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Machining should be fun..

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  • #16
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    if everyone had that attitude we would have never been able to put a man on the moon.

    I like tough challenges.... like trying to figure out how to make my snap rings.

    JL......
    ​​​​
    Not sure how to take that , compliment or criticism.

    I quit more than 1 job because of repetition induced boredom, repetion is for robots.
    Beaver County Alberta Canada

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
      I've always enjoyed mating different drives pulleys,sprockets,hydro motors etc. for equipment around the farm&shop that were never designed to be together.I never use drawing and always like making something unique,being sole operator of most everything I design or build I don't have anyone looking over my shoulder.Most times it works out but not always
      And from what I've seen you do an outstanding job. We all make mistakes sometimes and our scrap boxes may show it, but the main thing is you don't give up. Just figure a way out and make it work. That's where the perseverance comes in.

      JL.....................

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      • #18
        Originally posted by redlee View Post

        Not sure how to take that , compliment or criticism.

        I quit more than 1 job because of repetition induced boredom, repetion is for robots.
        Not criticizing...... in todays world repetition is for robots but it wasn't 60 years ago or so.

        JL....................

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
          Not criticizing...... in todays world repetition is for robots but it wasn't 60 years ago or so.

          JL....................
          Yes is was.
          Beaver County Alberta Canada

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          • #20
            Bented's comment about the stages of a machinists career is not far off the mark. When I was going to school to learn this stuff, I was really fired up. Soaked up everything like a sponge. Top in my class. I slowly lost that enthusiasm over the years after doing basically the same stuff over and over again. This was on fully manual machines doing mostly heavy equipment and oil field repairs. I found it hard to keep the "do it right" attitude. The bright spots were when I got to do something different. After 18 years, I made a complete career change. Got out of machine work altogether. Went to work in the power generation industry in the control room of a generating plant.

            After a few years, I found that I actually missed machine work, specifically, the creative part of it. I just like working with my hands and mind. I put in my home welding and machine shop and have been thoroughly enjoying it again. Now I only have to do what I choose to do and that makes all the difference.

            FWIW - One of my machines is a 2 axis CNC mill. I'm still learning the in's and out's of the thing, but find myself gravitating to it every chance I get. The learning is still fun.

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            • #21
              If it makes y'all feel better, it's no different flying a 747 or 777. The only advantage I can see is that I only work half a month, so the other half is playing in the shop.

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              • #22
                Old logger I know use to say "Mite as well be doing something as doing Nothing" Retirements is what being Dead is for"
                learn something each day play some each day eat well and help someone out. It keep you young
                I am 66 still working for a Cat Dealer learning each day, and it finance my Machine and Snow Trac hobbies
                Attached Files

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                • #23
                  I totally understand both sides of this.

                  The stuff I do at work tends to get tedious after a while. The stuff I do at home is not. The work I do is all "inside jobs" meaning that we don't take outside jobs from other companies or people. All the welding and machining I do, is on the company's own equipment, to maintain their stuff. Nobody else's. So yeah after a few years you've seen it all and then things start to repeat. I appreciate a steady paycheck and the opportunity to look like a hero, so it doesn't bother me too much.

                  But at home I'm doing whatever I want, my way. I can be all kinds of creative (or desperate) and stubborn to make something work. I can invent crazy setups or recreate obscure mechanisms. For me that is where the satisfaction is, in making something work. Especially if I can pull it off on a shoestring budget.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    Not criticizing...... in todays world repetition is for robots but it wasn't 60 years ago or so.

                    JL....................
                    It was just as well suited to robots then..only no robots..
                    and people would take jobs to be able to eat... today not so much...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 754 View Post

                      It was just as well suited to robots then..only no robots..
                      and people would take jobs to be able to eat... today not so much...
                      There was these things called "automatic lathes" and "automatic screw machines" among other forms of automation that arose out of the war production effort. The probably had semi-automated mills. Some of them are still in use to this day. After all, the strict dictionary definition of "robot" does not mention any kind of electronics or programming -- those are not necessary to fulfill the definition of what a robot is.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by redlee View Post

                        Yes is was.
                        And even more so!.....
                        1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                        • #27
                          I do not do much manual machine work these days, 80% CNC for the last 10 years and this has been a very good thing indeed. It reduces the tedium of cranking handles and levers all day.

                          I can set up and program multiple machines making different parts and run them at the same time if the cycle times are long enough, you are mostly inspecting the parts as they finish, this is much more efficient and far more fun then running manual machines.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Bented View Post
                            I do not do much manual machine work these days, 80% CNC for the last 10 years and this has been a very good thing indeed. It reduces the tedium of cranking handles and levers all day.

                            I can set up and program multiple machines making different parts and run them at the same time if the cycle times are long enough, you are mostly inspecting the parts as they finish, this is much more efficient and far more fun then running manual machines.
                            No just all that, but also the fact that the machine does not generally dope-off and do something wrong. So consistent good parts are the result. Management loves that. So do the customers that buy the products.
                            1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Go into machine work they said, it'll be fun they said.

                              This afternoon, 3/8-16 pentagonal head bolts that get a ,175" wide X .047" deep groove starting .220" from the bottom of the head.
                              Made a spacer that stopped the head 1/2" from the collet, insert part and close collet.


                              Turn groove.

                              Repeat 200 times (-:
                              Last edited by Bented; 09-25-2020, 05:54 PM.

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                              • #30
                                What uses a pentagon head ? Don't believe I have seen one.. not much choice of wrenches or sockets I bet..
                                likely fits in a pocket., ?

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