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My personal findings on going to CNC from manual

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  • #46
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post

    I'll check the runout tomorrow. I believe the issue is more to do with slight vibration of the big spindle motor.
    I'm starting to think about selling my clapped out Bridgeport for a bigger CNC
    I seem to recall seeing a picture of that big motor hanging by a bracket not much more substantial than the original grossly inadequate bracket.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post

      I'll check the runout tomorrow. I believe the issue is more to do with slight vibration of the big spindle motor.
      I'm starting to think about selling my clapped out Bridgeport for a bigger CNC
      You missed it!
      Last week was HAAS CNC WEEK, 10 to 20% a machine you spec and an accessory package.
      You can still catch their week of demos, factory tours, etc. on Youtube

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      • #48
        I worked for a firm making aircraft parts and there is no way that all dimensions were as tight as 0.0005". Only the critical ones were, the rest were up to 0.005". And that was according to the drawings.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by old mart View Post
          I worked for a firm making aircraft parts and there is no way that all dimensions were as tight as 0.0005". Only the critical ones were, the rest were up to 0.005". And that was according to the drawings.
          The actual part doesn't need tight tolerances, but I wanted my mill to be calibrated to hit those numbers on X and Y, and it did. Would be zero point for the actual part to have those tight tolerances.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post

            I seem to recall seeing a picture of that big motor hanging by a bracket not much more substantial than the original grossly inadequate bracket.
            I need to make a beefier bracket

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            • #51
              Todays project is calibrating my new CNC probe. It is a pain in the ass.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                Todays project is calibrating my new CNC probe. It is a pain in the ass.
                Its not that kind of a probe.

                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                • #53
                  Best post of the month..Methinks..

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                  • #54
                    LOL!!! I didn't even catch my own joke!

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                    • #55
                      omg - that was awesome!

                      BTW - once you have a nice touch probe - you will wonder how you got along without one..

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                      • #56
                        So I don't have a ring gauge to calibrate the "effective tip diameter". Going to pick up an inner bearing race today for next to nothing at the auto parts store. And yes, I got it calibrated, the needle on the .0005 indicator barely moves. Only took a few hours. It's the Drewtronics TTS indicator. This is a new world for me.

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                        • #57
                          You need a ballbar probe, Renishaw makes wireless models which are less annoying (-:
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Er5aAxRZxGk

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Bented View Post
                            You need a ballbar probe, Renishaw makes wireless models which are less annoying (-:
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Er5aAxRZxGk
                            Cool! Let me sell my house first!

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                            • #59
                              Back to those 1-2-3s. Mine are 10+ years old. I have tried to keep them in good condition, but things happen: dings that you may not even see, some movement in the metal itself, and whatever.

                              One of the things that I more recently did when I got some precision ground flat stones was to use them to stone the 1-2-3s. I could see where the high spots were/still are. And there were a few places where a small polished area appeared. These were dings that I wasn't aware of. And they could have easily made a few thousandths difference when the blocks were stacked. I also was able to see areas around the holes where the metal apparently expanded. These areas were probably the ones making contact when the blocks were on my surface plate or when they were stacked.

                              Using precision ground flat stones is a very good practice. I have used them on a lot of my tools that rely on flat surfaces. They do not change the dimensions of the 1-2-3s or any other flat surface. They only remove any raised areas (dings).
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                                Back to those 1-2-3s. Mine are 10+ years old. I have tried to keep them in good condition, but things happen: dings that you may not even see, some movement in the metal itself, and whatever.

                                One of the things that I more recently did when I got some precision ground flat stones was to use them to stone the 1-2-3s. I could see where the high spots were/still are. And there were a few places where a small polished area appeared. These were dings that I wasn't aware of. And they could have easily made a few thousandths difference when the blocks were stacked. I also was able to see areas around the holes where the metal apparently expanded. These areas were probably the ones making contact when the blocks were on my surface plate or when they were stacked.

                                Using precision ground flat stones is a very good practice. I have used them on a lot of my tools that rely on flat surfaces. They do not change the dimensions of the 1-2-3s or any other flat surface. They only remove any raised areas (dings).
                                I'll have to get or make a pair

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