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Would it be sacrilage to convert my 10EE to CNC?

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  • Would it be sacrilage to convert my 10EE to CNC?

    Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.

  • #2
    Sacrilege, only if you don't fully enclose it, add flood coolant, chip conveyor and a automatic tool changer.

    Why make a silk purse into a Sow's ear?
    Used CNC lathes for sale are out there, still hooked up and running,.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post
      Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.
      Yes

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      • #4
        It is on our to-do list....

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        • #5
          Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
          It is on our to-do list....
          Why?
          How will it be better or even as good as a CNC lathe designed as so from the ground up?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post
            Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.
            Never seen a ground ballscrew with double nuts, only rolled ones. Ground ones don't need it, the backlash is already minute because of the tolerances.

            I retrofitted a taiwan 13x40 lathe to cnc with ground screws and servos several years back, vfd for the spindle. It worked extremely well. A high quality ground screw is especially needed for the X axis, any error there is doubled in the diameter measurements. Would I do it again? No... Not worth all the work when used factory built cnc's are out there with bad controls and such that make for easy retrofits at dirt cheap prices.

            First lathe I retrofitted was the famous china 7x10. Put linear rails on it, ground screws and steppers. It performed excellent BUT the work envelope was really tiny. It was basically a learning experience which purpose it served well. That lathe ended up in a small shop turning out custom parts, nearly daily, for motorcycles for several years.

            I now have a factory built cnc engine lathe, similar to the haas TL series, its a 18x40, 5hp in real nice shape. The previous owner said it just went dead one day, I bought it for $1000. Got lucky, all the problem was a bad connection on the video card, cleaned and reseated it and away she went. Beast weighs north of 4000lbs. Stock vfd and controls although 3 phase, run on single phase nicely. Still running the original Dynapath 40 control which I really like.

            I also retrofitted a American Way lathe, small cnc with a 5C spindle, servo's, vfd full enclosure etc. Same deal, dead control, retrofitted it to linuxcnc with the same servos etc. It worked fantastic, sold it when I moved south. That lathe has been making parts in a commercial shop daily ever since. Paid $500 for it.

            Even though most commercial cnc lathes are BIG, not all are.... Ones with good iron and a bad control are dirt cheap and the best way to go on a small budget for big performance. Hardinge is one example who made small cnc lathes.

            Also have a jet GHB1340 manual lathe which I really like and use a lot. For many things, manual is easier and quicker than cnc when it comes to a lathe.
            Last edited by Sparky_NY; 09-27-2020, 11:44 AM.

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            • #7
              You can never have too many? As nice as the it is - it would be much easier to run with a conversion.

              Something like these lathe macros make doing 'manual' operations really easy. (plus you get tool offsets)
              https://forum.linuxcnc.org/41-guis/2...macros?start=0

              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

              Why?
              How will it be better or even as good as a CNC lathe designed as so from the ground up?

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              • #8
                Although it would be questionable whether or not it would be very cost effective, repurposing a machine tool into something more useful to "your friend" can hardly be considered sacrilege. How many 10EE's did Monarch make really? It is not like they are particularly rare. Before I start a flame war, I am as much an old machine purist as anyone who values the craftsmanship of the old iron, but I also can see modification to things to make them more useful or just as an exercise in can it be done. If you do please post pictures of the process. Jim

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jmm03 View Post
                  Although it would be questionable whether or not it would be very cost effective, repurposing a machine tool into something more useful to "your friend" can hardly be considered sacrilege. How many 10EE's did Monarch make really? It is not like they are particularly rare. Before I start a flame war, I am as much an old machine purist as anyone who values the craftsmanship of the old iron, but I also can see modification to things to make them more useful or just as an exercise in can it be done. If you do please post pictures of the process. Jim
                  If the ways are in good shape, it has a working drive and the spindle doesn't sound like a wash machine on spin-dry, why trash it?
                  Would a Harding DSM or HLV be just as solid a candidate and lower buy in cost?

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                  • #10
                    Why would it be 'trashing it'? I mean - we are machinist after all. If we really wanted to - it could be done in a way that would allow it to be put back to manual. But honestly - most people that have worried about losing the manual control when converting something to cnc - find out that the worry was for not.

                    sam


                    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                    If the ways are in good shape, it has a working drive and the spindle doesn't sound like a wash machine on spin-dry, why trash it?
                    Would a Harding DSM or HLV be just as solid a candidate and lower buy in cost?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                      Would a Harding DSM or HLV be just as solid a candidate and lower buy in cost?
                      Yeah the DSM make a lot more sense than a 10EE to me.

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                      • #12
                        Its your machine, you are free to do with it as you like, but if you consider the time and cost of the conversion, would it be more sensible to sell the lathe and put the money towards a dedicated machine.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
                          Why would it be 'trashing it'? I mean - we are machinist after all. If we really wanted to - it could be done in a way that would allow it to be put back to manual. But honestly - most people that have worried about losing the manual control when converting something to CNC - find out that the worry was for not.

                          sam
                          But would that ever happen? You hunted and found a complete 10EE, good to great condition, within driving range, etc. Your dream machine or so you think.
                          But it's not you want, so you convert it to CNC,
                          Ten years down the road, you have a hankering for turning dials and rip all that stuff off? Not likely.

                          More sensible to sell it as old mart suggests. But yes, your machine, do what you want.


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                          • #14
                            It would be even better to keep the manual lathe and get a cnc one to sit beside it, but that requires the space and the money at the same time.

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                            • #15
                              Why not build a CNC xy slide that clamps to the ways? Convert the 10EE drive to either a VFD or AC servo motor so the software can control the spindle speed.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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