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Still in the learning process on new to me LeBlond Lathe

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  • Still in the learning process on new to me LeBlond Lathe

    I have owned 13" lathes in the past, but nothing as heavy as this new to me LeBlond Regal 1332 lathe, from 1955. When I got it home I was thrilled to find that the three jaw Was a Set true type, don't know the brand, but big and heavy. When it comes to adjusting the set true feature it is a real chore, as I haven't been able to figure out how to free wheel the the chuck, I don't know if it is even possible. For now it is a real workout to rotate the chuck back and forth to adjust the set true three jaw chuck, as I would a four jaw. I would appreciate insight on these lathes from some one with experience on the LeBlond lathe. As I have never seen one before buying this well kept example, I have a million questions.

  • #2
    Hi Rogee, post some pictures of your lathe, if it is a non-servo shift you can shift the speed levers into neutral to enable the chuck to spin freely. Jim

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    • #3
      There should be a manual available for that lathe, hopefully somebody can help.

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      • #4
        JMM03, It is a none servo model, I will post some pictures this evening.

        old mart, I have a manual, in English. How great that is, it covers everything except what I want to know.

        As for adjusting the set true chuck, I find if I place the gear box in the highest gear I can rotate the chuck with little effort. However, it would still be nice to be able to place the gear box into neutral, if needed.

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        • #5
          Does it not have two ranges of gears, i.e. a low and hi? I have an older LeBlond Regal with such a lever, though it may be labeled A and B, or maybe 1 and 2, don't recall right now. But when I park that lever in between the marks it permits the chuck/spindle to freewheel. ...there's no mark at that freewheel position.
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #6
            It may have an electric brake that is on when the spindle is off, I have used many lathes with electric and manual brakes and most are out of the drive train when the headstock is in neutral.
            I have never used a lathe that small where the spindle could no be easily rotated by hand, there must be a lever position or a combination thereof that puts the headstock in neutral.
            This is a ROMI lathe that I use nearly everyday, neutral is found between the blue and red lever positions, it is not marked.




            This is a Trens 24" X 110" manual lathe, either of the two horizontal levers on top will put it into neutral IF you find the correct lever position, this is also not marked, neutral is located SOMEWHERE between fully right and fully left, there is no detent. (-:
            Play around with the levers and you will surely find some position that is out of gear.
            Last edited by Bented; 09-28-2020, 06:27 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rogee07 View Post
              JMM03, It is a none servo model, I will post some pictures this evening.

              old mart, I have a manual, in English. How great that is, it covers everything except what I want to know.

              As for adjusting the set true chuck, I find if I place the gear box in the highest gear I can rotate the chuck with little effort. However, it would still be nice to be able to place the gear box into neutral, if needed.
              It may not have an actual lever. What he was trying to say is a lot of lathes you can leave a gear change lever in between the 2 gear positions and it will free wheel the chuck like it is in neutral.


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              • #8
                Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                Does it not have two ranges of gears, i.e. a low and hi? I have an older LeBlond Regal with such a lever, though it may be labeled A and B, or maybe 1 and 2, don't recall right now. But when I park that lever in between the marks it permits the chuck/spindle to freewheel. ...there's no mark at that freewheel position.
                This + what bented said. It may not be marked, or have a detent, but there is always a neutral. If there isn't... well that's a sucky lathe and Leblond didn't make sucky lathes.

                As for a set-tru. Practicing on a 4 jaw may help. Dad has a Buck with 6 adjusting screws instead of 4, that one is no fun to dial in.
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • #9
                  OK, found the hidden neutral, that will come in handy in the future I'm sure. On inspection I find one of the set screws, in the set true chuck is missing so I will have to make one unless I want to buy a box. The chuck is bolted to the backing plate so I presume you have to slightly back the bolts off before adjusting the set true, then re-tighten. Right now the Three jaw chuck is showing .007" run out. I'm hoping that I will be able to get it down to .001", But I don't know. The lathe looks to be in good shape but this chuck has seen a lot of hard use.

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                  • #10
                    I believe the set screws generally push on a pin, and not directly against the backplate.

                    As a machinist, it's very worthwhile to start bulking up your set screw collection right now. You'll use them everywhere, and they will wear out over time. Most tooling you make like boring bars will need them too.
                    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                    • #11
                      With an adjustable scroll chuck you will be able to reduce the run out to nearly 0.000 at one position along the length of the part. If, and this is a big IF, the jaws are in good shape it will indicate fairly closely along the length.
                      Use a pin gauge to test it right at the jaws then move out several inches and see what happens.

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                      • #12
                        Perhaps a photo of the chuck's adjusting pins will help. I have a Burnerd "set-tru" and do have the instructions for doing the adjustment. If yours is a Buck the mechanism may be different but I could scan the pamphlet and send it to you.

                        Geoff

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                        • #13
                          Just acquired a new (to me) Buck 6 in. 3-jaw Adjustru. The set-screws push directly on the backing plate snout which protrudes into the chuck body
                          It's all mind over matter.
                          If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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                          • #14
                            I cleaned up the face of the chuck, and was able to read the name, it is a "Pratt Burnerd" Made in England. In looking at the jaws with a 1" round steel inserted and tightened. you can see daylight showing under the front three gripping pads on one of the jaws.

                            I think the first thing I need to do is disassemble the chuck completely, and give it a good cleaning, as it has tight and lose spots as you open or close the jaws. Any thing to watch out for in the disassemble process.

                            I want to thank all of you for your comments and suggestions They have been a great help, please keep them coming, I would be lost without your help.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ammcoman2 View Post
                              Perhaps a photo of the chuck's adjusting pins will help. I have a Burnerd "set-tru" and do have the instructions for doing the adjustment. If yours is a Buck the mechanism may be different but I could scan the pamphlet and send it to you.

                              Geoff
                              There is no "mechanism" per se, the set screws simply move the entire chuck on the spindle adapter in the same manner as moving the part with independent jaws..
                              Have added adjustable scroll chucks to existing lathes like so.

                              If necessary bore the back of the new chuck body.
                              Often the locating diameter on the spindle adapter is quite short and small.
                              Turn a ring that fits snugly on the original locating diameter yet is .025- .050" smaller then the chuck, the set screws will contact this rather then the adapter itself, they will bugger it up over time.
                              Assemble, adjust and turn at will.


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