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Timing Belt Drive for Logan 200-210 Opinions

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  • Timing Belt Drive for Logan 200-210 Opinions

    I have a opportunity to get a Logan 200 series (I think) Lathe that is a 40-50's era.It would be a winter project to clean up and possible change over to H series timing belt drive,that would envolve mounting Cog Pulley on Spindle.Any Opinions would be appreciated.

  • #2
    The Logan is a nice little lathe. No idea why you would want one when you have a good lathe that is much heavier, but that's a different issue.

    The most usual belt change is to use a serpentine belt for better grip than the standard leather belt it would have used originally. Mine has a rubber covered canvas type belt. A timing belt certainly would be very positive drive.

    Would you be trying to do all speed change by VFD? The Logan has three countershaft pulley steps, plus back gear, and two motor pulley steps, for a total of 12 speeds over a range of 30 up to about 1500 rpm. You might want to keep that range.

    The pulleys probably involved with the timing belt would be the three-step countershaft and spindle pulleys. The countershaft is simple, the spindle pulley has inner bearings to run on the spindle for back gear, along with the back gear pinion.

    The temptation is to dispense with the three steps and only use one pulley, and I think you could do that OK, but you will want to keep the back gear capability.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      seems like a lot of shop work for little gain? Why the cogged belt?
      There are 1-piece flat belts available by part number, you can run a serpentine belt (from local auto supply) inside out for a smooth flat belt,
      there is several options at far less involved work.
      Help me (us) understand the needed process for the cogged spindle pulley

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
        ...possible change over to H series timing belt drive,that would envolve mounting Cog Pulley on Spindle...
        Horrible idea.

        The drive system must be allowed to slip when overloaded.
        12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
        Index "Super 55" mill
        18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
        7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
        24" State disc sander

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ezduzit View Post

          Horrible idea.

          The drive system must be allowed to slip when overloaded.
          Tell that to the gear-head lathes. Or even a Logan when in slow speed plus back gear.... they just about don't stop.

          The real key is to not overload the machine to start with. Or set up so the tooling breaks first.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            I would argue that a timing belt is a bad idea. A timing belt doesn't slip, so the first crash is more likely to break things. A flat belt can slip and maybe keeping things from breaking.

            A serpentine belt would be a better choice? Do you need more drive power? I am guessing that you have experienced the flat belt slipping? What is the size of the motor? I would guess that a flat belt properly adjusted could transmit 1 HP? There are synthetic flat belts that you could source that would mount on the pulleys that you have.

            Timing pulleys are going to be more expensive than a flat or V pulley.

            J Tiers point about have the full speed range is important. Using a VFD will let you adjust the speed at the expense of torque. You will need the torque available with the lower-speed pulleys.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

              Tell that to the gear-head lathes...
              I would expect there to be a clutch on a gearhead lathe.
              12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
              Index "Super 55" mill
              18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
              7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
              24" State disc sander

              Comment


              • #8
                As JTiers mentioned I don't need a smaller Lathe as I have a 18x60 with 3-1/8" bore and no small tooling.I thought it would be nice to have a smaller Lathe for appropriate jobs.

                The Lathe would be Free from a freind .My idea is to install compact gearbox with High-Low range and Variable Speed Sheaves.I have all components gearbox,new sheaves from Kasto Bandsaw,Cogged pulleys and a selection of 1ph motors.

                A Project for Winter maybe ,are Spindle Bearing readily avaliable.

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                • #9
                  not sure I'd go with the cogged pulleys, at least from the countershaft to the spindle, though I can't see any harm going from motor>gearbox or gearbox>countershaft with them. For countershaft to spindle I'd get a poly V belt and either run it as is or make a new set of countershaft pulleys to match. That should give you plenty of grip but not so much that it won't slip if you crash something.

                  I was worried about that on my Atlas 618 (poly V throughout) but the belts will still slip or the DC controller will overcurrent if something silly happens.

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                  • #10
                    Bearings are avaialble. Decent ones from Logan are not cheap.

                    The VFD wou;d potentially deal with overloads, maybe.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ezduzit View Post

                      I would expect there to be a clutch on a gearhead lathe.
                      Typical smaller gearhead lathes don't have clutch. I have one on my Kerry but the motor stalls before engaged clutch slips. On a hard crash clutch or belt might slip.
                      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ezduzit View Post

                        I would expect there to be a clutch on a gearhead lathe.
                        You know, most lathes up to 16x60 nowadays don't have clutches. The only lathes I've ever seen with clutches were giant American Pacemakers and LeBlonds from the 50's. Modern designs just put shear pins in the feed rods - something crashes, the pin shears and stops any more feed.

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                        • #13
                          I don't think the clutches are designed for that, anyhow. They are just a way that the motor can be kept running but the lathe be stopped. Larger motors have a limited number of starts per hour, so once started, you want to leave it going.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Excluding the larger Spindle Bore of a 12x36 Frejoth geared Head Lathe with 1-1/2 HP, would this Logan perform similar with smaller jobs?

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                            • #15
                              is this it??

                              ​​​​​​http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2093/3377.pdf

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