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Machining a ball on a tilting mill table

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  • Machining a ball on a tilting mill table

    Watching a few vids tonite- one where a guy machined a ball. He first turned the blank to approximate a ball shape, then transferred it to something like a spindex on a mill table. Then he puts a tilt on the table and uses a boring head to spin a tool with the cutter on the inside to swing around the rough shape, while the indexing spindle turns the blank. Interesting way of doing it- but I'm more interested in what kind of milling machine has a tilting table. I've never seen that before. It looks like a regular mill with a dovetail vertical slide for the table casting, but then the table can tilt in it's long direction. I couldn't tell if it had a Y axis or not. I can't return to the video either for some stupid reason, and I wasn't able to snag an image. Anybody shed some light on a machine that can tilt its table?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Deckel FP1?

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    • #3
      Was it this video? https://youtu.be/JmSXo0XdWoA
      The ball gets made 12:00-13:00
      Sure looks like he tilting the table

      Click image for larger version

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      Here's the guy's channel, perhaps there are some details there: https://www.youtube.com/c/mymechanics/featured
      Last edited by DrMike; 09-13-2020, 07:10 AM.

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      • #4
        Yes a Deckel will tilt... nice feature..

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        • #5
          and hes using a swiss bench grinder. made 10 km from where i live.

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          • #6
            I think that some tables on Tom Senior mills have a limited rotation in a vertical plane.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 754 View Post
              Yes a Deckel will tilt... nice feature..
              It sounds like a nice feature but at what sacrifice in strength and stability. I'm not familiar with Deckel mills. Never saw one.
              Does the head also tilt like a BP?? So instead you have to tram the table ? The pivit point in the table has to be the weak link like a drill press table.

              JL...............

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              • #8
                The tilting table on the Swiss made machine I saw years ago was supported on widely spaced locking pivot pionts

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                • #9
                  Here's another from the same guy, a much larger ball by the same method.

                  https://youtu.be/KKiHgBhW8UQ

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                  • #10
                    That's it-

                    I like the machine. I'd have one in my shop. Besides the tilting feature, I like the basic structure where the Y axis is the sliding head and the column carries the table assembly- unlike my round column where the base carries the X-Y table- meaning there's now a base to column interface, plus the base itself to flex. Chances are the sliding head is going to be more rigid and accurate than the Y axis on the typical X-Y table.

                    Ah, but I shouldn't be looking at machines- simply don't have room for another one at this point.
                    Last edited by darryl; 09-13-2020, 03:36 PM.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      I think that they are known as Universal Milling machines. From a google search:

                      The basic difference between a universal horizontal milling machine and a plain horizontal milling machine is the addition of a table swivel housing between the table and the saddle of the universal machine. This permits the table to swing up to 45° in either direction for angular and helical milling operations

                      If you search for the term on http://www.lathes.co.uk/ you will find a lot of machines have that feature.

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

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                      • #12
                        Do you need to tilt the ball orientation to achieve this in a mill?

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                        • #13
                          Either tilt the head or the table. Another easy way is to tilt the Spindex in the vise jaws. Leave the mill squared up.
                          Kansas City area

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                          • #14
                            Yes, you do need the tilt in there somewhere- otherwise the cutter won't get to touch the full surface of the ball.
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                            • #15
                              known as Universal Milling machines.
                              My understanding was that a "Universal Milling machine" allowed the table to rotate on a vertical axis while staying in the same horizontal plane. First time I've seen one in which the table itself tilts rather than rotates.
                              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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