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Would it be sacrilage to convert my 10EE to CNC?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.
    Yes it would. With the price of EEs would it not be smarter to sell it and buy a real CNC?

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    • #17
      You're the only one that can make the determination if the time, money, and effort required will be worth the personal satisfaction received doing a home CNC conversion. As for the 10EE being a suitable candidate, I think I would choose a machine with a little larger swing and substantially longer bed length. Give your self some room for future expansion with things like an automatic tool changer/turret on the cross slide. Something like that could be a little cramped on a 10EE, especially if you kept the tail stock in place.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

        Yes it would. With the price of EEs would it not be smarter to sell it and buy a real CNC?
        What's the value of EE's these days,if I remembered correctly from RB earlier posts there's a complicated electrical system on them.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
          Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.
          Well, lets see. I have CNCed a Emco RF-45 so why not? Same stuff right.

          I mean its just a lathe, nuthin special bout those.

          I wont be doing it to mine I also have four brand new thyratrons for mine so I need to use those up first JR
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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          • #20
            You're probably better off converting that 10EE into cash, and buying a Hardinge chucker, or dsm to cnc IMO. The value in the monarch is the entire package as a manual toolroom lathe. A flat bed Hardinge without a leadscrew would be a better platform to build off of. Collet closer can my pneumatically controlled, and the layout is practically a clean slate for a rail (or leave flat way) and ballscrew build. The good news is they can be had for dirt cheap too, as they are not really money makers anymore for most professional shops, and have little to no value in the hobby market, whereas your 10ee does.

            I know it's tempting because you already have it, but I wouldn't do it if it were me. There's probably enough value in the 10ee, to buy a donor lathe, and a good portion of all the conversion bit needed.

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            • #21
              I see no big deal in doing it, especially if it is it’s going to give you more pleasure/use out of it. It’s not like it’s the only one out there and even if it was, so what, it’s yours and you can do what you want.

              Its like the old car game, someone always cries when a complete original car gets cut up for a hotrod or custom.

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              • #22
                I spent close to 40 years machining, about 36 years on the manuals and the last 4 or so on the Computer.
                Both take skill and attention to detail, but If I had a choice id run the CNC's
                But there are times when I needed a manual so it would be ideal to have both.
                We at work had a 10EE at work and its a lovely little machine,to me it would be a shame to covert it , I guess unless it was done properly.
                But as others have said, its your machine enjoy it either way,good luck.
                Beaver County Alberta Canada

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                • #23
                  If you can convert a very nice lathe to CNC , and be able to live without having to use a manual lathe now and then......
                  I doubt we would ever have much to talk about or share..
                  I mean really, you are willing to program thinning some nurs, or shortening a few bolts.. or whipping up a handful on bushings in various lengths...
                  that does not even sound like any fun..

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                  • #24
                    Sacrilege? Only if you don't use it.

                    If it were my only lathe, I would think twice about converting to ball screws. They will make manual work tricky.



                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                    Asking for a friend. Put ground ballscrews with double nuts on it, VFD and 3 phase motor. Maybe servos with encoder rails. Just day dreaming.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                    • #25
                      I haven't even used it yet. I got it for $1600, the two steady rests it came with apparently go for 1k by themselves.
                      The 10EE will get its turn for attention. I will certainly use it as a manual lathe first, for a while.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        Sacrilege? Only if you don't use it.

                        If it were my only lathe, I would think twice about converting to ball screws. They will make manual work tricky.




                        It's my "other" 12" lathe. I could convert the Asian lathe to CNC instead.

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                        • #27
                          Exactly, that makes more sense..

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                          • #28
                            A decent 10EE is likely worth more than a CNC version, unless the CNC version is done in an absolutely top quality best in class manner.

                            Also, consider that the 10EE has wear, and so is not going to be extra super-duper unless that is corrected first. You would be better off to convert a new machine so YOU put the wear on it.

                            Also, how is a 10EE converted to CNC any better than one that is not? You will be removing most of the "good stuff", and replacing it, so really, it is no longer anything but a somewhat small CNC lathe. It seems there is hardly any advantage to using a 10EE as the base. Most of the "10EE-ness" will be stripped off of it and not used, to be sold, or rust away in the corner.

                            It's yours, and you can break it up with a 15lb sledge hammer if you want, but it's worth a few thoughts as to what you end up with...... Is doing the large job worth "killing" a 10EE (one of the top 3 or 4 manual lathes ever made) for?
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              A decent 10EE is likely worth more than a CNC version, unless the CNC version is done in an absolutely top quality best in class manner.

                              Also, consider that the 10EE has wear, and so is not going to be extra super-duper unless that is corrected first. You would be better off to convert a new machine so YOU put the wear on it.

                              Also, how is a 10EE converted to CNC any better than one that is not? You will be removing most of the "good stuff", and replacing it, so really, it is no longer anything but a somewhat small CNC lathe. It seems there is hardly any advantage to using a 10EE as the base. Most of the "10EE-ness" will be stripped off of it and not used, to be sold, or rust away in the corner.

                              It's yours, and you can break it up with a 15lb sledge hammer if you want, but it's worth a few thoughts as to what you end up with...... Is doing the large job worth "killing" a 10EE (one of the top 3 or 4 manual lathes ever made) for?
                              Alright, If I do any conversion, it will be on my PM1236T. I'll leave the 10EE as a 10EE.

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                              • #30
                                I am not sure? I have had to use, and had an opportunity to use nice lathes.

                                The Monarch 10EE is one of those small lathes, "20"

                                Once you work the handles of the big butt lady you might find a new appreciation of a 20" lathe.

                                You turn in .037" you are more than likely to be in on the nose of the tool that much. JR
                                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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