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Recently acquired Atlas 10100 lathe

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  • Recently acquired Atlas 10100 lathe

    Hey there, first post here! I posted on another forum but I wasnt sure which one has more eyes on it, so I figured it wouldnt hurt to post here too! I kind of just inherited a NOS Atlas 10100 lathe and Id like to get it in working order.

    I know I need a motor for it(i believe 1/3 HP is needed), but am wondering what else is missing.

    -Will any old 1/3HP motor work? I have the belt already new in packaging.
    -I know im missing some other parts for it, but can anyone help me figure out what else is needed to get this going?

    Thanks all!!

  • #2
    Looks like that is new old stock, nice find. You have everything there to start making chips, but you'll need a Jacobs chuck with an MT1 arbor for the tailstock to be able to drill.

    Comment


    • #3
      Fill the headstock around the spindle bearing with epoxy grout.
      They will crack there and flex a lot, causing chatter.
      You are almost better with a 7X10 China lathe.
      There are 3 versions of that headstock.
      Hopefully you got the iron one, not the zamak one.

      -Doozer.
      Last edited by Doozer; 09-22-2020, 11:52 PM.
      DZER

      Comment


      • #4
        You'll want a single phase 1750RPM motor. Preferably reversible.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • #5
          An Atlas Manual of Lathe Operations will be a good thing to have. I don't see a 3 jaw scroll chuck, so to use the 4 jaw independent chuck you will need a dial indicator and magnetic base so you can accurately center your work in the chuck. A small bench grinder would be needed eventually to sharpen the HSS tool bits, for this lathe I would stay away from carbide tool bits. And ask a lot of questions, don't be put off from some of the more derogatory responses that are bound to happen.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Stu View Post
            ... I would stay away from carbide tool bits. ..
            Well, for a beginner, sometimes there is an advantage to use insert carbide tooling.
            Point being, that if the cutting edge gets toasted or broken, it is just as simple as
            rotating or changing an insert. Grinding your own is awesome, but just another
            variable to get right, that could just lead to frustration if you don't master the
            technique right out of the gate. With insert carbide, you are sharp and off and running
            right out of the box.
            They sell those 5 piece 1/4" inscribed circle triangle lathe toolbit kits that are OK.
            They are screw on inserts, and good for light work that a small lathe would do.
            And they are positive rake for easy cutting. Might be a good first option.

            ---Doozer
            DZER

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking at the pics, he already has 6 pre-ground bits (3/16) so that's a good thing.
              I would say basically all you need is the motor and a pulley for it. Hopefully a reversible motor.
              Something like this: https://www.surpluscenter.com/Electr...se-10-2779.axd

              You'll probably also want a drill chuck on an arbor for the tail stock, as already mentioned.
              BTW welcome aboard, that is one nice-looking machine!

              Comment


              • #8
                I see a set of change gears, but it would be a good idea to show us a photo of what's under the back cover where those gears go, in case there is some other critical part missing.

                A dial indicator is not required to use a 4 jaw independent chuck, except for the most accurate centering. You can center things as well as they would typically be centered in a 3 jaw without one, although it does take a bit of patience and practice. "Eyeball" the distance from the end of the tool bit to the work with each of the 4 jaws closest to you, in turn. Adjust so that at each position the tool bit tip just touches.

                You will likely want a dial indicator anyway at some point, but I would not run out and buy one thinking that you can't make any chips until you have it.
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                  I see a set of change gears, but it would be a good idea to show us a photo of what's under the back cover where those gears go, in case there is some other critical part missing.

                  A dial indicator is not required to use a 4 jaw independent chuck, except for the most accurate centering. You can center things as well as they would typically be centered in a 3 jaw without one, although it does take a bit of patience and practice. "Eyeball" the distance from the end of the tool bit to the work with each of the 4 jaws closest to you, in turn. Adjust so that at each position the tool bit tip just touches.

                  You will likely want a dial indicator anyway at some point, but I would not run out and buy one thinking that you can't make any chips until you have it.
                  Hey there, here is a pic under the back cover. Do I have an extra set of gears? or could these be different gears to be swapped out for certain purposes? Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                    Looking at the pics, he already has 6 pre-ground bits (3/16) so that's a good thing.
                    I would say basically all you need is the motor and a pulley for it. Hopefully a reversible motor.
                    Something like this: https://www.surpluscenter.com/Electr...se-10-2779.axd

                    You'll probably also want a drill chuck on an arbor for the tail stock, as already mentioned.
                    BTW welcome aboard, that is one nice-looking machine!
                    Hey thanks! If you see my picture just above this post, is that the pulley on the left that you mention I need? And are there any less expensive motors available? I dont think im going to make a hobby out of this yet, but just an occasional "fix" for bike parts or whatever things I need in life It sounds like the motor I need is a very specific type; not just any plain old motor will work. How do I make sure I dont buy the wrong one? Also same goes for the drill chuck but if I already have a hefty drill press, do I need the drill chuck for my lathe? Sorry for my ignorance but I am a total machining noob and not sure what everything does yet.

                    Thanks again!

                    PS also attached a couple pics of tools I found for it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

                      Hey thanks! If you see my picture just above this post, is that the pulley on the left that you mention I need? And are there any less expensive motors available? I dont think im going to make a hobby out of this yet, but just an occasional "fix" for bike parts or whatever things I need in life It sounds like the motor I need is a very specific type; not just any plain old motor will work. How do I make sure I dont buy the wrong one? Also same goes for the drill chuck but if I already have a hefty drill press, do I need the drill chuck for my lathe? Sorry for my ignorance but I am a total machining noob and not sure what everything does yet.

                      Thanks again!

                      PS also attached a couple pics of tools I found for it.
                      Pretty much any "plain ol" 1750 rpm motor will do. You can do without reversing, but it is handy. I'd not try cutting in reverse, the chuck can unscrew unexpectedly, so just use it to reverse back when threading if needed.

                      I get them from garage sales.... $10 at most, if it spins free and does not smell burnt, it is generally good. The 1750 rpm in 1/4 to 1/3 HP is very very common.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                        Fill the headstock around the spindle bearing with epoxy grout.
                        They will crack there and flex a lot, causing chatter.
                        You are almost better with a 7X10 China lathe.
                        There are 3 versions of that headstock.
                        Hopefully you got the iron one, not the zamak one.

                        -Doozer.
                        I checked and the headstock is magnetic, so I assume its iron?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                          Also same goes for the drill chuck but if I already have a hefty drill press, do I need the drill chuck for my lathe?
                          Yes.

                          I see a lantern base, but no tool holders.
                          They will look like these:
                          https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...4dUDCAY&uact=5
                          Location: North Central Texas

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                            Pretty much any "plain ol" 1750 rpm motor will do. You can do without reversing, but it is handy. I'd not try cutting in reverse, the chuck can unscrew unexpectedly, so just use it to reverse back when threading if needed.

                            I get them from garage sales.... $10 at most, if it spins free and does not smell burnt, it is generally good. The 1750 rpm in 1/4 to 1/3 HP is very very common.
                            Oh great, I was told in another post that the motor I need is a: "1/3 HP motor should have a 5/8" diameter output shaft as that is the bore of the supplied pulley. It should have a 4-bolt (with slotted holes) mounting foot on the side (you do not want a 56C frame). And should take a 1/4" square key. Which taken all together makes the motor a 56-Frame."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Joel View Post
                              Yes.

                              I see a lantern base, but no tool holders.
                              They will look like these:
                              https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...4dUDCAY&uact=5
                              Hm what are the tool holders used for? Are they required? Im not going to be using this often at all. Maybe a couple times a year for now, so im just trying to get the necessary things for now.

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