Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Recently acquired Atlas 10100 lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post

    Thanks very much. In the workshop today I found in a drawer an Armstrong 1010L tool holder mixed in with a bunch of metal punches. So that was cool! But yeah, im not looking to spend thousands on this. I just thought if I had everything besides the motor to get it going, id turn some stuff every now and then. I guess this will go to ebay!
    Well, the motor should not be expensive, and you have a tool holder, so you should be able to mount the lot to a piece of plywood and have at it. You will not come close to "thousands" getting it running.

    Since you are not needing to get it going right away, you can find a motor as and when you can, and find some form of grinder (for sharpening toolbits) on the same schedule. It need not cost more than literally $50 to get it turning metal. I find motors for $5 at garage sales. Small but workable grinders I have bought for $20. Plywood is not expensive if you don't buy a whole sheet. I think the $50 is possible including belt and pulley.

    If you have any use for it, then I'd not advise sending it off via ebay unless you have to.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #47
      I used ConSew commercial sewing machine motors on small lathes like this eBay item number: 151695455948 They work great & are made for all day use, have reverse, variable speed, brake if you want, are DC so have lots of low end power. This one ships free & cost $125 new. What's not to like?

      Comment


      • #48
        J Tiers lets be honest here. fmradio516 does not know what he does NOT know. Just mounting his lathe to a piece of plywood should mean gluing up two or three layers of 3/4" plywood to make a stable base and then mounted to a solid stand so that vibration in the lathe does not occur. fmradio516 is still trying to figure out what he owns and if it has all the running parts to make it work. Now tail stock MT1 drill chuck, center drills , solid carbide centers, ball bearing centers, face plates, stable bearings timken or babbit RUN OUT, his ability to change speeds for his needs. The list can get long. He will not know until he gets a motor on it and maybe a link belt ($28.00). We know nothing about his lead screw and it's ability to move the apron. He will need to find the model number and a serial number to get the info for greater knowledge and maybe parts. Robert at [email protected] can be a great source of info and use the files offered by the group. BEST of wishes for the newbie.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by dbq49er View Post
          J Tiers lets be honest here. fmradio516 does not know what he does NOT know. Just mounting his lathe to a piece of plywood should mean gluing up two or three layers of 3/4" plywood to make a stable base and then mounted to a solid stand so that vibration in the lathe does not occur. fmradio516 is still trying to figure out what he owns and if it has all the running parts to make it work. Now tail stock MT1 drill chuck, center drills , solid carbide centers, ball bearing centers, face plates, stable bearings timken or babbit RUN OUT, his ability to change speeds for his needs. The list can get long. He will not know until he gets a motor on it and maybe a link belt ($28.00). We know nothing about his lead screw and it's ability to move the apron. He will need to find the model number and a serial number to get the info for greater knowledge and maybe parts. Robert at [email protected] can be a great source of info and use the files offered by the group. BEST of wishes for the newbie.
          Sounds like you are recommending knitting and Mah-jong as an alternative.

          Perhaps you were born knowing everything you needed to know, most of us were not and had something of the same journey.

          A small sheet of 3/8" ply is all I mounted my POS AA/109 lathe to, and it was up to me to get and make everything else. I had no idea really what I had got into, but I made a tailstock chuck stem, and got it going. Best thing I ever did, taught me a LOT.

          That's a better machine, shame to throw it away for lack of knowledge..
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #50
            yeah, it's tricky at the beginning when you don't even know what you don't know. Best bet is to get a motor of some sort, buy some plastic and just start cutting. You'll soon be discovering a lot of stuff you don't know and then you ask as many questions as you want. Having a lathe is very enabling, even for humdrum stuff. I was replacing the brakes on a friends car the other week when he mentioned that his windscreen fluid hose was broken. 10min, some delrin and a piece of hose later I have a couple of plastic barbs and replaced the broken section. I can't imagine not having the tools I have.

            Comment


            • #51
              Yeah If I had someone local to me who knew about this stuff, it would help a ton. But I dont know anyone where I live, so it makes things tough.

              Any suggestions for cleaning and greasing this thing before storage? It collected dust for the couple years the box was opened.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                Yeah If I had someone local to me who knew about this stuff, it would help a ton. But I dont know anyone where I live, so it makes things tough.

                Any suggestions for cleaning and greasing this thing before storage? It collected dust for the couple years the box was opened.
                Hmm, I was hoping you'd want to try and use it. As for cleaning, a can of WD-40 and an old toothbrush works good. Grease to protect it in storage? Pretty much anything will do, even vaseline.

                Being you're in CT I'm willing to bet there is someone in your area, after all CT was once the heart of American manufacturing (in the early 1800's) , and a good lot of toolmaking still goes on there. You could try asking at your local community college or university in the engineering dept. -- they will very likely know a few people among the local manufacturers in your area.

                Comment


                • #53
                  There may be a local club who have the expertese to help, maybe your nearest library would know.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    A very good idea is to find some shop class texts, which I have found at garage sales, etc. They will have a good description of the typical controls, and how to use the machine, how the controls work, and often examples of setups that you can refer to.

                    I had the books before the machines, and as a result, I was able to research and find out how to run whatever my next target machine to buy was. I knew in general how to use it and set it up before I ever found one. That helped in determining which ones were good, and which had problems.

                    You already have a lathe, putting you ahead of many. So you just need references.

                    Atlas had a book on using a lathe, and Southbend had a similar book "How to run a lathe". Those two are good, and will apply better to your machine than a shop text that may refer to larger industrial machines.

                    Since you will have some time, if you can find one or two of the above, you should be able to get a good grounding in how it works and how to use it before you actually do use it. That would be a great advantage to you.
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 09-27-2020, 09:42 PM.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Thanks all. That makes sense..

                      So if I stumble upon a motor that fits. What else do I need? If I already have one tool holder, and then I believe the pulley is already attached to the Atlas on the left of the picture in post #9. There is also a new belt in packaging. Shouldnt this be all i need?

                      Can it be run on the wood frame it shipped on or does it really need to be mounted to something more sturdy?

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Would this motor work? https://boston.craigslist.org/nos/tl...202449406.html

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                          That Motor would be fine.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                            ...(snip)...

                            Any suggestions for cleaning and greasing this thing before storage? It collected dust for the couple years the box was opened.
                            There's a product called LPS 3 that provides good protection. It sprays on wet then drys to a waxy film. For long term storage you'd probably want to then use an outer covering over that, to prevent dust collecting.

                            https://www.google.com/search?client...-b-1-d&q=lps+3
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by lynnl View Post

                              There's a product called LPS 3 that provides good protection. It sprays on wet then drys to a waxy film. For long term storage you'd probably want to then use an outer covering over that, to prevent dust collecting.

                              https://www.google.com/search?client...-b-1-d&q=lps+3
                              Well I guess my Grandfather in law knew what he was doing... found these in the basement. Probably from the 80s..

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by fmradio516 View Post
                                Thanks all. That makes sense..

                                So if I stumble upon a motor that fits. What else do I need? If I already have one tool holder, and then I believe the pulley is already attached to the Atlas on the left of the picture in post #9. There is also a new belt in packaging. Shouldnt this be all i need?

                                Can it be run on the wood frame it shipped on or does it really need to be mounted to something more sturdy?
                                That would be good enough to get started anyway. That's pretty much what I did. But pretty soon I was making tools for the lathe, and all kinds of upgrades as time and money allowed.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X