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HF vs Eastwood vs Woodward clones of Beverly B1 shear

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  • #31
    I wanted a Beverly B3 but they were scare as hens teeth and if used one happened to show up it wasn't cheap. So.......... I thought I would get one of these bench top shears. How bad could it be?? All I wanted to do was shear some 4" long pieces of 1/8" SS. Before I even got to testing it I found this.................

    It wouldn't set firm on my steel table, it rocked back and forth.I couldn't even clamp it down and wasn't about to strip all the filler and gooey paint off of it to cut and re-weld the feet.

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    The blades were chewing on each other just like my shake rattle and won't roll 3 in 1.

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    This is how out of alignment the upper blade was with the lower.


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    If I tightened up the bolt on the upper blade it ended up 1/8" over the edge of the lower blade.

    This piece of scrap also went back at the distributors expense. It cost them more to take it back than it did to make it. I'm surprised they didn't tell me to just scrap it.

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    JL..........................

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    • #32
      I must have got lucky- I bought a 10 inch benchtop shear, and after rebuilding it, it works great. I did have to shim the fixed blade, but not one problem with it afterwards. My only regret is that I didn't buy the longest one available, as it would have been a little handier. I did go through the same problems- scraping away paint and filler, and I replaced the sloppy linkages and re-fit the pins. I built a little steel table for the left side of it so I had something to carry the material, plus clamp a square to. As I said, my only wish is that it had longer blades.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #33
        You probably got lucky with yours. I thought of doing that but everything was so far off that I would have been further ahead to make one from scratch. When it comes to these chinese things no two are alike.

        JL..............

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        • #34
          Maybe I did just get lucky. I can see that if the main body of the thing doesn't have a decent alignment, it'll never be right. Just out of interest, I'm going to check out KMS tomorrow and see what they have on the shelf. I think their brand is called Magnum. The 10 inch shear I bought was around $120 (Canadian), so the larger one should be under $200- not a bad price if it works properly.

          The shear I bought I mounted on a stand that also carries a piece of rail that I use as an anvil. There's enough weight there that it doesn't move around when I pull the handle. That's been pretty handy, and means I don't have to give up any bench top to mount the shear.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #35
            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
            You probably got lucky with yours.
            Not picking on Joe... but it is luck in some cases. It isn't that China can't make good stuff its that these retailers don't want to pay for it. All this "crap" is build to a price point NOT to a functional standard. These factories (at least the good ones) can sell grades. If you pay for the QC you can get the best off the line. The lowest paying customers get what ever is left over. Some may be good some not so good.
            Mike
            Central Ohio, USA

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post

              Not picking on Joe... but it is luck in some cases. It isn't that China can't make good stuff its that these retailers don't want to pay for it. All this "crap" is build to a price point NOT to a functional standard. These factories (at least the good ones) can sell grades. If you pay for the QC you can get the best off the line. The lowest paying customers get what ever is left over. Some may be good some not so good.
              Your right, they can make really quality products. I have a Yantai rotary table that I've had for 20 plus years. Well made, nicely ground and very accurate.
              Not crazy about the paint but it's average for the era.
              I later bought the matching tail stock. a few years ago or so, not as nicely made as the RT, but it's only a TS.

              JL..................

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              • #37
                Ohio Mike pretty much nails it. It's why I refuse to shop there any more, the retailers and importers are screwing everyone. Oh, how I miss Sears Roebuck.....

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                • #38
                  I checked out the Magnum hand shear today. All the sizes on display, 8 inch through 12 inch, had good fits. I took the liberty of seeing whether they would cut paper or just fold it- each one nipped a corner neatly with no folding, and blade contact was good over the whole range. The 12 inch was $180 CDN, so not scary at all.

                  There was another machine there, called a hand guillotine, which had a longer range, looked to be about 16 or maybe 18 inches. The fit was good on that one as well, but what I didn't like was the curvature on the top blade- it was like a scimitar. That would mean it would need to bend the material being cut quite a bit, so you'd have to put up with the need to flatten every piece that you cut off with it. That can be a PITA. The 3 in 1 is far better in that regard, as is every other shear using the same principle. I looked for a floor model foot powered shear in a 'hobbyist' length, but there was no such thing. Shortest was 52 inch, and over 2 grand. Something like that in say a 30 inch capacity would have me interested-
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #39
                    This is a follow up as I purchased the Eastwood version and have been using it for a couple of weeks. I am fairly pleased with it.

                    Pros: It worked right out of the box. Smooth action, no cleaning or adjustments needed, the sliding surfaces were not painted, and fasteners appear to be blued.. The safety pin on a chain that locks it open or closed is a nice feature and has already kept one visitor to my garage from actuating the cutter. I have cut 22, 20, 18, 16 and 14 gauge mild steel with no issues. Thinner metal leaves a lip where cut, thicker does not. (Reported even in genuine Beaverly units)

                    Neutral: With use the nice blue paint job is slowly getting scratched. There is a bit of play in the handle due to meshing of the gears which I do not notice during use.

                    Cons. Treated with a pungent smelling rust inhibitor.

                    Comparison to Harbor Freight. The unit I received is not a HF version repainted Blue. The manual is not the same as HF. There are more pages, more pictures, and detailed instructions on how to adjust the blades. No safety pin on the HF. I would not be surprised to find out both were made in the same factory from the same castings. It is clear that Eastwood set a different build point for their units, at a higher cost of course.

                    Just missing a sale at Eastwood and not willing to wait for the next, I paid about $90 more than picking one up at the local HF. For me it was worth it.

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