

                      I prefer the metric system as it is far simpler, however at 60 years of age I am simply not buying $20,000 worth of new tools when I can simply multiply/divide the dimensions by 25.4 with a $12.00 calculator. There are also customers that send drawings that are basically metric parts with inch dimensions or a mix of both.
                      Behold

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am simply not buying $20,000 worth of new tools when I can simply multiply/divide the dimensions by 25.4 with a $12.00 calculator.
                        And I'm not spending $12 on a calculator when one from the dollar store does all I need! But yeah, numbers are cheap, tools not so much. My old boss in the software biz used to say something like - "Don't worry about bumping up the version number, we have an endless supply."
                        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post

                          Possibly ISO requirements perhaps? Who knows

                          We have a rather large customer that we have been making parts for for the last 40 years that went through ISO 9000 certification a decade or so ago, we make the same parts from the same drawings but many have metric dimensions, what used to be .500" on the drawings is now 12.7 MM, .625" is now 15.875 MM. I often spend the first hour of a job converting metric dimensions to inches and hand writing them on the drawings.
                          ISO 9000 has nothing to do with using metric dimensions. Where did you get that ????

                          -Doozer
                          DZER

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fine and dandy but the BSPP dimensions are in inches, including the threads. What's wrong with SAE? They both need seals. Most heavy machinery used JIC. Now they've created another sealing angle for that. They only did it to control the supply--Make it more proprietary. Hydraulic shops now have to maintain higher inventories. The BSPP is not any better, just different.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                              ISO 9000 has nothing to do with using metric dimensions. Where did you get that ????

                              -Doozer
                              Created from thin air of course, please try and keep up.

                              Comment

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