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An interesting way to mill a radius without a rotary table

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  • An interesting way to mill a radius without a rotary table

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTj6...dSomethingCool
    Mike
    WI/IL border, USA

  • #2
    Even though I have a rotary table, this is how I've always cut non-critical radii on the ends of bars, etc. BTW, the rod in the hole doesn't even have to fit very precisely. The better it fits the better the results, but I've done this with rods as small as half the diameter of the hole and they've come out "fine."

    Works with a hole in the end, as illustrated. Can also Crazy-glue a round to the end of the part and use that to "index" if there isn't a hole in the end.

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    • #3
      Something similar, but a little different. For this use SMALL end mill, and long lever, so that you are always stronger than the machine. And do not let go!

      I fully expect the safety "enforcers" to have a field day. Let 'em.

      As long as you can hold the lever and reach the power switch with the other hand, you are good. The lever with the small end mill ensures that the machine does not "take charge". If you want to put a stop bolt in the table, that's fine. It is not so easy with just one slot, so I did not.

      Lever attached to part (bolts that are not visible in the pic) The bolt you DO see is the pivot.


      Slot being cut at arbitrary radius, no rotary table.

      Last edited by J Tiers; 09-14-2020, 03:56 PM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Been using a variation on the belt sander for years.pivot the work piece of a vertical pin mounted to the table
        to create any radius you want. On metal, knock off the corners on the mill first to speed up the process
        Rich
        Green Bay, WI

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        • #5
          Did anyone else seem to lose about 2 pages of posts on this subject? I hope I'm not going crazy,but I swear i was on page 3 when all at once, I lost part of this post. Did this happen to anyone else?
          Sarge41

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
            Did anyone else seem to lose about 2 pages of posts on this subject? I hope I'm not going crazy,but I swear i was on page 3 when all at once, I lost part of this post. Did this happen to anyone else?
            Sarge41
            I'm seeing the same thing. There were lots more posts just a couple of minutes ago. Strange.

            -js
            There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

            Location: SF Bay Area

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            • #7
              It's a different thread altogether fellas

              https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...e-rotary-table

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                It's a different thread altogether fellas

                https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...e-rotary-table
                Right you are. Brain fart here...

                -js
                There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                Location: SF Bay Area

                Comment


                • #9
                  What JT showed is something I've been doing for years. I have a couple of pivot points I made that anchor into a slot wherever I want it. Positioning the table so the endmill can go into the slot lets you machine the full thickness of the part at one time. Usually that's a Y axis adjustment, while the X axis sets the radius. The part needs some kind of handle so you can control it as you manually swing the part around. It's most helpful and much safer if you also set a limit for the rotation of the part. For hogging off material, you probably don't want to climb mill- think about what could most easily happen- a broken end mill, ruined part, and a nasty bruise would be the least of the worries.

                  What is shown in that vid is a decent method- a variation is to clamp the work piece to the upright of an angle plate bolted to the table. That is one favored method of mine. You still use the pin, but it nests into a hole in the plate, and a clamp holds the work piece. Typically the distance from the hole in the plate to the surface of the mill table is enough to accommodate the part in a full 180 degree rotation. The height of vise jaws would only allow this for a much smaller part. Going off the side of the jaws gets around this, as shown, but you have to be more careful, and your vise may not clamp the part well with just one side being under pressure- you might have to back up the other side of the jaws with a spacer.

                  Another way to accomplish this kind of operation is to actually mount the part on a stub and rotate it using a spindex or the like. That's starting to get pretty close to using a rotary table- and is equivalent to using a rotary table set up with a horizontal axis.

                  You do what you can with what you got-
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    That entire operation can be done much more quickly using a bandsaw and belt/disc sander, after scribing it off a radius gage. You don't even need a mill.
                    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                    Index "Super 55" mill
                    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                    24" State disc sander

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