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My personal findings on going to CNC from manual

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  • #16
    we have no manual mills in the shop now. It is so much easier to setup and use.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
      What software are you using to do your spindle rpm, chip load, DOC?
      Not a CNC programmer or operator (still in class at Haas U.), but does your control handle corners properly?
      Read that some control software approaches corner cuts differently, fewer stress on the cutter.
      Fusion360 when you edit each tool path, it tells you what is what. I'm finding that with 1/4" endmill, It's more about my mills rigidity than what endmill can handle. 1/8th endmills, all about the endmill itself.
      For ballpark figures, going off various guidance from others.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
        we have no manual mills in the shop now. It is so much easier to setup and use.
        I'm already getting enquiries about doing work for people. One of my co-workers needs some scale B25 wheel hubs and brakes for his R/C model.
        Plan is to get this Taig to pay for itself plus fund a larger CNC.

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        • #19
          Check out CNC Cookbook for a wealth of knowledge on feeds, speeds, machining parameters, etc.
          Kansas City area

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          • #20
            Starting with smaller cutters really will be an eye opener.. They are less forgiving and don't usually like normal 'feed per tooth' calculations.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
              Check out CNC Cookbook for a wealth of knowledge on feeds, speeds, machining parameters, etc.
              Except it's not free.
              Try FsWizard.
              https://fswizard.com/

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              • #22
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                Fusion360 when you edit each tool path, it tells you what is what. I'm finding that with 1/4" endmill, It's more about my mills rigidity than what endmill can handle. 1/8th endmills, all about the endmill itself.
                For ballpark figures, going off various guidance from others.
                What chipload are you running on the 1/8 and 1/4 endmills? Fusion tends to be very aggressive with its chiploads.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                  What software are you using to do your spindle rpm, chip load, DOC?
                  Not a CNC programmer or operator (still in class at Haas U.), but does your control handle corners properly?
                  Read that some control software approaches corner cuts differently, fewer stress on the cutter.
                  Fusion360 has a area to specify in the toolpath where and how much to slow down for corners as well as the minimum direction change in degrees before the slowdown takes place. It works extremely well. Corners are a area where tiny endmills break very easily, you are cutting along with just the edge of the cutter in contact when reaching a corner it now is contacting on half of the circumference thus taking a much bigger bite.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

                    What chipload are you running on the 1/8 and 1/4 endmills? Fusion tends to be very aggressive with its chiploads.
                    .001 and .002 respectively. .030 max step over / optimum load on the 1/4" endmill while doing adaptives with max step down of. 050

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                    • #25
                      If you only remember one thing.. make it CS X 4 divided by D...

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 754 View Post
                        If you only remember one thing.. make it CS X 4 divided by D...
                        CS?

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                          Except it's not free.
                          Try FsWizard.
                          https://fswizard.com/
                          I use FS Wizard on my phone, but I get the registered version free with my paid desktop installation of HSM Adviser. I've recommended Eldar Gerfanov's FSWizard for ages.
                          *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                            CS?
                            Looks like he means "cutting speed", i.e. SFM
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #29
                              Well that explains a lot... CS is cutting speed ... if you can't calculate it Before starting any machining op, you will loose time or tools.

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                              • #30
                                I used to break a lot of endmills. Sorry, never ran any as small as .002. I do routinely use 1/32, 0.026", and occasionally 1/64. Most of the time now when I break an end mill its because I bumped it with my hand. More often than from mistakes in machine, although if I am honest that does happen once in a while. HSM Adviser gets me in the right ballpark.
                                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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