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Recently acquired Atlas 10100 lathe

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  • #31
    Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

    Oh great, I was told in another post that the motor I need is a: "1/3 HP motor should have a 5/8" diameter output shaft as that is the bore of the supplied pulley. It should have a 4-bolt (with slotted holes) mounting foot on the side (you do not want a 56C frame). And should take a 1/4" square key. Which taken all together makes the motor a 56-Frame."
    Well, some things are "ideal" and others are hard needs. I would reckon you could find a pulley to run it , with a hole for whatever motor you find. Older hardware stores carry them (not the big box places, they do not even sell belts). Might not be ideal, but would run the machine. Then, you can bore a better pulley to the size you need, or just use what you have until you find the ideal motor. I'd NOT bore out the original pulley, no need to, and if you did, it would not fit your ideal motor anymore..

    Dealing with pulley holes is a fairly simple thing that is a way to break into using the machine. I very good approach to machining is to adopt the "Jim Williams approach"... whatever needs doing, you do it if it is possible with the facilities you have. You do not rely on buying exactly what you need.

    That will get you the maximum exposure to doing different things, and give the confidence to do other things that you have not done before.

    McMaster-Carr sells to whoever (in the USA), and has just about anything you want. Not the cheapest, but also not the most expensive.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #32
      Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

      Oh great, I was told in another post that the motor I need is a: "1/3 HP motor should have a 5/8" diameter output shaft as that is the bore of the supplied pulley. It should have a 4-bolt (with slotted holes) mounting foot on the side (you do not want a 56C frame). And should take a 1/4" square key. Which taken all together makes the motor a 56-Frame."
      Keep a eye out for Farm Duty Motor,there usually always reversable and can also be called TEFC ( totally enclosed fan cooled ) they are also 5/8" shaft most of the time and 56 frame.

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      • #33
        Would this motor work for me? Kinda local to me: https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/tl...188929742.html

        Also saw this one: https://boston.craigslist.org/sob/tl...183471117.html
        Last edited by fmradio516; 09-24-2020, 07:29 AM.

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        • #34
          Both are fine but the second one is 3 phase - just what I have on my Myford ML7. IMO this is the ideal setup but you will have get a VFD which gives you the ability to vary the rpm.

          Geoff

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          • #35
            Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
            Would this motor work for me? Kinda local to me: https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/tl...188929742.html
            I would go for the first one, just to keep things simple. It's basically ideal, the ratings are pretty close to the original.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by ammcoman2 View Post
              Both are fine but the second one is 3 phase - just what I have on my Myford ML7. IMO this is the ideal setup but you will have get a VFD which gives you the ability to vary the rpm.

              Geoff
              Best to keep it simple for a beginner. 110v wall plug is a lot more appealing than 220v with a VFD. I vote the first, although it isn't much of a deal.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #37
                There are 120V in, 230V out VFDs.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #38
                  I just realized what the tool holders do.. Seems like those are pretty necessary to do anything. How would I attach these bits I have to the lathe? Because I dont think I have any tool holders.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                    I just realized what the tool holders do.. Seems like those are pretty necessary to do anything. How would I attach these bits I have to the lathe? Because I dont think I have any tool holders.
                    You actually can use the lathe without the tool holders. I had a setup like that when I first started. The trick is to get some flat washers that just fit over the tool post, and put the tool bit at the correct height. When you tighten the screw on top of the tool post, it pushes the tool bit down against the washers, holding both in place. I'll try to get a pic later that might explain it better. Its a bit of a hack but it works in a pinch.

                    Those "Armstrong" tool holders that your lathe uses are largely obsolete, but you can get them cheap on eBay.
                    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 09-25-2020, 11:38 AM.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      There are 120V in, 230V out VFDs.
                      Sure. But I'm still going by KISS. Yeah those of us that have been doing this for years know about three phase power and setting up a VFD an all that. But OP isn't even sure he wants to keep it. Thus, best to keep his time and money investment low.
                      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                      • #41
                        You actually can use the lathe without the tool holders.
                        BUT! With or without tool holders, you need to understand about the clearance, rake, etc angles on the tool relative to the work, or you will be frustrated and unhappy. These will differ depending on whether you are using a tool holder or not. Do read up on this before you start trying to cut anything.
                        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                        • #42
                          Cutting is likely not the problem. The tools are so small that there is no good way to hold them without an Armstrong type holder, in a lantern post. With a block type post, sure, probably could be done.

                          As for the VFD, the OP brought it up. It's an option, and yes, it is an extra complication that the OP can decide about. Putting a motor on a lathe is usually not a traumatic issue, though........
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Okay I think this project is quickly going on hold. More of a learning curve than I expected, but I understand.. its an art. Have got a lot going on right now with my wife and my mom.. I might just clean it up as best as I can and store it for now.

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                            • #44
                              I am sorry for your families health concerns, I hope things get BETTER. While I have years using lathes, I am still just a hobbyist. I found an Atlas lathe in Craigslist and got it for $300.00. I am into this for more that $3,000 and still just a hobbyist. I would encourage you to watch 1 MACHINE SHOP TIPS tubalcain playlist #1 thru ... - YouTube
                              Watch all you can, he has lots to learn from. There are many Atlas lathes, he may not use your lathe but you will learn a head full. Take it slow and decide if this is something that will work for you. Sharpening can drive you crazy, steel selection is an other concern, finding ISO 68 oil can be done, just learning to center material in a 4 jaw chuck is frustrating, learn to use a lantern holder and a tool holder is a start, messing with washers is NOT what you will see on videos and will cause you more grinding/sharpening angles problems. If you think finding a motor is a problem, life will be harder trying to learn to make chips. You might want to join [email protected] , lots of good help on this site. Make good decisions, life is getting shorter for us all.
                              Last edited by dbq49er; 09-25-2020, 04:46 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by dbq49er View Post
                                I am sorry for your families health concerns, I hope things get BETTER. While I have years using lathes, I am still just a hobbyist. I found an Atlas lathe in Craigslist and got it for $300.00. I am into this for more that $3,000 and still just a hobbyist. I would encourage you to watch 1 MACHINE SHOP TIPS tubalcain playlist #1 thru ... - YouTube
                                Watch all you can, he has lots to learn from. There are many Atlas lathes, he may not use your lathe but you will learn a head full. Take it slow and decide if this is something that will work for you. Sharpening can drive you crazy, steel selection is an other concern, finding ISO 68 oil can be done, just learning to center material in a 4 jaw chuck is frustrating, learn to use a lantern holder and a tool holder is a start, messing with washers is NOT what you will see on videos and will cause you more grinding/sharpening angles problems. If you think finding a motor is a problem, life will be harder trying to learn to make chips. You might want to join [email protected] , lots of good help on this site. Make good decisions, life is getting shorter for us all.
                                Thanks very much. In the workshop today I found in a drawer an Armstrong 1010L tool holder mixed in with a bunch of metal punches. So that was cool! But yeah, im not looking to spend thousands on this. I just thought if I had everything besides the motor to get it going, id turn some stuff every now and then. I guess this will go to ebay!

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