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  • Bizarre Physics


    This is new to me. Do any of you know of other ways to demonstrate the effect.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VPfZ_XzisU
    Jim

  • #2

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    • #3
      There is some physics around that which I don't completely understand, but much of it I do. And it does make sense. Nothing is static- the computer screen you're looking at is going at 1100 mph in one motion, 65000 mph in another, following a precession with the earth, and probably following another precession on a larger scale. Everything that is spinning is subject to relative motions and therefore will react to them. You could power up a flywheel for example, and if it's free to move in all axis, then it will appear to be moving through these axis as time passes. The faster it spins, the more it will resist maintaining equilibrium with its surroundings, and the more forcefully it will try to maintain its own independent motion- and the more we will see it do so. A flywheel not spinning could be seen in one position today, and if nobody disturbs it, it will be seen in that same position at any other time. But it's actually going through all the motions that we all are- one full rotation on a daily basis, one on a yearly basis, one based on the precession of the earth, and several based on larger scale factors. Giving it a spin grants it some independence, which gives rise to the effects we see.

      The spinning nut involves a lot of science, and doesn't break any physical laws. There's no magic- just things we find hard to understand.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4
        I have a rattleback which I made from a scrap of dogwood. I used to make them as gifts for children, No two were exactly alike, but they all reversed. As far as I knew the reversal was caused by imperfections in the contact surface.

        Gyroscopes were always fascinating, wonder if there is a connection between the gyroscopic effect and the flipping wing nuts?
        Jim

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        • #5
          Originally posted by darryl View Post
          There is some physics around that which I don't completely understand, but much of it I do. And it does make sense. Nothing is static- the computer screen you're looking at is going at 1100 mph in one motion, 65000 mph in another, following a precession with the earth, and probably following another precession on a larger scale.
          Kinda like when they say the Space Shuttle is flying at 17,000mph. What? No its not.

          First its falling, not flying. And 17Kmph in ref to what? The moon? No. Oh, the spin of the earth. Well thats cheating. JR

          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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          • #6
            One of the easier things to understand (with some study of course) is the motion of the earth around the sun. Of course, all our gyros on earth are also orbiting the sun- our satellites are too. Our geosynchronous sats are as well, and in order to appear stationary in the sky, they have to be 'flying' ha- in a complex maneuvering pattern to follow the rotating earth, the precession of the earth, the orbiting of the earth around the sun, the motion of the sun through the local area of our galaxy, the motion of our galaxy around the central core (a black hole so they say), and the motion of that black hole through the universe.

            As people moving around on earth, whether standing, sitting, running, or jumping out of a perfectly good airplane, we don't detect any of those motions- but we do see some of the effects. This 'crazy nut' on the space station is just showing that the effects are real.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              I've always wondered, but been too lazy to write anything down as a first order estimate.

              If one sums the velocities of All the relative motions of any earthly body, How fast is that?

              Rotation, precession, Orbits, Solar system movement within the galaxy, galaxy movement around some local center ? Universal expansion? I've left out something. but you get the drift ;-)

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              • #8
                Velocity is a "vector" so ANY talk of velocity or "speed" automatically ASSUMES a 3 dimensional reference. For any thing from sub-surface Earth to the Geosync. satellites the reference would be the Earth and it's gravitational field. SO all this other babbling has absolutely no meaning .
                ...lew...

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                • #9
                  It gets interesting when you consider an inertial frame of reference versus an accelerating frame of reference. An orbiting spacecraft exhibits zero gravity and thus is an inertial frame of reference because the centrifugal force of the orbit's path is counteracted by the acceleration of gravity as a centripetal force (AIUI). IANAP.

                  Velocity of an object is in reference to another frame of reference, and things may get tricky when either one, or both, are accelerating.

                  That's enuf ... I think I sprained my brane...
                  http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                    Velocity is a "vector" so ANY talk of velocity or "speed" automatically ASSUMES a 3 dimensional reference. .......
                    ...lew...
                    Well, maybe not.....velocity can as easily be along a straight line (1D space), or in a line or circle etc in 2D space. Any of those can supply a reference point.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      All of this is why "points of reference" is so important when considering motion.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Where I used to work we would occasionally try to flip a hammer without getting the half twist. Not sure if I ever managed to. BTW, Veritasium is one of my favorite YouTube channels. I think Derek Muller is among the very best science explainers today.

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                        • #13
                          “The spinning nut involves a lot of science, and doesn't break any physical laws. There's no magic- just things we find hard to understand.”

                          This is a fascinating statement.. a full day spent watching C-Span will reveal a goodly number of ‘spinning nuts’ moving with incredible velocity and accomplishing approximately nothing whatsoever. They seem to blithely ignore the massive external forces acting upon them yet consider entropy their sole mission and purpose for existence.

                          as far as what we ‘see’ when observing things in a state of motion the ‘physics’ of our intellectual experience creates value in our interpretation. This is why when you ask 30 people who all watched the identical motion during an identical interval from an identical perspective you will get 30 incorrect yet completely honest interpretations. Without precise measuring equipment it’s all just experience without clear frame of reference. I think Schrodinger best described this effect regarding his most unfortunate (or most fortunate) feline.

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                          • #14
                            I "discovered" this in my youth (1960s) working on carpentry jobs. Kids find all kinds of ways of whiling away time when it is on your hands, and flipping a hammer comes naturally on jobs like that. Like throwing government-issued hand hatchets on timber inventory cruises for the Forest Service. (Well, at least in my experience.)

                            This works with everything I've tried -- tennis racquets (yes), paint brushes, 12-inch rules, even full-length brooms. I've often shown it to friends, to our mutual puzzlement. If I had known the Soviets were going to keep this discovery a secret I surely would have alerted the authorities. Didn't matter, though . . . we won the space race anyway.
                            Last edited by Moxiedad2001; 09-19-2020, 09:17 AM.

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                            • #15
                              After reading about this, and then more recently about the Oumuamua cigar shaped space rock, I got to wondering if the effect didn't probably apply to that as well.
                              John MacArthur

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