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Recently acquired Atlas 10100 lathe

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  • #16
    You can use whatever motor you can find, but it probably won't have reversing. Not a big deal, its the reversing that makes them expensive, If you can find an old pump motor at a yard sale or on craiglist, or something like that it'll work.
    As far as the pulley goes, I'm not sure if your lathe has a countershaft setup or not?
    Somebody else will have to answer that one.

    It's doubtful that the chuck on your drill press would fit, but it doesn't hurt to try -- might get lucky. Like Stu said, you'll need a MT-1 arbor on it -- might be OK on a smaller drill press. You'll just have to pull the chuck and arbor off your press and find out.

    Far as the tool holders go, you can use the lathe without them, but it may require grinding your tools a bit differently. I did that for a while on my South Bend. Basically you make or stack up a bunch of washers around the round post, and the screw bears down directly on top of the tool bit.

    In case you don't have it already, here is a download link for a PDF file of the Atlas lathe manual, they do a great job of explaining the basics: https://coffeeshopmath.files.wordpre...ts-tables1.pdf
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 09-23-2020, 03:02 PM.

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    • #17
      I would be interested to find out if the chuck has a name on it, as the box says Made in England. If you only have one chuck, the four jaw independent is by far the best, it just takes some time to learn how to use. As already mentioned, an indicator helps to get work running true in one of these chucks, but is not absolutely vital. One method is to have the tip of the lathe tool close and watch the eccencitricity of the work as you turn the chuck by hand. Your headstock would most likely be the prefered cast iron, the magnet should work on any part of it equally.
      Last edited by old mart; 09-23-2020, 03:17 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
        You can use whatever motor you can find, but it probably won't have reversing. Not a big deal, its the reversing that makes them expensive, If you can find an old pump motor at a yard sale or on craiglist, or something like that it'll work.
        As far as the pulley goes, I'm not sure if your lathe has a countershaft setup or not?
        Somebody else will have to answer that one.

        It's doubtful that the chuck on your drill press would fit, but it doesn't hurt to try -- might get lucky. Like Stu said, you'll need a MT-1 arbor on it -- might be OK on a smaller drill press. You'll just have to pull the chuck and arbor off your press and find out.

        Far as the tool holders go, you can use the lathe without them, but it may require grinding your tools a bit differently. I did that for a while on my South Bend. Basically you make or stack up a bunch of washers around the round post, and the screw bears down directly on top of the tool bit.

        In case you don't have it already, here is a download link for a PDF file of the Atlas lathe manual, they do a great job of explaining the basics: https://coffeeshopmath.files.wordpre...ts-tables1.pdf
        Man, this is much more complex than I thought it was going to be heh. But maybe im just overthinking it/need to figure out all the terminology and then itll start making sense. I was asking about my drill press more because, couldnt i just used the drill press for the machining? Instead of using the lathe with the drill chuck.

        In case I get overwhelmed and scrap this idea of getting this setup. Whats all this worth?

        Thanks!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

          Man, this is much more complex than I thought it was going to be heh. But maybe im just overthinking it/need to figure out all the terminology and then itll start making sense. I was asking about my drill press more because, couldnt i just used the drill press for the machining? Instead of using the lathe with the drill chuck.

          In case I get overwhelmed and scrap this idea of getting this setup. Whats all this worth?

          Thanks!
          Yep, probably overthinking, combined with information overload. Machining is a wide topic and there's loads of info out there. It's generally not a good idea to use a drill press for machining, because that puts a side load on the spindle and chuck -- something they weren't designed for. It usually leads to the chuck falling off while its running.

          If I was you, I would just slow down and read the Atlas manual a few times, trying to visualize everything. And just keep asking questions. Learning the terminology and the relevant standards is the biggie, once you get that the rest of it follows easily enough.

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          • #20
            The reason you want a drill chuck for the lathe is so that you can drill a hole dead center in the end of a shaft - the work in the lathe chuck rotates, the drill bit does not rotate but simply advances axially into the work in the lathe chuck. This is actually something you do more often than you might think. Sometimes you want a "center" hole in the end of a shaft, which will later be supported by a "dead center" in the tailstock in place of the drill chuck, sometimes you may just want a hole that you will later enlarge to a precise size with the lathe tools. Drilled holes are not very precise, as a general rule. The tailstock drill chuck is something else you can do without to start with, but you'll likely want one sooner than you need a dial indicator.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #21
              About those gears - no, not an extra set. You use them in different combinations so that the cutting tool advances along the work at different rates relative to how quickly it rotates. This allows you to cut threads of different pitches, and take finer or coarser cuts in other cases.
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #22
                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                You'll want a single phase 1750RPM motor. Preferably reversible.
                Or a dc industrial sewing machine motor. Variable speed is nice.

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                • #23
                  What is your location? I have many motors and that's why your profile should have a location.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

                    I checked and the headstock is magnetic, so I assume its iron?
                    You are lucky to have the later model.
                    A good one indeed. Sweet.

                    -Doozer
                    DZER

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      If I was you, I would just slow down and read the Atlas manual a few times, trying to visualize everything.
                      Then find a copy of South Bend's 'How To Run A Lathe" (available online in .pfd). Read it carefully and decide if this is really something you are interested in pursuing. If it is, you will be spending money very soon (accessories and specialized tools are required to do almost everything) and be prepared to face a fairly steep learning curve.
                      Many here will be happy to help you get started, but please decide what your intention and needs are and let us know, so we can be specific with assistance.

                      Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                      Man, this is much more complex than I thought it was going to be heh.
                      ...In case I get overwhelmed and scrap this idea of getting this setup. Whats all this worth?
                      As for value (there is no selling here), look on ebay and cragslist. Location is important with machinery values, so try to compare with machines from the same region.
                      Location: North Central Texas

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Joel View Post
                        Then find a copy of South Bend's 'How To Run A Lathe" (available online in .pfd). Read it carefully and decide if this is really something you are interested in pursuing. If it is, you will be spending money very soon (accessories and specialized tools are required to do almost everything) and be prepared to face a fairly steep learning curve.
                        Many here will be happy to help you get started, but please decide what your intention and needs are and let us know, so we can be specific with assistance.
                        I gave him the link to the Atlas manual in pdf form in post #16, -- might be more useful to him than the SB book. I have both and its a good combination.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by challenger View Post
                          What is your location? I have many motors and that's why your profile should have a location.
                          Good point. I just added it. We just moved to Connecticut(near New Haven) but am in Boston every other week for my wifes chemo and NY just as much these days as my mom just had a heart transplant(Crazy!) and I've been trying to visit her in the hospital as much as possible. In case im not local to you, id love to buy one of your motors and gladly pay for shipping. Thanks!

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                          • #28
                            Thanks all! This place is great! I definitely need to snuggle up with the manual.. Does anyone have any recommendations for what to use to clean, oil and grease with? I figured I could at least do that while I wait to find a motor and power this thing up.

                            A drill chuck definitely sounds useful now. How does this look: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Jacobs-1-2-...cAAOSwbW9fRXky
                            Last edited by fmradio516; 09-23-2020, 09:22 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Joel View Post
                              Then find a copy of South Bend's 'How To Run A Lathe" (available online in .pfd). Read it carefully and decide if this is really something you are interested in pursuing. If it is, you will be spending money very soon (accessories and specialized tools are required to do almost everything) and be prepared to face a fairly steep learning curve.
                              Many here will be happy to help you get started, but please decide what your intention and needs are and let us know, so we can be specific with assistance.
                              Honestly, I am really a plain old boring guy and have no experience machining, but could have definitely benefitted from having a lathe a few times in the past modifying bicycle parts. I just plain think lathes are a cool, elegant piece of machinery. I just dont know if and what I would use a lathe for enough to call it a hobby besides the occasional fix. But maybe its because I dont know what its capable of. I also realized I would feel bad getting rid of it, as it was her grandfathers and her dad just gave it to me.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                                But maybe its because I dont know what its capable of. I also realized I would feel bad getting rid of it, as it was her grandfathers and her dad just gave it to me.
                                Probably better to hang onto it then lathes can make most bike parts and all kinds of custom stuff... I used to really be into the 2-wheel scene back in college LOL that was about 30 yrs ago but yeah I used to drool over the custom-made parts...

                                That drill chuck looks ideal from where I'm sitting. Let's see what other say first.

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