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Shopsmith 10ER with bent spindle.

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  • Shopsmith 10ER with bent spindle.

    Picked up a full retirement age Shopsmith recently. Spindle is bent. If I make 3 narrow aluminum vee blocks, If I find the hi spot and press against it do you think a 6" Kurt vise will be able to straighten it? Spindle is .625" and slightly larger in diameter. Shaft is hardened. What do you think?
    Larry on Lake Superior

  • #2
    Hi

    I think it would be unlikely to straighten the shaft. Even discounting the fact it is hardened, you always need a bit of over bend to account for spring back. A Kurt vise won't over bend and the shaft may well take more force than the Kurt can provide without breaking itself.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #3
      It sure will be able to bend past straight with proper placement of the 3 aluminum v-blocks. I think the question is going to be whether the vise can provide enough force to bend the shaft. It probably won't, but maybe you'll get lucky.

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      • #4
        I straightened a drill press spindle acceptably with a small hydraulic press and v blocks but I recut the tapered chuck end to get it running really true afterword. Nothing to lose in trying. If I had invested in a Kurt vice, I would not have risked it by trying to bend metal with it. I'd use large c clamps or something else instead.

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        • #5
          2 vee blocks 6" apart. 1 vee block pressing on high spot. You're probably right about not enough grunt. I'm 75 Years old and couldn't harm a vise without a 4' cheater.
          Gary P.--how big was the press?
          Last edited by ldbent; 09-17-2020, 06:06 PM.
          Larry on Lake Superior

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          • #6
            Vise is probably strong enough, but less control. Press with a back plunger dial indicator, make it an easy job..l easy to find hi spot, easy to see how far you push, easy to check run out. You will need a sharpie. to mark push spot
            I could easily do fork tubes to better that .003 run out, using that method.
            if it is hardened, I sorta doubt that.... it may snap.,

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            • #7
              I would try it with the Kurt vise.
              I also have made some aluminum vee blocks for straightening shafts too.
              Good idea.
              I bet you can make it better, if not perfect.
              3 points over 6" can be a lot of force.

              -Doozer
              DZER

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              • #8
                I worked in a marine machine shop, and propeller shafts were regularly straightened (not by me) with a hydraulic press, v blocks, and a dial indicator - bending a bit over to allow for the spring back, and maybe going through a few times to get it good enough. Too many years ago for me to remember any more details, like size of press, but shafts I think may have been up to 3 or more inches, usually stainless.
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                • #9
                  Last I heard, the Kurt vise was good for something like 5 tons. I would rate this job as a "maybe" and couldn't hurt to try.

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                  • #10
                    As for "hardened", there are degrees of hardness, and if it was too hard, it would already have broken getting to the bend it has.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      make a map of where and how much its bent. you might try peening at the inside corners.

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                      • #12
                        You will loose nothing by trying. I would measure the ammount of bend and record it first. Then try increasing pressures and re measure. Measuring will tell you if any progress is being made. It is likely that a vise won't be sufficient, and without a hydraulic press, the best option might be to talk to a small engineering shop.

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                        • #13
                          I will give it a shot. If it doesn't work I know a guy who works for a Ford dealership.
                          Thanks for the help.
                          Larry on Lake Superior

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                          • #14
                            Depending how bent it is, perhaps using heat to straighten it rather than force? The guy on YouTube who does marine shafts, well known guy, forgot his name. He has a video on this method.
                            He applies heat to the high side which seems like the opposite thing to do, but when it cools, it shrinks more than it expanded to bring it straight. Of course this is on long prop shaft, doubt it would do much good on a short and stubby spindle.
                            Last edited by RB211; 09-18-2020, 12:03 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                              Depending how bent it is, perhaps using heat to straighten it rather than force? The guy on YouTube who does marine shafts, well known guy, forgot his name. He has a video on this method.
                              He applies heat to the high side which seems like the opposite thing to do, but when it cools, it shrinks more than it expanded to bring it straight. Of course this is on long prop shaft, doubt it would do much good on a short and stubby spindle.
                              That would be Keith Fenner, doing marine prop shafts with some expensive grade of SS

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