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What size lathe chuck key?

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  • 754
    replied
    Challenger, if you can get a small propane torch, and suitable material , we can waik youbthru hardening the tip of the wrench..

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    If the designer at Cushman had thought that the 25/64" square chuck key was going to cause such wailing and gnashing of teeth in the future, he would have probably chuckled.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Some of the best chuck keys I have, were made out of a piece of old HSS tool bit. Its plenty hard and its already square. All you have to do is put a handle on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 754
    replied
    If you make a soft one go double length, then if it wears trim back..

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    All it has to do is not get torn up by the socket, and not get twisted off by you. That's actually not a hard requirement, since one normally does not use a cheater bar on chuck keys (Unless you are a Russian and in Russia).

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    How tough does the square need to be?

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  • old mart
    replied
    We have to make two for the Atlas 12 x 24, a 10mm one for the 160mm Chinese chuck, and a bigger one for the 5" Taylor chuck which is also going with it. The Taylor looks like it might need a 1/2" square one

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Thanks !
    The reason I hardened the square drive part
    is because the size is so small, and weak.
    A square that small made out of soft steel
    would twist off for sure.

    A side note, I thought you were going to make
    your chuck key. That is why I could not understand
    why the size you measured, that you were asking
    what size it was. So you were looking for a
    NOMINAL SIZE or a TRADE SIZE.
    If you said you were looking to buy a chuck key
    that would have better framed the information you
    were trying to shake out.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I just made a chuck key out of 1144 for an old Union chuck that was .218" square.
    I heat treated and tempered it to 50Rc. I fit it to the chuck. It was a good fit, about
    .001" clearance fit. The square grew a few tenths from hardening, and now it still
    fits, right on the money type fit in this case. A little project, but now I can use
    my chuck.

    -Doozer

    I'd make my own but don't have suitable material or HT experience. Well done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    I just made a chuck key out of 1144 for an old Union chuck that was .218" square.
    I heat treated and tempered it to 50Rc. I fit it to the chuck. It was a good fit, about
    .001" clearance fit. The square grew a few tenths from hardening, and now it still
    fits, right on the money type fit in this case. A little project, but now I can use
    my chuck.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post

    Sure but I bet this 8" 4-jaw is 50-60 years old?
    Yeah, you got me there -- if it really is that old then I got no idea WTF is up with that?

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Much of the US has been metric for quite some time. Particularly, if you want to bid on government contracts then everything must be metric, since 1986. Also, for export reasons.
    Sure but I bet this 8" 4-jaw is 50-60 years old?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bented
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

    And with ball bearings it is not just "present". IIRC They have been quite often in metric dimensions even long time ago.
    Tapered roller bearings then on the other hand in imperial sizes.

    Dimensions probably after the original inventors (SKF Sweden vs. Timken USA)
    Exactly, metric dimension annular ball bearings have been predominant for the last 50 or more years.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Bented View Post

    Welcome to the present, any manufacturer can employ the inch or metric systems as they choose or a mixture of both, a product made in the US does not mean that its dimensions are in inches.
    A majority of annular ball bearings are manufactured in metric dimensions for instance.
    And with ball bearings it is not just "present". IIRC They have been quite often in metric dimensions even long time ago.
    Tapered roller bearings then on the other hand in imperial sizes.

    Dimensions probably after the original inventors (SKF Sweden vs. Timken USA)

    Leave a comment:


  • Bented
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    I was able to see the make of the 4 jaw 8" chuck is Cushman. Why would an American chuck have a metric size?
    Welcome to the present, any manufacturer can employ the inch or metric systems as they choose or a mixture of both, a product made in the US does not mean that its dimensions are in inches.
    A majority of annular ball bearings are manufactured in metric dimensions for instance.

    Leave a comment:

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