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Craftsman 919.168700 Compressor Capacitor Wiring?

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  • Craftsman 919.168700 Compressor Capacitor Wiring?

    My across-the-street neighbor has a Craftsman air compressor that he is trying to repair. Unfortunately, he disconnected the two capacitors in it, apparently to test them, and he lost the wire connection drawing which he made. So he has five wires with quick disconnects and two capacitors with five fingers on four terminals (one terminal has two). Every way he tries to connect them, including one suggestion from me, the 15 Amp circuit breaker pops after it runs for about 15 or 25 seconds. The compressor is rated at 15 Amps. so, yes it is close. He has tried it on at least two different circuits. I am going to see if I can test the capacitors tomorrow, but it would be nice to know exactly how the wires were supposed to be connected. We tried some good guesses like the start capacitor should connect to the centrifugal switch and the two black wires are perhaps intended to go to that terminal with two fingers. But nothing seems to work. The fact that it runs in a more or less normal manner for about 20 seconds seems to tell us that the motor itself is OK. And it does not seem to have an excessive mechanical drag: I can turn the motor easily by hand.

    I can find the owner's manual, but it does not have a schematic or wiring diagram. Here are some photos:

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    The third and fourth photos show how he had the capacitors hooked up. In the third photo you can see the centrifugal switch with a red and black wire on it. The top capacitor is the same one in both photos and seems to be marked 45 uF. Is that the start capacitor? And the bottom one is marked 400-480 uF. Is that the run capacitor? He has the centrifugal switch connected to both capacitors: that does not seem correct to me. It is a little hard to see in the third photo, but the bottom terminal of the 45 uF capacitor has a two finger connection. It has a black and a brown wire connected to it in the photo.

    I tried to switch the brown wire to the 400 uF capacitor and the black wire on that capacitor to the double terminal on the 45 uF to have the two black wires connected together. It still ran and it still popped the breaker in 20 seconds or so.

    The one thing that we did not try was to connect it to a 20 Amp circuit. I have that in my garage and will suggest that we roll it across the street tomorrow for that test.

    I can not find a wiring/pictorial/schematic diagram for this compressor. Does anyone have one and can post a photo of the capacitor connections? Or any other suggestions would be appreciated. Otherwise this baby is headed to the trash heap. That sounds like a shame.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

  • #2
    One is a start cap., one isn't.
    Give you a hint, it's the yellow label.

    Comment


    • #3
      Two brown wires?
      run cap

      Comment


      • #4
        I suspected the larger capacitor was the start.

        There are two red wires, two black wires, and one brown. Perhaps I was not clear.



        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
        Two brown wires?
        run cap
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        Make it fit.
        You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

        Comment


        • #5
          What was the original problem? What was he trying to fix? Might give a hint to the current problem.
          Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
          Specialty products for beating dead horses.

          Comment


          • #6
            Somewhere on the web there was a site listing that translated the Sears Model numbers into the original builder of the equipment.
            Then you could search for a wiring diagram under that name.

            Found It: http://vintagemachinery.org/Craftsma...facturers.aspx

            919 is Ingersoll Rand
            Last edited by Greg_B; 09-25-2020, 08:16 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
              I suspected the larger capacitor was the start.

              There are two red wires, two black wires, and one brown. Perhaps I was not clear.
              You could be color-blind for all I know.

              Are we fat-shaming capacitors now? They look equal proportioned to me.

              Did you use one of you multiple multi-meters to try and determine the run winding and the start winding?

              Comment


              • #8
                What was the original problem? What was he trying to fix?
                Yup. very first question to ask. And presumably you are testing the motor disconnected from the load of the compressor to know that some compressor issue is not overloading the motor?
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                Comment


                • #9
                  Original problem? I don't know. The present problem is how to reconnect those capacitors. The motor seems to run, at least for 15 to 25 seconds before the breaker trips so I am guessing that either he suspected a bad capacitor or he already has fixed the original problem.



                  Originally posted by Beazld View Post
                  What was the original problem? What was he trying to fix? Might give a hint to the current problem.
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  Make it fit.
                  You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am not color blind. It is only ONE brown unless someone (not me) has been using a black stain.

                    Fat-shaming capacitors? I simply do not know what that means. I have seen a lot of bad capacitors. I have even been up close when they decided to fail with a small explosion. These look OK to me.

                    Yesterday was a busy one for me and I looked at his compressor and took the photos between other things that were pressing. I had to hurry. Yes I have multiple meters - multiple multi-meters in the mix. I even have two or three meters that will test capacitors. I hope to use them today if other things allow. Yes, find the windings. And yes, test the capacitors. Hopefully today.

                    I was just hoping that someone had this model and could provide a photo of the wire connections.



                    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                    You could be color-blind for all I know.

                    Are we fat-shaming capacitors now? They look equal proportioned to me.

                    Did you use one of you multiple multi-meters to try and determine the run winding and the start winding?
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The motor does run for a short time. It does not sound strained. It only stops when the circuit breaker in his house pops. It turns freely when I spun the fan.

                      The actual compressor section consists of an eccentric on the motor shaft that drives a connecting link to the piston. The cylinder is mounted on a casting that is bolted to the end of the motor. It could not be any simpler. I could be wrong, but I really think that any original problem is either gone or never existed in the first place. But I will ask.

                      I also want to roll it across to my shop where I can try it on a 20 Amp circuit with no other loads connected to it. That is easy in my shop because I have four such circuits that ONLY go to my shop. None have any other outlets or lights on them.

                      Boy, this is a tough crowd.



                      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                      Yup. very first question to ask. And presumably you are testing the motor disconnected from the load of the compressor to know that some compressor issue is not overloading the motor?
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      Make it fit.
                      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        The motor does run for a short time. It does not sound strained. It only stops when the circuit breaker in his house pops. It turns freely when I spun the fan.

                        The actual compressor section consists of an eccentric on the motor shaft that drives a connecting link to the piston. The cylinder is mounted on a casting that is bolted to the end of the motor. It could not be any simpler. I could be wrong, but I really think that any original problem is either gone or never existed in the first place. But I will ask.

                        I also want to roll it across to my shop where I can try it on a 20 Amp circuit with no other loads connected to it. That is easy in my shop because I have four such circuits that ONLY go to my shop. None have any other outlets or lights on them.

                        Boy, this is a tough crowd.

                        If it needs a 20a circuit to run, it always needed a 20a circuit. It did not suddenly develop a "taste" for Amperes.
                        Waste of time.
                        Not even a logical test.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Is there a tag on the motor? Lot's of sears stuff, had the motor mfg info and model number pasted on the side of the motor.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                            Two brown wires?
                            run cap
                            Brown from motor to run cap
                            red from motor to run cap
                            black from motor to start cap
                            black from start switch to start cap
                            red from start switch to same run cap term as red wire

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post


                              If it needs a 20a circuit to run, it always needed a 20a circuit. It did not suddenly develop a "taste" for Amperes.
                              Waste of time.
                              Not even a logical test.
                              Uh, Paul isn't exactly a novice at electricity and electronics, Reggie. Teaching your grandmother to suck eggs?

                              -js
                              There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                              Location: SF Bay Area

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