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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bented View Post

    Created from thin air of course, please try and keep up.
    Try to keep up with one man's hallucinations ?
    I would require a different college degree and
    to be paid by the therapy session.
    DZER

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    • #17
      Bented: I get it that age 60, you don't want to buy more tools, but at age 79 (like me), you will be glad you did. Have a good one.

      Sarge41

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post

        Try to keep up with one man's hallucinations ?
        I would require a different college degree and
        to be paid by the therapy session.
        It was a joke alluding to the never ending heated debate about the inch versus metric measuring systems, some take it very seriously indeed.

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        • #19
          Sometimes I get a bid lot of tools and there are metric micrometers or dial indicators.
          I give them to my buddy who works on Japanese motorcycles and foreign cars.
          He appreciates it and I keep that tainted rubbish out of my shop. LOL LOL LOL

          -Doozer
          DZER

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
            Sometimes I get a bid lot of tools and there are metric micrometers or dial indicators.
            I give them to my buddy who works on Japanese motorcycles and foreign cars.
            He appreciates it and I keep that tainted rubbish out of my shop. LOL LOL LOL

            -Doozer
            Yup, I do the same. Had a buddy at work that's always building rat bikes out of old kawasakis

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            • #21
              Some companies always use dual dimensions which is nice, for example 12.70 +0.025 - 0.00 (.500 +0.001 -0.000).

              Last week I received a drawing that specified a 4 mm key way in a 5/8" bore, this is rare.
              Last edited by Bented; 09-12-2020, 05:34 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                Some companies always use dual dimensions which is nice, for example 12.70 +0.025 - 0.00 (.500 +0.001 -0.000).

                Last week I received a drawing that specified a 4 mm key way in a 5/8" bore, this is rare.
                Last place I worked had a habit of giving internships to engineering students... you should see all the structural steel drawings, and machinery installations etc that were converted from a fraction to a decimal to 4 places. Drove the fab shop (my shop) nuts. When you are dealing with catwalks and chemical piping and pumps in a chemical plant, your main tools are a tape measure, a square, and a level. I've never seen a tape graduated in thousandths.

                What really blew my mind was 4th year students with no idea of drawing conventions and standards, and no idea of fastener call outs.
                I told the boss the university was ripping them off.

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                • #23
                  When I worked at Michelin, we used ISO Fit tolerances, like G7,h6.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #24
                    I used to like phoning the engineer responsible for designing a part, and making the drawing.
                    Asking him or her why why why, always got a convoluted long winded answer as to why.
                    Beaver County Alberta Canada

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by redlee View Post
                      I used to like phoning the engineer responsible for designing a part, and making the drawing.
                      Asking him or her why why why, always got a convoluted long winded answer as to why.
                      I remember when I finally got a proper drawing from the guy. It consisted of a single piece of 2" angle, 30" long. He gave me all 3 views plus a pictorial on E size paper. It was part of a larger project, so the stack of drawings went to around 50 pages like this, with one assembly view.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by redlee View Post
                        I used to like phoning the engineer responsible for designing a part, and making the drawing.
                        Asking him or her why why why, always got a convoluted long winded answer as to why.
                        Just because you CAN draw something does not mean that you SHOULD.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                          Fine and dandy but the BSPP dimensions are in inches, including the threads. What's wrong with SAE? They both need seals. Most heavy machinery used JIC. Now they've created another sealing angle for that. They only did it to control the supply--Make it more proprietary. Hydraulic shops now have to maintain higher inventories. The BSPP is not any better, just different.
                          Maybe it's because the SAE threads came a long time after the BSP threads and offered no advantage. So the suppliers are going back to the global standard rather than keeping on with the parochial local one?

                          Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                          • #28
                            Dunno, everything hydraulic that I've ever done (Cat, David Brown) was either SAE flanges with o-rings (CAT) or NPT (David Brown)

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                            • #29
                              If the planet would come together and decide on one standard for everything life would be a lot simpler.
                              Make all Hyd. fitting the same, make all nuts and bolts metric or inch . Take a look through Mcmaster Carr , Fastenal order books and its mind boggling the variety of fasteners,fittings, couplers,
                              screws and dodads and then look at automotive related stuff.
                              I dont know how many different quick connect air fittings are out there, why?
                              Someone should start a collection of one of everything, any takers?
                              Beaver County Alberta Canada

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